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Canada Liberal throne speech pledges to work with opposition parties, welcome their ideas

23:20  05 december  2019
23:20  05 december  2019 Source:   msn.com

The new Liberal minority government will face its first do-or-die vote by Dec. 10

  The new Liberal minority government will face its first do-or-die vote by Dec. 10 After Parliament returns next week, everyone will be watching to see whether Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's minority government survives a vote on the throne speech. But that's not the only upcoming vote that could topple the Liberal government. It's not even the first one on the agenda.Senior House of Commons officials told reporters Thursday that the first do-or-die vote after Parliament returns will be on a motion to allow the government to continue operating.In last month's general election, the Liberals landed 13 seats shy of a majority in the House of Commons.

Trudeau’s Liberals were re-elected in October but lost their parliamentary majority and need the support of at least one opposition party to stay in “What we’re looking for in this Throne Speech is some clear indication that Mr. Trudeau is interested in, or willing to, or open to working with us

Trudeau’s Liberals were re-elected in October but lost their parliamentary majority and need the support of at least one opposition party to stay in power. The speech will strike a “collaborative tone” and touch on Liberal campaign pledges , including a national prescription drug plan or

a group of people standing in front of a building© Provided by The Canadian Press

OTTAWA — Justin Trudeau ushered in a new era of minority Liberal rule Thursday with a throne speech brimming with humility, goodwill and promises of collaboration with opposition parties whose support he needs to ensure his government's survival.

The speech from the throne, penned by the Prime Minister's Office but read by Gov. Gen. Julie Payette, offered few details of Trudeau's agenda for his second mandate, beyond reiterating Liberal campaign promises: stronger action to fight climate change, lower taxes for middle-class Canadians, beefed-up gun control, steps towards national pharmacare and investments in infrastructure, public transit, affordable housing and health care.

Liberals to emphasize common ground in throne speech as Parliament resumes

  Liberals to emphasize common ground in throne speech as Parliament resumes OTTAWA — The 43rd session of Parliament — and a new era of minority government — is to open Thursday with a speech from the throne emphasizing the issues on which Justin Trudeau's Liberals believe they can find common ground with opposition parties. The throne speech is penned by the Prime Minister's Office but read by Gov. Gen. Julie Payette in the Senate chamber. Government sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the speech, say it will aim to set a collaborative tone, as befits a government that will need the support of one or more opposition parties to pass legislation and survive confidence votes.

B.C. Liberal throne speech takes from NDP, Greens--VICTORIA - British Columbia's opposition VICTORIA - British Columbia's opposition parties accused Premier Christy Clark of adopting their policies and campaign promises Thursday in a last-ditch bid to hold onto power as her minority

In an effort to appeal to both opposition parties , the Speech from the Throne – written by Ms. Wynne's It pledged to balance the books in four years and look for additional revenue in corporate tax while And it laid out a few new ideas , including provincewide infrastructure funding – for roads

But it also made pointed references to issues that are dear to the NDP and Bloc Quebecois. The Liberals will need the support of at least one of those two parties to pass legislation and survive confidence votes.

Universal dental care, one of NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh's priorities, was cited as an idea "worth exploring" and one that Parliament was encouraged to look into.

In a nod to one of the Bloc's priorities, the government promised that dairy farmers impacted by recent trade agreements will be "fully and fairly compensated" — with many receiving their first cheques this month.

Moreover, the speech emphasized that the government "is open to new ideas" from opposition parties.

The speech was more about tone than substance, attempting to demonstrate to Canadians that Trudeau's Liberals, reduced to a minority on Oct. 21, have heard the message sent by voters after a particularly nasty, hyper-partisan campaign.

Four things worth noticing in the throne speech, as the Liberals prepare for life in minority government

  Four things worth noticing in the throne speech, as the Liberals prepare for life in minority government Minority governments can be unpredictable, but the government’s throne speech delivered on Thursday provides a blueprint for how the Liberals hope to navigate their brave new world without a majority in the House of Commons. Here’s four things from the speech that give us a clue about the direction the Liberals are taking in the minority Parliament.  It would be a surprise if the government that introduced the new cabinet portfolio of “minister of middle-class prosperity” didn’t include some kind words for its favourite income bracket in the throne speech. Politics and governance often overlap, but that’s especially true in a minority situation.

Welcome speech package: a 4 step 'how to' guide: template and sample speech to prepare Everyone appreciates it and you're asked to do many more welcome speeches because you've Think about the common interest everybody shares - their reason for coming together at the event.

British Columbia's opposition parties accused Premier Christy Clark of adopting their policies and campaign promises Thursday in a last-ditch bid to The government's throne speech included about a dozen planks from the New Democrat and Green party platforms in last month's provincial election

"Canadians have sent a clear message: from young people to seniors, they want their parliamentarians to work together on the issues that matter most to them," Payette said.

"Parliamentarians: Canadians  are counting on you to fight climate change, strengthen the middle class, walk the road of reconciliation, keep Canadians safe and healthy, and position Canada for success in an uncertain world. And with goodwill, humility and a willingness to collaborate, you can do just that."

Payette exhorted MPs to "raise the bar on what politics is like in this country," adding that, "after all, the government knows it needs to work with other parliamentarians to deliver results."

The speech also recognized that the Liberals were shut out in Alberta and Saskatchewan, Canada's oil and gas heartland where anger over Liberal environmental policies has fuelled talk of western separatism.

Tories, NDP won't support throne speech but Bloc will back Liberals' agenda if it comes to vote

  Tories, NDP won't support throne speech but Bloc will back Liberals' agenda if it comes to vote The Conservatives and the New Democrats are against it, but the Bloc Québécois are for it, so should the throne speech be put to a vote in the House of Commons, it has enough support to pass. The Liberal government is not obliged to put the speech from the throne to a vote in order to seek confidence from the House. That's not stopping Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer from promising to put forward an amendment to the speech Friday to cover what Scheer called "missed opportunities.

B.C. throne speech first step in Liberal defeat. But the prospect of defeat hasn't deterred the Liberals from releasing details of the throne speech in advance, including major policy shifts on issues that weren't featured by the party in last month's election campaign, such as increasing monthly

Opposition leaders picked holes in the document. But their reactions were not as overtly negative as those that followed recent Throne Speeches delivered The government devoted an entire page of the speech to environmental issues, promising, among other things, to work with the provinces on

"The government has heard Canadians' concerns that the world is increasingly uncertain and that the economy is changing," Payette said. "And in this context, regional needs and differences really matter. Today's regional economic concerns are both justified and important."

The speech noted that "a clear majority of Canadians voted for ambitious climate action now," and reiterated the Liberals' pledge to maintain the national carbon price and achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. Net zero means greenhouse gas emissions are reduced so much that the remaining emissions can be absorbed by natural or technological means, leaving none to remain trapped in the atmosphere.

There was no direct reference to the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project, which is opposed by the Bloc, New Democrats and Greens as antithetical to the fight against climate change. The Trudeau government purchased the pipeline to ensure the project, which is to carry Alberta oil sands crude to the British Columbia coast for export overseas, goes ahead.

But, as hard as the government vowed to fight climate change, the speech promised it will "work just as hard to get Canadian resources to new markets and offer unwavering support to the hardworking women and men in Canada's natural resources sectors, many of whom have faced tough times recently."

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 5, 2019.

Joan Bryden, The Canadian Press

B.C. finds common ground in federal government's throne speech .
VICTORIA — B.C. is keeping a watchful eye for common ground in the new agenda Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government unveiled in Ottawa on Thursday. The federal Liberal government’s speech from throne promised action on housing affordability, child care, First Nations reconciliation, climate change, cellphone bills and health care — all priorities of Premier John Horgan’s B.C. NDP government. “I heard some promising common ground today,” said B.C. Finance Minister Carole James. “ Federal commitments in these areas align with the policies we are advancing and the services we are delivering for British Columbians.

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