•   
  •   
  •   

Canada 'A crisis': Indigenous students at rural N.S. school say they're excessively punished

13:46  27 february  2020
13:46  27 february  2020 Source:   cbc.ca

B.C. school district pilots app to track students who ride the bus

  B.C. school district pilots app to track students who ride the bus School district 58, in Merritt, B.C., has signed on with mTransport, a Montreal-based company that runs an app to monitor where the bus is and where and when students get on and off it. Superintendent Steve McNiven said the main reason the district decided to test out the app as a pilot project was primarily to keep track of high school students who take a late bus, in order to participate in after school activities. Because the students taking that bus are inconsistent and voluntary, it's difficult for the schools and parents to keep track of them.

Rural students , said Adam Sapp, admissions director at Pomona College, have “a different These students face specific challenges. They attend schools so small that some teachers double as Jeanne Minton, dean of students at Union City High School in Oklahoma, said that only half of her

First grade students in Pakistan’ s Balochistan Province are learning the alphabet through child-friendly flash cards. Their learning materials help educators teach through interactive and engaging activities and are provided free of charge through a student ’ s first learning backpack.

a man in glasses looking at the camera: Xavier Sack, a 16-year-old student at Hants East Rural High in Milford Station, N.S., feels that Indigenous students are disciplined more severely than non-Indigenous students. © Craig Paisley/CBC Xavier Sack, a 16-year-old student at Hants East Rural High in Milford Station, N.S., feels that Indigenous students are disciplined more severely than non-Indigenous students.

When Xavier Sack walks through the doors of his high school in Milford Station, N.S., he often feels like he has a target on his back.

The 16-year-old boy from the Sipekneꞌkatik First Nation said he and other Indigenous students at Hants East Rural High feel they are discriminated against when it comes to how they are disciplined by staff.

Sack believes suspensions are the automatic discipline at Hants East, especially when dealing with Indigenous students.

Racist email sent to OCDSB students

  Racist email sent to OCDSB students All students between Grades 4 and 12 at the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board received an email containing racist language from a fake account on Monday.The message contained the N-word and no other text, according to emails forwarded to CBC News by students.

The student ’ s agenda: Junior High- School student ’ s desk tend to be already very full for 11yo. They say she only sleeps 4hours a day, barely eats and only studies just to be number one but she failed Chinese high- school students get a tough life and spend most of their time working very hard.

School corporal punishment refers to inflicting deliberate physical and emotional pain or discomfort in response to undesired behavior by students in schools .

"Some days you feel like you always have to be on guard," he said. "You're always protecting yourself. Some teachers don't understand what we go through, so they don't see how hard it is."

Sack was recently suspended for 40 days for his part in an altercation at the school involving several people, although he said he never physically assaulted anyone.

a house covered in snow: Hants East Rural High in Milford, N.S., had the highest per student suspension rate among 37 high schools in the province during the 2018-19 school year. © Craig Paisley/CBC Hants East Rural High in Milford, N.S., had the highest per student suspension rate among 37 high schools in the province during the 2018-19 school year.

Data obtained by CBC News through access-to-information legislation shows Hants East handed out 155 suspensions in the 2018-19 school year — the largest number for the 37 high schools in the province CBC was able to obtain data for.

5 extra days off coming for Edmonton Public School students next year

  5 extra days off coming for Edmonton Public School students next year The Edmonton Public School Board approved the division's revised calendar Tuesday afternoon, which will see five extra days off for students next year. As a way to cut costs, the EPSB approved an addition of three PD Days and two non-instructional days for the 2020-2021 school year. READ MORE: Edmonton Public plans to add 5 more days off to school calendar The approval of the new calendar comes after parent feedback showed a preference to have the days off "clustered" rather than spread out throughout the year.

It is illegal for schools to use physical punishments like hitting a student . Here are some of the ways that UK school children can be punished . Freya’ s family say that she was given detention many times for trivial things such as drinking fizzy drinks in class and coming into school through a fire door.

Students who experienced fraud should not be required to pay back federal loans that should never have been made by the Department in the first place. He says communication with professors was sparse and his time with the school ' s tutors was strictly limited.

Among those 37 schools, which included the province's 10 largest high schools, Hants East — with 743 students and the 23rd-largest student body — also had the highest per student suspension rate.

The community has a history of racism. Shubenacadie — a village roughly six kilometres from the school — was once home to the Shubenacadie Residential School, where some Mi'kmaw children suffered physical, emotional and sexual abuse between 1923 and 1967.

The children were not allowed to speak their own language or practise their cultural traditions.

Figures provided by the Chignecto Central Regional Centre for Education show 20 per cent of all Indigenous students and 15 per cent of African Nova Scotian students within the regional centre were suspended in the 2018-19 school year.

Self-identified students of Indigenous and African ancestry make up only 10 per cent of the student population within the regional centre, but represented about 17 per cent of suspensions overall, the August 2019 improvement plan said.

McGill law students slam justice minister over Wet'suwet'en raids

  McGill law students slam justice minister over Wet'suwet'en raids McGill law students slam justice minister over Wet'suwet'en raids Lametti, a professor on leave from McGill’s faculty of law, finds himself at the forefront of a legal battle to end the Wet’suwet’en resistance against a natural gas pipeline in British Columbia. The RCMP raided a camp on unceded Wet’suwet’en territory in early February, sparking a movement that has seen railroad blockades and protests in cities across Canada.

First-grade students attend a basement school in besieged East Ghouta, Rural Damascus in the Syrian Arab Republic. In total, 75 million children have had their education disrupted disrupted by conflict or crisis , including natural disasters that destroy schools and the environment around them .

- Students often have only a superficial understanding of the information they download, - Computer-based learning has negative physical side-effects such as vision problems of teachers which are said to be at an alarming stage, especially in rural areas schools of some developing countries.

a woman in a blue shirt: Cheryl Maloney, a member of the Sipekneꞌkatik First Nation, believes suspensions for Indigenous students have reached crisis levels. © Craig Paisley/CBC Cheryl Maloney, a member of the Sipekneꞌkatik First Nation, believes suspensions for Indigenous students have reached crisis levels.

The regional centre declined to provide suspension data for the Indigenous student population at Hants East, citing privacy concerns.

Sack recognizes he did something wrong. He said he offered to take part in a restorative justice process and anger management program to stay in the classroom, but he was nevertheless suspended for 40 days.

"I'm going to need school, and the only way I can get back in school is if I learn how to manage my anger," said the aspiring chiropractor who will be going to Shubenacadie District Elementary School twice a week to do homework during his suspension.

Why suspensions can be counterproductive

Dr. Cornelia Schneider, an associate professor in the education department at Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax, said suspensions should be a last resort for staff because they are often counterproductive.

"Often students who have behavioural issues also have trouble dealing with the content that is offered in the class," she said.

10 Hockey Slang Words Every Canadian Should Know

  10 Hockey Slang Words Every Canadian Should Know Grinder. Cherry picker. Five hole. You might have heard the brosephs using those words around the Soda Stream. But don't worry, they weren't being inappropriate. They were just talking about hockey. Canada's national obsession has a lingo all of its own and for newbies, it can be intimidating. But fear not. With this handy guide you'll be talking puck in no time.

"If you kick them out of the classroom, they might already be significantly behind … so basically with a suspension, you're just making it worse."

Cheryl Maloney, a member of the Sipekneꞌkatik First Nation and a Mi'kmaw advocate, said the province should form a task force to examine why suspension rates for Indigenous students have reached "a crisis."

a man wearing a suit and tie in front of a book shelf: Gary Adams, regional executive director for Chignecto Central Regional Centre for Education, acknowledges that suspensions are not always an effective form of discipline. © Craig Paisley/CBC Gary Adams, regional executive director for Chignecto Central Regional Centre for Education, acknowledges that suspensions are not always an effective form of discipline.

Maloney pointed to the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in federal prisons, which have reached historic highs.

Indigenous people account for roughly five per cent of the population in Canada, but account for more than 30 per cent of the federal inmate population, up from 25 per cent four years ago, according to the Office of the Correctional Investigator.

"You can save somebody's life by doing something immediate. You can save the future of these children," said Maloney. "We know that they're getting suspended... at higher levels. Then stop doing it."

'Journey of reconciliation'

Gary Adams, regional executive director for Chignecto Central, acknowledges Indigenous students and African Nova Scotian students are being suspended at disproportionate rates.

Police say Winnipeg teacher charged with sexual assault gave students alcohol

  Police say Winnipeg teacher charged with sexual assault gave students alcohol WINNIPEG — A 27-year-old teacher at a Winnipeg high school has been charged with sexual exploitation and sexual assault of a student. Police say the offences involving the 16-year-old student at Grant Park High School happened between Dec. 1 and Feb. 8. The Winnipeg School Division is co-operating with police but a spokesperson would not say whether the woman is still employed as a teacher. Const. Rob Carver says in at least one alleged incident the teacher gave alcohol to a group of students. She is also charged with supplying alcohol to a minor. Carver says it's a possibility the teacher may face more charges.

He said suspensions "are not always effective," adding that staff "are looking to explore their own bias, explore their own strategies and improve upon that data."

"It's part of our journey of reconciliation, if you will, in making sure that together we have deeper understandings, deeper relationships, and an ability to look to other solutions so that the punitive ways of the past are not necessarily the default," said Adams.

a man wearing a hat: Student Miguel Greer says Indigenous students are reluctant to talk about how they feel about unfair suspensions because they fear they will not be supported. © Craig Paisley/CBC Student Miguel Greer says Indigenous students are reluctant to talk about how they feel about unfair suspensions because they fear they will not be supported.

He said the school has been working with the community to build stronger relationships. He noted a healing circle was recently held with staff and Sipekneꞌkatik community members.

"Restorative ways of coming together and speaking to lived experience and how that influences actions and decisions is part of the relationship building and the repairing of harm," said Adams.

"Through those raised awareness, teachers are able to call on more appropriate strategies that do reflect a greater understanding, appreciation and respect for the lived experience of their learners."

Suspension rules

Under the Education Act, suspensions longer than 10 days must be approved by the regional centre following a recommendation by the principal.

Although Chignecto Central would not provide details about the length of suspensions at its schools, student Miguel Greer said he feels Indigenous students are handed heavier suspensions than non-Indigenous students.

He said he was suspended on Dec. 4 for the rest of the school year for his involvement in a fight at the school, but a non-Indigenous student involved in a separate fight received a suspension of five days, plus a two-day in-school suspension.

'Sometimes you don't feel safe'

Greer said the discrepancy speaks to the systemic racism that exists at Hants East.

"They're saying that they're improving the school. We don't see any improvement at all," said Greer, who recently posted a video to social media expressing his concerns.

"Not a lot of Native students like to talk about it because it's so hard to get a word out there and to actually have people stand behind you."

Greer also said he feels like Indigenous students are not always taken seriously when they express their concerns to staff at the school.

Both students said the historical wounds in the community have not healed, and although they don't always experience racism in an overt way, they feel systemic racism has led to ongoing tensions within the school.

"It sucks, because sometimes you don't feel safe at school," said Sack.

MORE TOP STORIES

TCDSB cancels all school trips to Europe in spring due to COVID-19 fears .
The Toronto Catholic District School Board has cancelled all March Break and Easter school trips to Europe for high school students due to concerns about the novel coronavirus. Shazia Vlahos, director of communication for the TCDSB, said in an interview with CBC Toronto on Tuesday that the decision to cancel the trips affects 12 schools. The majority of the trips involved travel either to or through Italy, she added."It's been on the minds of officials for quite some time," Vlahos said.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!