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Canada Son of Iran crash victim says father 'stood strong'

09:50  16 january  2020
09:50  16 january  2020 Source:   cbc.ca

Trudeau pledges Canadian support to investigation of Iran plane crash

  Trudeau pledges Canadian support to investigation of Iran plane crash OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada will work with its international partners to thoroughly investigate the cause of the plane crash in Iran that killed 63 Canadians. Trudeau says Foreign Affairs Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne and Transport Minister Marc Garneau are reaching out to their international counterparts. Garneau said on Twitter that Canada would offer technical assistance in the crash investigation. Trudeau isTrudeau says Foreign Affairs Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne and Transport Minister Marc Garneau are reaching out to their international counterparts.

8, says his father was a strong role model who encouraged positive thinking. 3:18. "If I could describe [my father ] in one word, it would be strong . He's been through tragedy after tragedy, wall after wall, wrong turn after wrong turn — and he's stood strong ," his son said , as people in the audience

Iran says it mistakenly shot down a Ukrainian airliner on Wednesday, killing 176 people. Edmonton’s Iranian community is collecting funds to pay funeral and other expenses for the victims ’ families. Fati Mortazavi, whose best friend died in the crash , said having a community come together helped her

a woman looking at the camera: Ryan Pourjam, 13, receives a hug during a ceremony at Carleton University to mourn victims of the Ukraine International Airlines flight that crashed outside Tehran. Pourjam's father Mansour, a Carleton alumnus, died in the crash.© Matthew Kupfer/CBC Ryan Pourjam, 13, receives a hug during a ceremony at Carleton University to mourn victims of the Ukraine International Airlines flight that crashed outside Tehran. Pourjam's father Mansour, a Carleton alumnus, died in the crash. Mansour Pourjam's son Ryan says his father always strived to be positive.

"I can't remember a single moment in my life where Mansour, my dad, had any trace of negativity in his voice or actions," the 13-year-old boy told a crowd of mourners Wednesday at Carleton University.

"He'd always tell me to stay positive, through the dark times and through the good, when we'd get stuck in traffic or when I couldn't get the coffee that I wanted."

Nova Scotian among those killed in Iran plane crash

  Nova Scotian among those killed in Iran plane crash Masoumeh Ghavi, an engineering student at Dalhousie University, was travelling to back to Canada along with her sister, Mandieh Ghavi.Masoumeh Ghavi, an engineering student at Dalhousie University, was travelling to back to Canada along with her sister, Mandieh Ghavi, according to Sadra Kord-Jamshidi, president of the Dalhousie Iranian Student Society.

At Carleton University’s memorial on Wednesday for two victims who lost their lives in the Ukraine Airlines plane crash , 13-year-old Ryan gave an emotional speech about his father , Mansour Ryan also added that if his father were still alive, he would tell him “that it’s going to be okay.”

After initially insisting Iran 's military had no role in the crash , Iranian President Hassan Rouhani admitted in a tweet early Saturday that the plane He also demanded consular access for Canadian officials to work with grieving families of Canadian victims in Iran . The downing of the jetliner came

More than 200 people came out on Wednesday to a vigil at the university to remember both Pourjam, an Ottawa dental technician who graduated from the school, and PhD student Fareed Arasteh — both victims in last week's crash of Ukraine International Airlines Flight PS752 outside Tehran.

Iran's Revolutionary Guard shot down the aircraft on Jan. 8, killing all 176 passengers and crew members — including 57 Canadian citizens.

'No words' can fill void

Mansour Pourjam had been working at the Ottawa Denture and Implant Centre in Bells Corners at the time of his death.

"If I could describe [my father] in one word, it would be strong. He's been through tragedy after tragedy, wall after wall, wrong turn after wrong turn — and he's stood strong," his son said, as people in the audience wiped their eyes.

2 Windsorites confirmed killed in Iran plane crash

  2 Windsorites confirmed killed in Iran plane crash Samira Bashiri was a researcher at the university, while her husband Hamid Setarah Kokab was a PhD student in mechanical engineering. Lisa Porter, a University of Windsor cancer researcher who supervised Bashiri, described her as "incredibly talented, driven and a beautiful person.""She had a bright future ahead of her," Porter said. Porter said Bashiri was trained as a veterinarian in Iran, and had aspirations to begin graduate school in Windsor in September. "This is a tragic loss for all of us and we are so devastated for her family and friends back home," said Porter.

Iran acknowledged on Saturday that its military shot down the plane on Wednesday, killing all 176 aboard, in what the country's president called a “There is no justice in this world,” said Masoud Niknam, whose brother Farhad Niknam, a dentist and married father of two children from Toronto

12, 2020 for the Ukrainian Airlines crash victims , said he 'obviously' would have preferred to receive notice of the Trump administration’s plan to assassinate Iranian He said unspecified U.S. intelligence gathered over the previous 12 months persuaded Trump administration officials to recommend the

"He was amazing. We loved each other."

Arasteh, meanwhile, was performing PhD research at the university's biology department, where he was studying molecular genetics. He'd returned to Iran for the holidays to marry his long-time girlfriend.

His close friend and roommate Reza Sananfar told the crowd Arasteh was a "dreamer" who worked hard to achieve his goals — and would also help his friends fulfil their own dreams.

a person standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Photos of Fareed Arasteh and Mansour Pourjam are displayed on a table during a solemn ceremony at Carleton University on Jan. 15, 2020. Arasteh and Pourjam were both killed when a Ukraine International Airlines flight was shot down by an Iranian missile on Jan. 8.© Matthew Kupfer/CBC Photos of Fareed Arasteh and Mansour Pourjam are displayed on a table during a solemn ceremony at Carleton University on Jan. 15, 2020. Arasteh and Pourjam were both killed when a Ukraine International Airlines flight was shot down by an Iranian missile on Jan. 8.

"Although Fareed didn't get to spend much time here at Carleton, I can see that he touched so many lives while he was walking among us here," Sananfar said.

"I thought talking about him would help me to accept the fact that he is not coming back. But there are no words that can ease the pain, or fill the void that many of us are feeling inside us."

Carleton University president Benoit-Antoine Bacon said it was important to have this gathering to help the community grieve and begin to heal.

Universities across the country paused to honour the victims Wednesday, as many of the passengers on the flight were students, faculty members and researchers.

The University of Ottawa has said that three of the victims were students there, while Queen's University has confirmed one of its undergraduate students died in the crash.

Canada has repatriated first victim of plane downed by Iranian missiles: Champagne .
The foreign affairs minister said the repatriation was done privately in keeping with family wishes.Foreign Affairs Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne told reporters on Tuesday that the remains of one victim have been repatriated so far and that while others will follow, those will likely be kept similarly private until after the fact.

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