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Canada Who will be the next Tory leader? Ask Rona Ambrose.

01:10  18 january  2020
01:10  18 january  2020 Source:   macleans.ca

New poll suggests Tories know what they want in a new leader but not whom to pick

  New poll suggests Tories know what they want in a new leader but not whom to pick OTTAWA — A new poll finds Conservative voters are far more sure about what they want in a new leader for their party than they are about who should fill that job. A Leger Marketing survey suggests 29 per cent of decided Conservative voters either don't have an answer or don't want to give one when asked who they'd like to see at the top of the party. Leading their wish lists with 18 per cent support each were former leaders Stephen Harper and Rona Ambrose. Harper isn't running and Ambrose remains undecided.Those two also led the pack among all the Canadians Leger surveyed, of all partisan loyalties, and in third was former cabinet minister Peter MacKay.

Former interim Conservative leader Rona Ambrose is the most “appealing” choice to head the While it’s unclear who will head the party after Andrew Scheer, they will have a big task on their Next steps for Tory leadership race. While there has been speculation over whether high-profile Tories

Interim Conservative leader Rona Ambrose says she plans to stay in caucus after her party chooses a new leader next year. Ambrose spoke about the Tories '

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

Rona Ambrose et al. looking at the camera: MacKay and Ambrose take part in a news conference about the purchase of F-35 fighter jets on Parliament Hill on Dec. 12, 2012 (CP/Fred Chartrand)© Used with permission of / © St. Joseph Communications. MacKay and Ambrose take part in a news conference about the purchase of F-35 fighter jets on Parliament Hill on Dec. 12, 2012 (CP/Fred Chartrand)

If Western Canadian Conservatives don’t want Peter MacKay to lead the party that Stephen Harper built, they had better get a firmer grip on Rona Ambrose’s elbow, because otherwise MacKay is likely going to take over the party when Tories meet in Toronto in June.

As candidates roll in to succeed Andrew Scheer, the question of Rona Ambrose continues to hang in the balance

  As candidates roll in to succeed Andrew Scheer, the question of Rona Ambrose continues to hang in the balance The Conservative Party is setting a high bar for candidates to enter the race to succeed Andrew Scheer, which may leave a small pack of mostly big-name candidates vying for the job. Conservative MPs Erin O’Toole and Pierre Poilievre are expected to announce their run soon, according to Conservative organizers. Jean Charest, a former Quebec Liberal Premier and federal Progressive Conservative leader, is strongly expected to put his name forward. Former cabinet minister Peter MacKay is getting closer to deciding and there is a growing sense he’ll also get in the race.

The Conservatives have chosen Rona Ambrose as their interim leader . Ambrose says she will "hold the Liberals accountable," but is pledging to work

The Tory leader hopefuls bolted out of the starting blocks in June - and now it is just down to the final two. But how does the process actually work and While Tory MPs are instrumental in whittling the list down, it's the Conservative Party members who will have the deciding vote on who will be our next

In-house polling from several other camps shows MacKay with a double-digit lead on Pierre Poilievre and Erin O’Toole, which means he is likely to win if Ambrose stays out.

A lot can change in a six-month race, but MacKay has such a commanding lead that former Quebec premier Jean Charest is likely going to decide to stay on the sidelines.

Charest, one of the cleverest politicians of his generation, badly wants to run, and he would be a formidable opponent for Justin Trudeau. He would offer centrist voters the opportunity to get rid of the Liberals without putting social conservatives and fossil fuel lobbyists in the driver’s seat.

But the westerners who built the Conservative Party do not want to surrender it to a Montreal Liberal who supported the gun registry and is getting paid to advise Huawei.

New poll suggests Tories know what they want in a new leader but not whom to pick

  New poll suggests Tories know what they want in a new leader but not whom to pick OTTAWA — A new poll finds Conservative voters are far more sure about what they want in a new leader for their party than they are about who should fill that job. A Leger Marketing survey suggests 29 per cent of decided Conservative voters either don't have an answer or don't want to give one when asked who they'd like to see at the top of the party. Leading their wish lists with 18 per cent support each were former leaders Stephen Harper and Rona Ambrose. Harper isn't running and Ambrose remains undecided.Those two also led the pack among all the Canadians Leger surveyed, of all partisan loyalties, and in third was former cabinet minister Peter MacKay.

"Approvals for Rona Ambrose among Conservative supporters are impressive, by far the highest among all the contenders and possible contenders." But in the months since Ambrose took over the temporary job, some have suggested the best possible leader for the Tories is the one they can't have.

Conservative interim leader Rona Ambrose said the Democrats lost touch with working people — a lesson that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau should heed. And the more out of touch you are with regular working people . . . the more you will be rejected.” Ambrose made the remarks at a news

READ MORE: Stephen Harper resigns from the Conservative Fund board to block Jean Charest

Stephen Harper peremptorily moved to stop Team Charest this week when the former prime minister stepped down from the board of the Conservative Fund and sources told Paul Wells that he was doing so to free himself to oppose Charest.

Harper is wise to wash his hands of the fund, which he has controlled, along with former senator Irving Gerstein, since the party was founded. A new leader will no doubt have observed that if Andrew Scheer had put in people loyal to him in charge of the board, he might not have had to quit suddenly when it was revealed that the party had been paying school fees for his children. Whoever wins in June will want their own people on the board, so Harper might as well get out now and avoid whatever unpleasant tidying up is necessary to close the books on the Scheer interregnum.

Rona Ambrose will not run for Conservative leadership race: La Presse report

  Rona Ambrose will not run for Conservative leadership race: La Presse report Rona Ambrose will reportedly not run for the Conservative Party’s leadership race, sources have told La Presse . Conservatives and potential candidates have kept a close watch on the former interim leader of the party — dubbing it “Rona Watch” — waiting for her to decide whether to contest the party leadership before they made a decision. However, the La Presse report indicates that Ambrose has made no calls to form an organization, amid questions the past few weeks about her potential candidacy. “She will not be a candidate. She should confirm her intentions in the coming days,” a conservative source told the Quebec news outlet.

Those who made a political career out of insulting fellow Europeans are conducting the negotiations, drawn from that once-eccentric clique of Euro-lunatics John Major called “the bastards”. How did the likes of Bill Cash, John Redwood and Jacob Rees-Mogg inveigle a moderate and sensible country

The next Tory leader will inevitably be compared to her performance as the stopgap. Rona Ambrose exemplifies the risk of going with a more formidable performer. During her run as Among the many Tories who say they would have backed her had she stood for the leadership is Manitoba

The day after Harper fired a shot across Charest’s bow, MacKay announced that he was going to run. The next day, the Supreme Court of Canada rejected an appeal by Charest’s former fundraiser, which allowed legal documents to be published that cast ugly new light on an ongoing investigation that has already revealed a disturbing pattern of corrupt financing when Charest was running Quebec.

Charest has to know that if he runs for the leadership his campaign could be undermined by fresh revelations from that investigation, that he is polling well behind MacKay, that Harper is prepared to move against him and that most party members already regard him with deep suspicion.

If he runs and does badly, it could make him look foolish, which would not help him in his advisory business, so I expect he will conclude that discretion is the better part of valour. That means that the path is clear for MacKay, unless Ambrose can be persuaded to give up her directorships and pleasant life with her husband, J.P. Veitch, an investment banker and former rodeo rider, who is said to be unenthusiastic about playing the political spouse again.

Braid: Ambrose remains an ideal candidate for Conservative leadership

  Braid: Ambrose remains an ideal candidate for Conservative leadership Quebec’s La Presse has declared that Rona Ambrose won’t run for the Conservative leadership. Albertans who know her scratch their heads and say, what the . . .? “A plant from a Quebec rival, no doubt about it,” says one. Who would that be, if not Jean Charest ? Ambrose still hasn’t decided . That’s today’s understanding among Alberta friends who want her to run. The pressure on Ambrose is so intense that when she does decide, she will quickly announce, one way or the other. Wednesday brought news that Peter MacKay is in . Maclean’s reported that Stephen Harper has freed himself from the party’s fundraising arm, ostensibly to ensure Charest’s defeat. The patterns are familiar.

Don’t rule Rona Ambrose out of the Conservative leadership race just yet. The former cabinet minister is still being approached by people who want her to run which is why she has not issued an official statement on her intentions, say sources.

Theresa May’s replacement will have a job on their hands to reunite the Conservatives, says Polly Toynbee and others.

If Brad Wall and Jason Kenney and their friends succeed in twisting J.P. and Rona’s arms, Ambrose would immediately be the frontrunner, with MacKay a distant second. If she stays out, the field is clear for MacKay. Add a random social conservative to the mix, and you have a four-way race that MacKay will likely win without much trouble.

That isn’t to say he is the best candidate. That’s not immediately clear, although the worst candidate is easy.

I find Poilievre alienating. He is smart and hard-working and has quickly built a strong campaign team, and has moved decisively to respond to the questions about same-sex marriage and abortion that Scheer could never handle.

But I will be surprised if he can connect with the membership, let alone Canadians who are suspicious of his party, not because of his policy positions, whatever they are, but because he comes across as mean and smug, a robotic and nasty spouter of talking points, an effective and skin-shredding opposition critic but not someone you would want to run the country.

O’Toole, on the other hand, has a lot to recommend him. A former Sea King pilot, corporate lawyer and scandal-free minister in the Harper government, he is the kind of person we should want running the country: a hard-working family man, smart, seemingly ethical, with a nerdy interest in policy details and an open, friendly manner.

Kelly McParland: Canada could use a PM like Rona Ambrose

  Kelly McParland: Canada could use a PM like Rona Ambrose Just in case no one has made it clear to her yet, which seems unlikely, there are compelling reasons Rona Ambrose should quit stalling and seek the leadership of the Conservative party. She has been under pressure for some time, and is obviously torn, given that she hasn’t rejected the idea yet, even if it may not be exactly what she had in mind for the next decade or so of her life. There’s the obvious possibility that she could become prime minister.

Maybe Rona Ambrose isn’t out of the race for Tory leader ? Former Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall’s very curious tweet about a National Post story strongly hints that Ambrose might yet make a bid. And Calgary Herald columnist Don Braid appears to be willing her to step up.

Asked whether the next Conservative leader must be a leave supporter, Leadsom, who campaigned to leave the EU, told the Daily Telegraph: “I certainly think Crabb, who also campaigned to remain, described the referendum result as a new chance but said a “big national push” would be needed.

But he did not bring any kind of fight to Scheer in the last leadership race, so if he wants to beat MacKay he had better do something different this time, and he is never going to be as telegenic as, say, a bowl of milk.

MacKay, on the other hand, is great on TV, and his wife, Nazanin Afshin-Jam, a human rights activist and former Miss World Canada, is as comfortable in front of the cameras as he is.

True, MacKay is not a deep thinker, but neither is Trudeau. Both men are the scions of politicians, born to the business, which means they have good instincts, deep connections to the party and an equally deep sense of entitlement.

That may be why both have sometimes shown poor judgment at the intersection of their private and political lives, where politicians often get in trouble: Trudeau by staying at the private island of a billionaire, MacKay by using a military chopper to pick him up at a fishing camp.

Like Trudeau, MacKay makes gaffes from time to time, but if gaffes were fatal, Trudeau wouldn’t be prime minister.

Unlike Scheer, who was not really in the same league as the prime minister, MacKay likely has the moves necessary, the fighting spirit, to take on Trudeau. But Ambrose would be better, and the Tories all know it, and they have got to be twisting her arm awfully hard.

MORE ABOUT CONSERVATIVE LEADERSHIP:

  • 338Canada: The CPC’s social conservative risk
  • Who wants to be Conservative leader?
  • Andrew Scheer’s would-be successors

John Ivison: Where the Tory leadership race stands now that Ambrose and Charest are out .
Rona Ambrose is out and she wasn’t even in. The former Conservative minister ended weeks of speculation about whether she would run for the party’s leadership by saying that she is going to pass and “focus on making a difference through the private sector”. She said she struggled with the decision of whether or not to return to political life but her conclusion came as no surprise. Her friends were always dubious that she would commit. She married her partner, businessman JP Veitch, last summer and people who know her well said she is enjoying the pace of life in the private sector, as well as being back in Alberta.

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