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Canada Alberta's chief medical health officer in self-isolation, gets coronavirus test

00:17  17 march  2020
00:17  17 march  2020 Source:   msn.com

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EDMONTON — A doctor who has become the face of Alberta's medical response to the novel coronavirus outbreak is in self-isolation.

Government sources say Dr. Deena Hinshaw, the province's chief medical health officer, is experiencing symptoms of a cold and is waiting for results of her test for the virus.

Hinshaw has been delivering daily updates on COVID-19 cases and precautionary measures since the first case was reported in Alberta on March 5.

She has been praised for her straightforward demeanour and for relaying as much information as possible, while urging Albertans to remain calm and practise basic hygiene such as hand-washing.

Top Ontario health official recommends events with over 250 people be cancelled

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The number of coronavirus cases in Alberta has grown by six to 29, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney announced Friday.All cases are travel-related, he All cases are travel-related, he said. Kenney was attending the daily news conference usually hosted by Alberta ' s chief medical officer of health Dr

Sources say the government is looking at alternative ways, such as by video-link or teleconference, for Hinshaw to deliver her updates.

Alberta currently has 56 cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by  the virus, and is undertaking broad isolation measures to halt the spread.

There are to be no large gatherings of 250 or more. Classes in schools and post-secondary institutions have been suspended and daycares have been closed.

Albertans are asked not to travel outside Canada and to self-isolate for 14 days if returning from out-of-country travel.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 16, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Ontarians with COVID-19 no longer require tests to be considered virus-free .
Previously, in order for a case to be considered "resolved" and listed as such in public health numbers, the individual had to receive two negative tests over 24 hours. It is likely that this policy change could dramatically increase the number of "resolved" cases in Ontario, which, as of Wednesday evening, stood at eight. Meanwhile, the province is dealing with a limited supply of tests due to a global demand for them, with tests currently being rationed to those who need them most.

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