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Canada ‘Things haven’t changed enough,’ Trudeau declares 30 years after École Polytechnique massacre

18:15  06 december  2019
18:15  06 december  2019 Source:   globalnews.ca

'We have to send a strong message': Montreal leads call for tighter gun laws before Polytechnique anniversary

  'We have to send a strong message': Montreal leads call for tighter gun laws before Polytechnique anniversary As Montreal prepares to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the École Polytechnique massacre, pressure is growing on the Trudeau government to follow through on its campaign commitment for tighter gun control — and go further in cracking down on handguns. Montreal Mayor Valérie Plante issued an impassioned plea ahead of Friday's events marking the Dec. 6, 1989, shooting, which claimed the lives of 14 women."I want us to stand strong and talk loud about Canada as a safe place, Quebec as a safe place, Montreal as a safe place," Plante told reporters Tuesday.

Julie Payette remembered the École Polytechnique massacre on the thirty - year anniversary of the deadly shooting, saying the government is committed to continuing efforts to combat gun violence. NOW PLAYING: other. Throne Speech: École Polytechnique massacre remembered. Global News.

For years after the mass shooting at École Polytechnique in Montreal, there was resistance among some in Quebec to see what happened as more than an isolated act of a troubled man. Three women hug each other after laying flowers in front of École Polytechnique in Montreal on Dec.

(Video provided by cbc.ca)

Thirty years after 14 women were killed in an anti-feminist massacre at École Polytechnique in Montreal, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau declared more work needs to be done to combat gender-based violence and win the struggle for equality.

A gunman walked into the building on the snowy evening of Dec. 6, 1989 and opened fire in the school. He murdered 14 women and injured 13 others in a rampage before killing himself.

How the way we remember the Montreal Massacre has changed 30 years later

  How the way we remember the Montreal Massacre has changed 30 years later For years after the mass shooting at École Polytechnique in Montreal, there was resistance among some in Quebec to see what happened as more than an isolated act of a troubled man. Alison Northcott explores how that's changed."One of her friends used to say it's easier to describe a whirlwind than it is to describe Anne-Marie," Edward said in a recent interview at Montreal's Place du 6-Décembre-1989, a memorial park dedicated to his younger sister and the other victims of the Montreal Massacre.

Julie Payette remembered the École Polytechnique massacre on the thirty - year anniversary of the deadly shooting, saying the government is committed When delivering the Throne Speech in Ottawa on Thursday, Gov. Gen. Julie Payette remembered the École Polytechnique massacre on the

"The day after and the years after I still felt sad and angry at what had happened," she says. "It's not so much the word has changed , but some of the things women were fighting for have become Violence against women is front-page news, and the École Polytechnique massacre continues to

"We need to do something to make sure it never happens again," Trudeau said from the House of Commons on Friday.

READ MORE: Feminism met gunfire at École Polytechnique. It’s taken 30 years to call it what it was

a vase of flowers on a table: Flowers sit next to a plaque at the École Polytechnique in Montreal. © Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press Flowers sit next to a plaque at the École Polytechnique in Montreal. The attack at Polytechnique remains the deadliest shooting in Canada's history. Thirty years later, it continues to spark questions about violence against women and gun control.

"The reality is in 30 years, things haven't changed enough," said Trudeau. "Women, girls and people of diverse gender identities still face unacceptable and preventable violence -- violence that destroys lives, families and communities."

Events planned to mark sombre 30th anniversary of Polytechnique massacre

  Events planned to mark sombre 30th anniversary of Polytechnique massacre MONTREAL — Several events are planned across the country today to mark the grim 30th anniversary of the Montreal Massacre. On the evening of Dec. 6, 1989, a gunman entered Montreal's Ecole polytechnique, killing 14 women in an anti-feminist mass slaying before taking his own life. Later this morning, students and staff at the school's campus will place a wreath of white roses at a commemorative plaque. Also today, a book about the events and the stories behind the 14 victims written by former Le Devoir journalist Josee Boileau will be released.In the evening, the public will gather on Mount Royal at 5:10 p.m.

MONTREAL — Thirty years after the worst mass shooting in Canadian history, official acknowledgment has come that what happened on Dec. 6, 1989 at Montreal’s Ecole Polytechnique was an attack on feminists. On the eve of Friday’s anniversary, Montreal changed a plaque in a

Julie Payette remembered the École Polytechnique massacre on the thirty - year anniversary of the deadly shooting, saying the government is committed to When delivering the speech from the throne in Ottawa on Thursday, Gov. Gen. Julie Payette remembered the École Polytechnique massacre on

As part of the grim anniversary, staff and students gathered at the school on Friday morning, where they placed a wreath of white roses at the commemorative plaque honouring the victims.

Geneviève BergeronHélène ColganNathalie CroteauBarbara DaigneaultAnne-Marie EdwardMaud HaviernickBarbara Klucznik-WidajewiczMaryse LaganièreMaryse LeclairAnne-Marie LemaySonia PelletierMichèle RichardAnnie St-Arneault and Annie Turcotte are the names inscribed on the charcoal-coloured plaque.

In their memory, a book penned by former Le Devoir journalist Josée Boileau was released on Friday about the events and stories of the victims.

In the evening, a ceremony will be held on Montreal's Mount Royal where 14 beams of light will shine into the dark sky to honour each woman who was killed. The ceremony is expected to bring together survivors, the victims' families, dignitaries and the public.

The 14 women were also honoured on Thursday during a ceremony at Quebec's national assembly, with leaders condemning the misogynist violence and promising to never forget what happened inside the walls of the engineering school 30 years ago.

The City of Montreal also unveiled a new sign at the Place du 6-decembre-1989 on Thursday to recognize the shooting as an anti-feminist attack.

"The sign now clearly explains why 14 women, who had their entire lives ahead of them, lost them," said Montreal Mayor Valérie Plante.

READ MORE: École Polytechnique plaque changes reference to massacre

— With files from Global News' Alessia Simona Maratta, Jane Gerster and The Canadian Press

'Things haven't changed enough.' Polytechnique anniversary prompts reflection .
MONTREAL — There were promises to end violence against women and solemn reflection Friday as ceremonies were held to honour the 14 victims of the Dec. 6, 1989, anti-feminist attack at Montreal's Ecole polytechnique. On the 30th anniversary of Canada's worst mass shooting, the House of Commons fell silent as members of Parliament remembered the victims who were targeted because they were women. Conservative MP Marilyn Gladu fought back tears as she listed the names of the 14 murdered women. Gladu said that as the first female engineer elected to the House of Commons, she feels a special bond to the victims."These women were my sisters," she said.

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