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Canada Rex Murphy: The Liberals' sliver lining: as Canada grinds to a halt, emissions decline

21:26  21 february  2020
21:26  21 february  2020 Source:   nationalpost.com

Nearly 80 per cent of Albertans think the country is in the midst of a unity crisis: poll

  Nearly 80 per cent of Albertans think the country is in the midst of a unity crisis: poll Nearly 80 per cent of residents in Alberta and Saskatchewan think the federal government has lost touch with average people in the two provinces, says a new poll commissioned by the communications firm Navigator. Nearly two-thirds of people in Alberta and Saskatchewan think the country is in the midst of a national unity crisis, along with a razor-thin majority of 51 per cent of Canadians across the country. The numbers are lowest in Manitoba, where only 41 per cent of people think the country is experiencing a national unity crisis and the Atlantic provinces, where 44 per cent agree.

a sign over a wooden fence: Protesters block a CN rail line in Edmonton in solidarity with Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs, on Feb. 19, 2020. © David Bloom/Postmedia News Protesters block a CN rail line in Edmonton in solidarity with Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs, on Feb. 19, 2020.

Has the bat-signal gone out for the Minister of Middle Class Prosperity to insert the power of her mighty mandate into the current crisis? We need the full power of this enigmatic ministry to sort us out. It’s not like there’s anything else in that portfolio keeping the minister busy.

Has the word come in from the PMO to get the gender analytics team into full feminist gear, and by studious scrutinization of gender categories and sub-categories get a definitive X-ray of what this crisis is really about? Surely sexism must be at the heart of it, it being a truism with every progressive government that sexism is at the heart of everything.

Patrick Johnston: Suddenly, the Canucks are fighting mad

  Patrick Johnston: Suddenly, the Canucks are fighting mad Patrick Johnston: Suddenly, the Canucks are fighting mad “No, no. Don’t give him that credit. Not allowed,” he said with a laugh.

Where’s the Deliverology Maestro now that the country really needs him? Has the wisdom of this sage so fully evaporated since the Liberals went into full symposium with him — children at the feet of a guru — in the early and cheerful days of their initial majority? If there was ever a time for deliverance this must surely be it.

It was at the very heart of Justin Trudeau’s triumph in his first election, that having vanquished the Mordor orcs of Harperland, that the country was going to be served by new thinking and fresh approaches, that anger and conflict would be no more. In an era marked by respectful thinking, exquisitely careful language, above all by the ability to listen, protests would be no more. Concord would reign, all would be sweetness and light.

Matt Gurney: Indigenous leaders understand the dangers of this moment. Does Trudeau?

  Matt Gurney: Indigenous leaders understand the dangers of this moment. Does Trudeau? The prime minister is fond of saying better is always possible. Unfortunately, so’s the opposite — worse is always possible, and we may well be heading in that direction. If this were just between the protesters and the federal government, they would eventually muddle their way to some kind of conclusion. But this is bigger. Huge swathes of the country may soon be feeling the impact of shortages and economic disruption. Public anger, driven by the apparent paralysis of government, could quickly become a problem neither the federal government nor indigenous leaders want.

What few and feeble disputes that might emerge would be defused with a waving of the diversity wand, and a choir drawn from the Liberal backbenches intoning solemnly “this is not who we are as Canadians” before the Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill.

As an ultimate fillip every month a kitten and a ball of wool would be sent to every Canadian household (and Lo, a zen-like tranquillity would settle over the land). To be clear, these would be very progressive kittens, and the wood fair-trade down to the last twisted fibre.

graffiti on a wire fence:  Signs posted on a fence at a railway blockade in St. Lambert, Que., on Feb. 20, 2020. © Christinne Muschi/Reuters Signs posted on a fence at a railway blockade in St. Lambert, Que., on Feb. 20, 2020.

Finally, what was the ultimate promise of the Trudeau era? Why that the “politics of fear and division” that characterized the iron-rule of Czar Harper (which to be fair, I never really noticed during the demure Mr. Harper’s tenure) would once and for all be at an end.

Ottawa formally asks Alberta to enact cap on oilsands emissions as Teck Frontier decision looms

  Ottawa formally asks Alberta to enact cap on oilsands emissions as Teck Frontier decision looms Canada's environment minister has formally asked his counterpart in Alberta to give regulatory teeth to the province's legislated but not enforceable 100-megatonne annual cap on greenhouse gas emissions from the oilsands industry. Jonathan Wilkinson's message comes in a letter sent to Jason Nixon on Wednesday, after days of public back-and-forth between the two politicians about the cap and how it might relate to the looming federal decision on the proposed Teck Frontier oilsands mine.In his own public letter sent on Feb.

Well, as the events of the past two weeks clearly demonstrate, the Canada of “peace, order and good government” has descended on us like a bomb. Some people see the frictions of these days as all negative. But aren’t there always nitpickers?

Has no one tabulated how much the shutdown of our rail services has lowered our carbon emissions, and so put a smile on the faces of those who treasure our sacred “Paris commitments?” Diesel locomotives that don’t move, that don’t haul freight or passengers, also do not consume any fuel. Our great national rail service — the very emblem of Canadian nationhood at one point — is now even more of a binding symbol: it has a zero-carbon footprint! That demands that underline.

With a little more effort, and invention on the part of the blockaders, perhaps they could get to work on the airports. Imagine the national airlines and regional carriers, all grounded and leaving not a single stream of deadly carbon-dioxide molecules befouling our Canadian atmosphere.

I hear, sadly, that some Canadian National and Via Rail workers have been laid off; some companies are dangerously close to undersupply. More jobs will be eliminated. Projects are being cancelled, plans deferred, the great industry infrastructure could grind to a halt. However, it’s not a cloud if it doesn’t have a silver lining. No jobs you see, also means people are not going to work. And what does that mean? No cars on the road. Idle machinery. Factories at a standstill. Carbon emissions flatline yet again.

Canada Post explains why letters were delivered — that said mail can't be delivered

  Canada Post explains why letters were delivered — that said mail can't be delivered Canada Post says it all comes down to road conditions when the postal carrier decides whether or not to deliver to a particular area. On Wednesday, William Pryse-Philips told CBC News he received a letter in the mail from Canada Post telling him the area around his property in St. John's was too dangerous to deliver mail. "The letter, however, was delivered by hand… I found that rather ironic," he said at the time. But Cherry Casey, superintendent of collection and delivery with Canada Post, told CBC on Thursday, that it isn't just the condition of individual driveways that has to be considered.

a train covered in snow:  Via Rail trains are seen stopped on the tracks in front of where supporters of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs are maintaining a rail blockade as part of protests against British Columbia’s Coastal GasLink Pipeline, in St. Lambert, Que., on Feb. 20, 2020. © Christinne Muschi/Reuters Via Rail trains are seen stopped on the tracks in front of where supporters of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs are maintaining a rail blockade as part of protests against British Columbia’s Coastal GasLink Pipeline, in St. Lambert, Que., on Feb. 20, 2020.

Looked at in the cool light of reason, in the fight against global warming, this has to have been Canada’s best two weeks EVER. Keep it up and Canada, the whole wide, cold country, can soon declare itself one half-a-continent carbon-emission-free zone. Apocalypse deferred.

How do you spell Hallelujah? Greta Thunberg — Canada has heard you. Find a bamboo raft and come visit us again.

To bring this lullaby to our brave green new Canada to a finish, I’m going to take the laptop off Sarcastic Mode for just one observation. It’s gotten somewhat buried in the rush of events. It concerns Mr. Trudeau’s little sermon earlier in the week about listening to all sides, and even to those who have a different perspective than ourselves. It took just an hour before he imperiously declared — on what possible authority it will be left to others to discover — that Andrew Scheer was not going to be invited to the party leaders’ summit Trudeau had convoked.

Mr. Trudeau, in his one act of “leadership” since this mess began, declared Mr. Scheer had “disqualified” himself by “his remarks” with which Mr. Trudeau plainly did not agree. Now the Bloc leader, who wants an end to Canada, was not disqualified. Elizabeth May, who dreams of a Canada without an oil industry, was not disqualified. And Jagmeet Singh, who if he were not now a parliamentarian would probably be attending the protests, was not disqualified.

But the Leader of Her Majesty’s Opposition, the voice of our standby government, was by virtue of Trudeau’s mighty edict ruled ineligible, a non-person, not worthy of sitting down with the other three.

Even in the surreal hours of this blockade threatening to bring the country to a standstill this was an egregious piece of hypocrisy. I was tempted during the moment to mutter to the TV screen “this is not who we are as Canadians.” But what would have been the use?

Wayne K. Spear: We need to know what the Wet'suwet'en actually want .
Wayne K. Spear: We need to know what the Wet'suwet'en actually wantWhen did you learn to spell “Wet’suwet’en”? If you’re like many Canadians, you hadn’t yet heard of this First Nation, in British Columbia’s central interior, when the latest cable bill arrived. Now, everyone has a view. If opinions could be shipped to market, millions of barrels of them would be headed to Kitimat, B.C., for export.

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