•   
  •   
  •   

Canada Ted Hughes, British Columbia's first conflict watchdog, dies at 92

01:40  21 january  2020
01:40  21 january  2020 Source:   msn.com

Ted Hughes, who investigated former premier Vander Zalm, dies at age 92

  Ted Hughes, who investigated former premier Vander Zalm, dies at age 92 Ted Hughes, B.C.’s first conflict-of-interest commissioner whose report led to the resignation of Bill Vander Zalm as premier, died Friday in Victoria at the age of 92. A former Saskatchewan lawyer and judge, Hughes moved to Vancouver Island in 1980, after he was passed over for Saskatchewan’s chief justice position in a move he viewed as political.  A former Saskatchewan lawyer and judge, Hughes moved to Vancouver Island in 1980, after he was passed over for Saskatchewan’s chief justice position in a move he viewed as political.

Social Sharing. British Columbia . Ted Hughes , B . C .’ s first conflict of interest commissioner who also led more than a dozen public inquiries on issues from child protection to sexual discrimination in the Ted Hughes , shown at his family' s cottage at Shawnigan Lake on Vancouver Island, died Friday.

Ted Hughes , B . C .’ s first conflict -of-interest commissioner whose report led to the resignation of Bill Vander Zalm as premier, died Friday in Victoria at the age of 92 . A former Saskatchewan lawyer and judge, Hughes moved to Vancouver Island in 1980

Ted Hughes wearing glasses and looking at the camera© Provided by The Canadian Press

VICTORIA — Ted Hughes, whose reports led to the resignation of a premier and the overhaul of child welfare systems in British Columbia and Manitoba, has died at the age of 92.

Hughes was B.C.'s first conflict of interest commissioner and his reviews of the child welfare systems after the deaths of Sherry Charlie in B.C. and Phoenix Sinclair in Manitoba prompted change.

Conflict of interest commissioner Victoria Gray says Hughes, who died Friday in Victoria, will be remembered for his compassion, determination and clarity of thought.

She says Hughes leaves a legacy that includes stronger ethical constraints on politicians and the establishment of an independent office in B.C. representing children and youth.

Montreal police say alleged pimp may have B.C. victims

  Montreal police say alleged pimp may have B.C. victims Police say a 24-year-old man arrested in Montreal for the alleged sexual exploitation of a 20-year-old woman may have been operating in British Columbia. Sergei Klenovski appeared in a Montreal courtroom on Tuesday, one day following his arrest, where he was charged with eight offences including human trafficking, procuring, sexual assault, uttering threats and use of a weapon. Investigators with the Montreal Police have reason to believe there are additional victims in British Columbia. Anyone who may have been a victim or knows a potential victim of Sergei Klenovski we ask you to contact police authorities or call 9-1-1. https://t.

Edward N. " Ted " Hughes OC ( died 17 January 2020) was a Canadian retired judge. He was best known for overseeing prominent investigations in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and British Columbia

Ted Hughes , 68, the British poet laureate whose stormy marriage to the anguished American poet Sylvia Plath dogged his reputation after her suicide Plath had had a history of mental problems and had first attempted suicide three years before meeting Mr. Hughes . She killed herself shortly after Mr

Hughes served as conflict of interest commissioner from 1990 to 1997, but his lengthy career also included service as a lawyer, judge, senior civil servant and commissioner of inquiry into the deaths of children in public care.

His 1991 conflict investigation report into former premier Bill Vander Zalm's sale of his private Fantasy Gardens home to a billionaire Taiwanese businessman resulted in Vander Zalm's resignation.

Former B.C. children's representative Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond says she applied for the position after reading a 2006 report by Hughes calling for stability in the child welfare system.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 20, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Judge grills Meng Wanzhou's lawyers on double-criminality issues .
The judge in Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou’s extradition hearing continued to press her lawyers Tuesday on questions surrounding the issue of double criminality. In the first stage of the hearing, the lawyers for the Huawei executive and the federal Crown, acting on behalf of U.S. authorities seeking Meng’s extradition, are addressing the question of whether the crime that Meng is alleged to have committed in the U.S. is also a crime in Canada. The double-criminality test must be met before an individual in Canada can be extradited to another country.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!