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Canada B.C. finds common ground in federal government's throne speech

07:51  06 december  2019
07:51  06 december  2019 Source:   vancouversun.com

The new Liberal minority government will face its first do-or-die vote by Dec. 10

  The new Liberal minority government will face its first do-or-die vote by Dec. 10 After Parliament returns next week, everyone will be watching to see whether Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's minority government survives a vote on the throne speech. But that's not the only upcoming vote that could topple the Liberal government. It's not even the first one on the agenda.Senior House of Commons officials told reporters Thursday that the first do-or-die vote after Parliament returns will be on a motion to allow the government to continue operating.In last month's general election, the Liberals landed 13 seats shy of a majority in the House of Commons.

OTTAWA — Justin Trudeau ushered in a new era of minority Liberal rule Thursday with a throne speech brimming with humility, goodwill and promises of collaboration with opposition parties whose support he needs to ensure his government ’ s survival.

OTTAWA — The 43rd session of Parliament — and a new era of minority government — opens today with a speech from the throne that will emphasize the issues on which Justin Trudeau’ s Liberals believe they can find common ground with opposition parties.

Julie Payette sitting in a chair: Governor General Julie Payette delivers the speech from the throne at the Senate.© SEAN KILPATRICK Governor General Julie Payette delivers the speech from the throne at the Senate.

VICTORIA — B.C. is keeping a watchful eye for common ground in the new agenda Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government unveiled in Ottawa on Thursday.

The federal Liberal government’s speech from throne promised action on housing affordability, child care, First Nations reconciliation, climate change, cellphone bills and health care — all priorities of Premier John Horgan’s B.C. NDP government.

“I heard some promising common ground today,” said B.C. Finance Minister Carole James. “ Federal commitments in these areas align with the policies we are advancing and the services we are delivering for British Columbians.”

Liberals to emphasize common ground in throne speech as Parliament resumes

  Liberals to emphasize common ground in throne speech as Parliament resumes OTTAWA — The 43rd session of Parliament — and a new era of minority government — is to open Thursday with a speech from the throne emphasizing the issues on which Justin Trudeau's Liberals believe they can find common ground with opposition parties. The throne speech is penned by the Prime Minister's Office but read by Gov. Gen. Julie Payette in the Senate chamber. Government sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the speech, say it will aim to set a collaborative tone, as befits a government that will need the support of one or more opposition parties to pass legislation and survive confidence votes.

FREDERICTON - New Brunswick' s minority Liberal government has presented a throne speech with a bit of something for everyone, but it may not be "By embracing the minority government situation, members of the legislative assembly have an opportunity to find common ground while bringing

< New Brunswick’ s minority Liberal government has presented a throne speech with a bit of something for everyone, but it may not be enough “By embracing the minority government situation, members of the legislative assembly have an opportunity to find common ground while bringing

Trudeau will first have to get his throne speech through the house with support from other parties, due to his reduced minority government. Then will come a budget update — expected as early as next week — to put money behind the promises.

“It is my hope that we will soon see greater partnership with our government on improving affordable housing, important infrastructure that people depend on such as transit, and increased federal funding to B.C. for health care,” said James.

The throne speech seemed to place emphasis on funding for before and after school care. B.C. is instead looking for Ottawa to renew a $153-million, three-year, child care funding agreement that expires on March 31. The province needs the money to keep open 53 prototype sites for $10-a-day child care, which the NDP promised to expand in the 2017 provincial election.

Four things worth noticing in the throne speech, as the Liberals prepare for life in minority government

  Four things worth noticing in the throne speech, as the Liberals prepare for life in minority government Minority governments can be unpredictable, but the government’s throne speech delivered on Thursday provides a blueprint for how the Liberals hope to navigate their brave new world without a majority in the House of Commons. Here’s four things from the speech that give us a clue about the direction the Liberals are taking in the minority Parliament.  It would be a surprise if the government that introduced the new cabinet portfolio of “minister of middle-class prosperity” didn’t include some kind words for its favourite income bracket in the throne speech. Politics and governance often overlap, but that’s especially true in a minority situation.

National unity. Mr Trudeau vowed to find common ground amid growing concern over regional divides. Image copyright Reuters. The government also promised to make life more affordable by cutting the cost of cellphone and wireless bills by 25%, and increasing the federal minimum wage.

New Brunswick’ s minority Liberal government has presented a throne speech with a bit of something for everyone, but it may not be “By embracing the minority government situation, members of the legislative assembly have an opportunity to find common ground while bringing more perspectives

The throne speech did promise to cut cellphone bills by 25 per cent. That dovetails with B.C.’s recently announced efforts to appoint Maple Ridge MLA Bob D’Eith to lobby Ottawa to enact telecommunications reforms.

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan, who is the Vancouver South Liberal MP, said he sees similarities between B.C. and Ottawa’s agendas.

“It’s not even about just the B.C. government but it’s about what Canadians expect from us,” Sajjan said Thursday. “There’s absolutely great overlap there.

“I can assure you when it comes to a lot of things I heard in my own riding, our throne speech is tackling some of those challenges, especially when it comes to climate change, and making sure that we have a strong economy moving forward for our children, and we look after our seniors.”

Sajjan highlighted the push for a national pharmacare program, also mentioned in the throne speech.

Tories, NDP won't support throne speech but Bloc will back Liberals' agenda if it comes to vote

  Tories, NDP won't support throne speech but Bloc will back Liberals' agenda if it comes to vote The Conservatives and the New Democrats are against it, but the Bloc Québécois are for it, so should the throne speech be put to a vote in the House of Commons, it has enough support to pass. The Liberal government is not obliged to put the speech from the throne to a vote in order to seek confidence from the House. That's not stopping Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer from promising to put forward an amendment to the speech Friday to cover what Scheer called "missed opportunities.

New Brunswick' s minority Liberal government has presented a throne speech with a bit of something for everyone, but it may not be "By embracing the minority government situation, members of the legislative assembly have an opportunity to find common ground while bringing more perspectives to.

Government sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the speech , say it will aim to set a The speech is to give only a rough sketch of the priorities that will drive the government in the days to come. Some of the details will be filled in when

“Pharmacare is going to be very important especially for seniors so they don’t have to pay those high drug costs especially in their later years when they should be spending it on their retirement,” said Sajjan.

However, Horgan and B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix warned Ottawa this week they want an increase to federal health transfers before any move toward a universal coverage program for prescription drugs.

B.C. and other provinces have expressed worry they may be downloaded costs related to any national pharmacare program, which is expected to cost as much as $15 billion. The provinces also want an opt-out clause.

The same fears exist for a national dental care plan, mentioned as an idea “worth exploring” in Thursday’s speech. Horgan backed off a similar idea last year after estimates it would cost more than $1 billion.

The Trudeau government also said Thursday it would follow B.C.’s lead in putting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples into law with in its first year.

And the throne speech offered a mixed message of both “strong action” on climate change while also “unwavering support” to get natural resource products to market.

A disturbance in the Throne Speech continuum .
For comment on the Governor General's contribution to the Speech from the Throne, we turn to a professor of philosophy of physics“We know that we are inextricably bound to the same space-time continuum and on board the same planetary spaceship,” Payette said in a preamble of her own devising, before moving on to reading the Liberal government’s comparatively straightforward plans for Parliament’s new session.

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