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Canada Quebec suspends plan to make assisted dying open to people with mental illness

17:15  27 january  2020
17:15  27 january  2020 Source:   cbc.ca

Medical aid in dying should be extended to people with mental illness, report says

  Medical aid in dying should be extended to people with mental illness, report says Medical aid in dying should be extended to people with mental illness, report says“There is no reason to believe that suffering from mental disorders in some cases is not as intolerable and deserving of relief as suffering from physical disorders,” reads the new report from the Institute For Research on Public Policy, by a panel of eight professors of medicine, law, sociology, psychiatry and nursing from across Canada.

For some people living with mental illness , they may only experience symptoms for a short period in their life. But for people like me, I will experience mental illness This may actually prompt people to get treatment one more time or possibly delay the end of their life by giving them a moment of reflection.

Quebec plans to expand medical aid in dying to include people with severe, incurable mental illness , the province’s health minister says, with guidelines to To comply with the provincial law, prospective recipients would still have to be 18 years old or older, have the mental capacity to make their own

a close up of a person in glasses looking at the camera: Quebec's Health Minister Danielle McCann faced outcry from some after announcing last week that the provincial government would comply with a Superior Court decision that struck down the 'end-of-life' requirement in Quebec's law on medically assisted death.© Sylvain Roy Roussel/CBC Quebec's Health Minister Danielle McCann faced outcry from some after announcing last week that the provincial government would comply with a Superior Court decision that struck down the 'end-of-life' requirement in Quebec's law on medically assisted death.

The Quebec government has put on hold its plan to allow medically assisted death to people with severe mental illness as it seeks more input from experts on the issue.

Health Minister Danielle McCann announced last week that the government would comply with a Quebec Superior Court decision that struck down the "end-of-life" requirement in Quebec's law on medically assisted death.

Griffiths: Canada must not make assisted suicide any easier

  Griffiths: Canada must not make assisted suicide any easier Canada has gone further and faster than just about any other nation in legalizing and normalizing the killing of human beings through its medical system. In this trailblazing project, we are poised once again to break into new territory in 2020, and the public has but a few days to participate in the government’s i nitial consultation process . The opportunity to be heard is good in principle – but it really only extends to those who can affirm the essence of the current “medical assistance in dying” legislation and are content merely to discuss the degree of its expansion.

André Picard: The mentally ill must be part of the assisted - dying debate. The problem, essentially, was that Maier-Clayton was suffering from a mental illness , albeit one with debilitating physical symptoms. Just one mentally ill patient, a woman known only as E.F., has been granted a

Quebec faced legal obstacles to implementing its own assisted - dying law after a Superior Court justice granted an injunction to put the law on hold, but Its 21 recommendations included making assisted dying available to people with mental illnesses or psychiatric conditions, and offered a process for

The same judgment invalidated the "reasonably foreseeable natural death" requirement of the federal Criminal Code.

McCann's announcement meant that as of March 12, medically assisted death would be accessible in Quebec to people with mental illnesses, as well as others with incurable but not terminal symptoms.

That sparked concern the government was pushing ahead with a major change without thinking through the consequences.

On Monday, McCann said she has decided to take "a pause" on allowing assisted dying to people with mental health problems.

"I'm very sensitive to what has come out in the last few days," she told reporters.

"We need to have a social consensus around this question."

McCann said those with neurodegenerative problems, but without a foreseeable death, will still be eligible for assisted death starting March 12, in compliance with the court ruling.

That includes Nicole Gladu and Jean Truchon, two Montrealers who successfully challenged the province's law.

McCann said a public consultation will take place next month. The minister is holding a one-day forum today in Montreal with provincial stakeholders ahead of the consultations.

Ottawa also revising law

The federal government is also working to comply with the Quebec Superior Court ruling, even though it only applies to Quebec.

Ottawa is seeking views through an online questionnaire, closing Jan. 27, on how the law should be changed.

Federal cabinet ministers are, as well, holding in-person discussions with experts across the country.

Quebec Court of Appeal to hear Alexandre Bissonnette appeals on Monday .
MONTREAL — Quebec's high court will hear arguments Monday as to whether the length of the sentence handed down to convicted Quebec City mosque shooter Alexandre Bissonnette should be changed. Nearly three years after the massacre that claimed six lives at the Islamic Cultural Centre in the provincial capital, lawyers will argue the matter before the Quebec Court of Appeal. Bissonnette was sentenced to 40 years behind bars after pleading guilty to killing six Muslim men and wounding several others on Jan. 29, 2017 after opening fire at evening prayers.His attorneys appealed his sentence, calling the four decade prison term "unreasonable.

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