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Canada Canada is ‘much better’ prepared for Wuhan coronavirus than it was for SARS: expert

19:15  26 january  2020
19:15  26 january  2020 Source:   globalnews.ca

Travellers at Pearson to be asked about coronavirus amid pneumonia outbreak in China

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He says Canada is much better prep Dr. Michael Gardam, chief of staff at Toronto's Humber River Hospital, was on the front lines of the city's SARS outbreak. He says Canada is much better prepared for the new coronavirus than it was for SARS in 2003.

What is a coronavirus and how dangerous is it ? Doctors told some patients that there was a shortage of hospital beds as well as testing kits, according to posts on Chinese social media sites. Wuhan officials also said that they would construct a new hospital specifically for coronavirus patients.

a person standing in front of a crowd: A woman wears a mask as an employee works to prevent a new coronavirus at Suseo Station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, Jan. 24, 2020. A woman wears a mask as an employee works to prevent a new coronavirus at Suseo Station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, Jan. 24, 2020.

Canada will probably see a case of the Wuhan coronavirus spreading from China over recent weeks, says one public health expert.

But the country's readiness to deal with that is significantly better than it had been when dealing with SARS in 2003.

READ MORE: What are coronavirus symptoms? In mild cases, just like the common cold

“I think it’s likely that we will have a case and I say that because we have lots of connections with China, we have major international airports, so it’s entirely possible we will get an imported case of this new coronavirus," said Dr. Peter Donnelly, president and CEO of Public Health Ontario, in an interview with The West Block's Mercedes Stephenson.

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The new virus is a close relative of SARS ( severe acute respiratory syndrome ), which emerged in China in 2002 and terrorised the world for over half a year before burning out. The two big questions are how easily the virus can be passed directly from person to person and just how dangerous it is .

Taiwan also reported an infection on Tuesday. Most were people from Wuhan or had recently The coronavirus family includes the common cold as well as viruses that cause more serious illnesses Meanwhile, a WHO panel of experts on the new coronavirus said " it is a bit too early" to consider

“The thing to remember is that we have much better preparedness this time around.”

The virus has infected nearly 900 people and killed roughly 26 since it was first identified on Dec. 31.

Originating in a market in the Chinese city of Wuhan, it has since spread to Thailand, Singapore, Taiwan, Japan and the United States.

In the U.S., the country's second case of the virus, reported last week, was confirmed as arriving from an individual travelling from the region of origin.

On Friday, France also confirmed two cases of the coronavirus.

As of Jan. 24, there are no cases confirmed in Canada.

READ MORE: France confirms 2 cases of coronavirus as U.S. announces 2nd

The coronavirus is a previously unknown strain in the same family of viruses also identified in the SARS outbreak of 2003.

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So far, experts say, concerns that the Wuhan coronavirus is the next SARS are overblown. The two virus' symptoms and origins may be comparable, but It might be more contagious, however, given that the outbreak is spreading faster than SARS did. Eric Toner, a senior scientist at John Hopkins

Dr. Denison described the new Wuhan coronavirus as “sort of a first cousin of SARS ,” more closely related to it than to MERS, based on its genetic sequence. “Now that you have a cluster of 14 health care workers infected, it suggests that the potential for spread is much greater,” said Dr. Ian W

During that outbreak, 44 Canadians died and roughly 800 were sickened in what the World Health Organization (WHO) declared to be a global health emergency. Roughly 800 people around the world died while just over 8,000 were infected.

Both cause fever and respiratory difficulties, including pneumonia.

But comparisons between the outbreak of SARS and the current Wuhan coronavirus have also stressed that while there are some similarities in the viruses themselves, the global conditions in which they are spreading are vastly different.

Donnelly noted that his own agency, as an example, did not exist during the SARS outbreak and that the state of public health organization and awareness have improved greatly since 2003.

“I think we are as well prepared as we can be for this and similar threats.”

Coronavirus symptoms: What does being infected look like? .
The coronavirus continues to spread rapidly and ferociously, and the World Health Organization is considering declaring a state of global emergency as the death toll reaches 170 in China. Several government health organizations have released guidelines on how to potentially identify coronavirus, as research paints a more detailed picture on what the virus looks like. Several government health organizations have released guidelines on how to potentially identify coronavirus, as research paints a more detailed picture on what the virus looks like.

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