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Canada Scheer warns Liberals his Tories are watching as Parliament prepares to return

23:30  04 december  2019
23:30  04 december  2019 Source:   msn.com

Scheer appoints floor-crossing Liberal as deputy leader of Conservative party

  Scheer appoints floor-crossing Liberal as deputy leader of Conservative party OTTAWA — Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer is appointing a Toronto-area MP who crossed the floor from the Liberals just over a year ago as his new deputy leader. The Canadian Press has learned that Leona Alleslev will be named this morning to replace former deputy leader Lisa Raitt, a longtime MP who lost her own Toronto-area seat in the October election. Alleslev was first elected as a Liberal in 2015, but crossed the floor to join the Conservatives in September 2018.She said at the time she disagreed with the Liberals' handling of the economy and foreign affairs.

Andrew Scheer , whose Conservatives won the popular vote but fewer seats than Trudeau’s None of the other parties have expressed any interest in working with Scheer as prime minister. His cabinet also has more members from his home of province of Quebec, where his Liberals suffered some of

The Conservatives have eked out a small lead over the Liberals as federal politicians prepare to return to the House of Commons next week, the. Scheer pushes back against 'naysayers' attacking his leadership in speech to conservative gathering.

Andrew Scheer wearing a suit and tie© Provided by The Canadian Press

OTTAWA — Opposition Conservatives are looking ahead to the return of Parliament Thursday as an opportunity to change the channel after weeks of very public party in-fighting around the future of leader Andrew Scheer.

In a public speech to Conservative MPs and senators Wednesday, Scheer covered much of the same ground he's trod on for weeks following the October election: that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is responsible for dividing the country, weakening Canada's reputation on the world stage and setting up dangerous conditions in the event of an economic downturn.

Scheer heads to Conservative heartland after a bruising week of challenges

  Scheer heads to Conservative heartland after a bruising week of challenges OTTAWA — Andrew Scheer heads into the Conservative heartland of Alberta today where he'll make a pitch to some of the party's most fervent supporters about why he ought to keep his job as federal leader, and how he intends to do it. His speech to the United Conservative Party convention will come at the end of a bruising week of challenges to his leadership from across the conservative spectrum, and what he himself described as frankHis speech to the United Conservative Party convention will come at the end of a bruising week of challenges to his leadership from across the conservative spectrum, and what he himself described as frank conversations about why he failed to win a majority last month.

Scheer does not present quite as tantalizing a target, Liberals privately admit. And Liberals believe they have plenty of ammunition against Scheer , starting with the fact that he owes his squeaker victory over Bernier largely to the support of social conservatives who want to re-open divisive debates about

Scheer ’s broadside comes as Parliament prepares to resume sitting after the Thanksgiving break Scheer argues his party would not have had to sign the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement The Tories have also pointedly reminded the Liberals that punishing U.S. steel and aluminum tariffs

But, Scheer promised, something new will come with the resumption of the House of Commons: an emboldened Opposition that won't let do him whatever he wants.

"In this minority Parliament, we are putting him on notice," Scheer said.

"We are not going to let them get away with anything."

Scheer accused Trudeau of dragging his feet on bringing back Parliament, saying he was doing it in part because he feared the force of his opponents.

While the Conservatives may be styled "Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition," Canadians should understand where their loyalty lies, Scheer said.

"Our loyalty is not to the government, our loyalty is to the Canadian people," he said.

"And when the prime minister puts his agenda ahead of the good of all Canadians he will indeed find himself opposed."

Tories, NDP won't support throne speech but Bloc will back Liberals' agenda if it comes to vote

  Tories, NDP won't support throne speech but Bloc will back Liberals' agenda if it comes to vote The Conservatives and the New Democrats are against it, but the Bloc Québécois are for it, so should the throne speech be put to a vote in the House of Commons, it has enough support to pass. The Liberal government is not obliged to put the speech from the throne to a vote in order to seek confidence from the House. That's not stopping Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer from promising to put forward an amendment to the speech Friday to cover what Scheer called "missed opportunities.

Liberal MP Adam Vaughan, in attendance Saturday at the CPC’s Toronto convention to begin the work of trying to respond to Scheer ’s victory, said the Saskatchewan MP’s win The sections of Scheer ’s campaign website that outlined his policies were removed immediately after his victory Saturday.

Scheer congratulated his team for working hard to knock the Liberals down to a minority government, praising two new Conservative MPs over their recent victories. Michael Kram defeated Liberal cabinet minister Ralph Goodale in the Saskatchewan riding of Regina-Wascana

However Scheer himself is facing questions of loyalty and opposition from within his own ranks.

The failure of the Conservatives to capture a majority during the election has frustrated many within the party, who felt forming government ought to have been within their sights given the myriad scandals plaguing the Liberals.

Organized campaigns to unseat Scheer at April's party convention, or force him to retire ahead of that, have been launched and both prominent Conservatives and grassroots members have spoken out against the need for Scheer to change or go.

In recent weeks, he's been on a "listening tour" of campaign managers, failed candidates and volunteers, where common themes have emerged: the party failed to put forward and communicate a convincing climate plan, and that Scheer's socially conservative views were a liability.

Michelle Rempel, a Calgary MP, who has been outspoken about the rights of LGBT Canadians, said the party has to stand up for those issues more forcefully.

Week in celebrity photos for Dec. 2-6, 2019

  Week in celebrity photos for Dec. 2-6, 2019 Week in celebrity photos for Dec. 2-6, 2019

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer rallied a gathering of his MPs and candidates on Sunday afternoon on Parliament Hill, where he said the party’s core message is that only a Conservative government will focus on balancing the books and making life affordable for Canadians.

While Scheer rejected Liberal accusations he was pandering to the agricultural industry, he and the The Liberals say the document has received an overwhelmingly positive response, including from Bernier says roughly 10,000 Quebecers joined the Tories during that period but didn’t renew their

"I hope to work with our leader to find ways we can advocate for the community," she said.

Scheer has made some early changes, firing two members of his inner circle. He also appointed a former Liberal as his party's deputy leader last week.

Toronto MP Leona Alleslev crossed the floor to the Tories last year, and Scheer said she serves as example — and ambassador to — the people the party needs: suburban voters around big cities like Toronto who used to support Liberals.

Still, one of the most senior members of his caucus — former Conservative cabinet minister Ed Fast — also refused a spot on the Opposition front benches, saying Scheer deserved to be surrounded by those who fully supported him. Fast was Scheer's environment critic prior to the election.

Fast stopped short of discussing his own measure of support for Scheer, a position taken by many MPs who say the decision rests in the hands of the party's membership come April.

"Mr. Scheer got a mandate from supporters, volunteers, the members of our party," said Quebec MP Gerard Deltell on Wednesday.

"It is the members of the party that will decide what will happen."

B.C. MP Mark Strahl, who is counted among those in Scheer's inner circle, told reporters Scheer can and will hang on.

"We need to get back to doing the job that we were elected to do, which is to present a viable alternative," he said.

"The more that we can focus on that, the stronger our party will be."

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 4, 2019.

Stephanie Levitz, The Canadian Press

A timeline of Andrew Scheer's political career .
OTTAWA — Andrew Scheer has announced he will resign as Conservative leader as soon as a replacement is chosen. Here's a brief timeline of his career on Parliament Hill: June 28, 2004: Scheer is elected to Parliament at the age of 25, representing the Saskatchewan riding of Regina—Qu'Apelle. He was born in Ottawa, but finished up his undergraduate degree in the Prairie province. He is re-elected in 2006, 2008, 2011 and 2015. June 2, 2011: ScheerJune 28, 2004: Scheer is elected to Parliament at the age of 25, representing the Saskatchewan riding of Regina—Qu'Apelle. He was born in Ottawa, but finished up his undergraduate degree in the Prairie province. He is re-elected in 2006, 2008, 2011 and 2015.

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