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Canada Over 32,000 potassium iodide pills ordered in 2 days following false alarm at Pickering nuclear power plant

17:50  14 january  2020
17:50  14 january  2020 Source:   cbc.ca

Alert about Pickering nuclear plant incident sent 'in error,' Ontario Power Generation says

  Alert about Pickering nuclear plant incident sent 'in error,' Ontario Power Generation says Ontario Power Generation says an alert sent early Sunday about an incident at the Pickering nuclear generating station east of Toronto was sent "in error.""There is no danger to the public or environment," OPG said in the tweet.

Some residents near the Pickering nuclear plant reminded others that in case of a real emergency those living near the power station can get pills from the government. Several years ago I received a package of potassium iodide pills from the government to administer to my family in the case of a

Last week's false alarm in Hawaii indicating a nuclear attack also fueled sales. He's working day now starts at 7 a.m. through to midnight. When North Korea launched a missile over Japan in August, Mypatriotsupply.com sold potassium iodide pills mostly to the Pacific Northwest and California

Tens of thousands of people in the Greater Toronto Area have placed orders for free potassium iodide pills in the days following a false alert from the province about an incident at a nuclear plant in Pickering, Ont.

Sunday's alert, which was sent to mobile phones across the entire province, shocked those living within a 10 kilometre radius of the Durham Region plant and those who reside further away.

About an hour after the 7:24 a.m. alert, Ontario Power Generator (OPG), the plant's operator, tweeted without explanation that the warning "was sent in error."

Although the mistake left some people fuming, others stepped up their planning for a real emergency.

False alert about Pickering nuclear plant caused widespread alarm, but some residents 'not worried'

  False alert about Pickering nuclear plant caused widespread alarm, but some residents 'not worried' People across Ontario were jolted awake Sunday morning by an alert from the province about a nuclear power-plant incident at the Pickering Nuclear Generation Station.The alert was issued provincewide at 7:24 a.m. ET. About an hour later, Ontario Power Generator, the plant's operator, tweeted without explanation that the warning "was sent in error.

“A nuclear bomb explosion or a nuclear power plant meltdown releases radioactive iodine into the air and nearby people inhale the radioactive iodine Most recently, in the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi disaster in Japan, Japanese authorities distributed 230, 000 units of potassium iodide tablets

People that live, work or study close to a nuclear power stations are often asked to take potassium iodide pills in the event that radiation is accidentally released. So how do they work?

Between Sunday morning and Monday afternoon, 32,388 orders were placed for potassium iodide tablets through Durham Region's PrepareToBeSafe website, which is jointly managed by the City of Toronto and OPG.

Typically, OPG says there are between 100 and 200 orders placed per month.

The pills can be ingested to protect the thyroid gland from radioactive iodine that could be released into the air in event of a nuclear emergency.

In small quantities, it is an "essential nutrient for your thyroid gland to function properly," and is "effective in reducing the threat of thyroid cancer to residents at risk of inhaling or ingesting radioactive iodine," according to the Government of Canada's website.

The pills are distributed automatically to homes and businesses within 10 kilometers of every nuclear power plant in Ontario.

For people within 10 to 50 kilometers of a plant, they can be ordered for free through the PrepareToBeSafe website.

Canada's nuclear watchdog eyes lessons from Boeing 737 Max air crashes .
OTTAWA — Canada's nuclear safety regulator is looking to draw valuable lessons from an unexpected source — the recent Boeing 737 Max airplane accidents. A working group set up by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission has analyzed recommendations flowing from the Boeing crashes with an eye to spotting potential improvements that could just as easily apply to the atomic energy industry, an internal briefing note says. Aviation authorities aroundA working group set up by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission has analyzed recommendations flowing from the Boeing crashes with an eye to spotting potential improvements that could just as easily apply to the atomic energy industry, an internal briefing note says.

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