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Canada Canadian couple stranded in Peru as international borders close

16:30  17 march  2020
16:30  17 march  2020 Source:   ottawacitizen.com

Canadians scrambling to leave Europe as borders close and flights are suspended

  Canadians scrambling to leave Europe as borders close and flights are suspended POZNAN, Poland — Canadians in Europe are scrambling to make their way back home as several European countries are restricting traffic, closing borders and suspending international flights in an effort to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus. All 27 members of the European Union have reported cases of COVID-19, which has sickened more than 22,000 people in the continent, killing over 1,300 so far. Poland is suspending all international flights and trains on Sunday, leaving many foreigners, including Canadians, struggling to find a way out of the country.

Canadians working or travelling in Europe are rushing to book flights back home as more countries announce plans to close their borders and suspend international air travel in an effort to stop the spread of COVID-19.

Art Eggleton, Canada 's former minister of National Defence and Minister for International Trade, (right) with his wife, Camille Bacchus, who are stranded with 146 other Canadians on board the MS Marina in the Pacific Ocean after ports in South America refuse to let it dock.Handout.

a woman wearing sunglasses and smiling at the camera: Luke Carroll and Nicole Bayes-Fleming, pictured here at the Bolivia Salt Flats on Feb. 17, 2020, are Ottawans stranded in Peru. Luke Carroll and Nicole Bayes-Fleming, pictured here at the Bolivia Salt Flats on Feb. 17, 2020, are Ottawans stranded in Peru.

The plan was to backpack from Argentina to Colombia for four months — a once-in-a-lifetime trip that Luke Carroll and girlfriend Nicole Bayes-Fleming researched in detail with plane trips bookending their travel.

They didn’t plan, though, on a global pandemic or closed international borders. Now, three months into their travels, they are among the stranded Canadians abroad, trying to heed the federal government’s calls to come home, but unable to do so.

a sunset over a body of water:  Luke Carroll and Nicole Bayes-Fleming, pictured here at the Bolivia Salt Flats on Feb. 17, 2020, are Ottawans stranded in Peru. Luke Carroll and Nicole Bayes-Fleming, pictured here at the Bolivia Salt Flats on Feb. 17, 2020, are Ottawans stranded in Peru.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Monday that this country will close its borders to those who are not Canadian citizens or permanent residents, with the exception of U.S. citizens. Anyone who has symptoms of COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus that is sweeping across the globe, will not be able to come to Canada.

Canadian travellers trying to return trapped by border closures for COVID-19

  Canadian travellers trying to return trapped by border closures for COVID-19 CUSCO, Peru — As the federal government urges Canadians overseas to return, some travellers in countries where borders are closing don't know how they're going to get home. Nikita Singh and Marco Tenaglia are calling every government office and embassy they can to try and find out how — or if — they will be able to leave Peru and get back to Toronto. The couple had just finished a trek to the ancient Incan ruins of Machu Picchu on Sunday when they learned the government of Peru had declared a state of emergency due to COVID-19, shutting down its borders for at least 15 days. "We were like, 'Oh my gosh.

Canadians working or travelling in Europe are rushing to book flights back home as more countries announce plans to close their borders and suspend international air travel The government did not say whether it would consider offering repatriation flights to its citizens stranded in European countries.

This is a list of border crossings along the International Boundary between Canada and the United States. They are ordered from west to east (crossings with Alaska from north to south).

Canadian travellers, he said, will be able to get financial assistance to help them return home. But, beginning Wednesday, only four airports in the country will be accepting international flights; Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary and Montreal.

The extensive travel restrictions come as Canada passed 320 confirmed cases of the disease over the weekend and B.C. announced an additional three deaths, bringing the national death toll to four.

Carroll, who previously reported for the Citizen, and Bayes-Fleming started out on their trip with return flights to Ottawa booked for the end of April, but following the directives from the Canadian government they started looking into immediate flights home days ago.

Over the weekend, the government announced any Canadians abroad should try and come home by commercial means as soon as possible. Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne said the government would no longer be able to do mass repatriation flights.

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The Canada –United States border (French: frontière Canada –États-Unis), officially known as the International Boundary (French: Frontière Internationale )

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Within hours of that announcement, Peruvian officials announced the closure of their borders.

The couple boarded a midnight bus from a small town about four hours from Lima to the airport. They arrived in the middle of the night, and waited at the airport for nine hours looking for flights to anywhere with an open border that could somehow help them get back to Canada.

“There was nothing. By the time we finally got to the front (of the line) after nine hours, there were no flights available,” Carroll said.

Using spotty Wi-Fi, they found a few flights to the United States but they came with about a $5000 price tag.

“It’s just too much,” Carroll said. “We just can’t afford it.”

Efforts to reach consular officials have also been unsuccessful.

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  Canadians trapped in Morocco by COVID-19 restrictions to be evacuated this weekend: Trudeau Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said today that a flight has been arranged to bring home Canadians stranded in Morocco, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to wreak havoc on the transport sector. "We're in discussion with Canadian airlines to help Canadians stranded abroad come home," Trudeau said this morning from outside Rideau Cottage in Ottawa, where he remains in self-isolation. "We're in discussion with Canadian airlines to help Canadians stranded abroad come home," Trudeau said this morning from outside Rideau Cottage in Ottawa, where he remains in self-isolation.

Cities grew in Canada for a couple of reasons, the same ones that prevailed in the U.S.: They had good harbours to support ocean access for people and goods to enter and leave the country in the early days of mostly total dependency on foreign trade for survival, and immigration.

Pervasive international border control is a relatively recent phenomenon in world history. A closed border is a border that prevents movement of people between different jurisdictions with limited or no exceptions associated with this movement.

“Basically we really haven’t heard anything from the (Canadian) embassy,” Carroll said. The only communication he’s received is an email announcing Peru had closed its borders, sent after the measure was already in effect. Carroll has sent email after email and has only received automated responses.

“We’re kind of torn about whether we should go to the embassy.”

Officials in Peru have ordered a strict isolation policy, with soldiers and police out on the streets monitoring the activity of residents. People are only allowed to leave their homes for groceries or medicine.

Late Monday night, the Canadian embassy in Lima tweeted that because of the state of emergency in Peru the embassy was closed to the public until further notice.

The pair will book a flight for the day the travel ban is supposed to end — in two weeks — but the concern is that it could extend longer than anticipated. Several South American countries have issued travel bans to try to curb the spread of the virus.

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Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean

International reseller. Legal. Terms of use.

“Throughout most of this trip, we were following the news and the situation but it was never that big here compared to what I saw online in Canada or other places.”

That changed in the last week for countries all over the world as the virus continued to spread through travel-related contact with infected persons.

“It didn’t seem so big until just now. At the airport, everybody had masks on … The streets are basically empty,” Carroll said.

After being kicked out of a private room in a hostel that was forced to shut down due to quarantine, the couple has bunkered down with a supply of groceries at a rented apartment. They will continue to try and be in touch with Global Affairs and are awaiting details of how much money is available from the Canadian government, and when, to get them home. Barring a solution, they’ll stay right where they are.

“We’ve got enough food to hopefully last us for awhile.”

With files from Blair Crawford and the National Post.

                                      

Stranded in South America as COVID-19 spreads, Canadian travellers anxiously await rescue .
Peru has closed its borders, forcing residents into quarantine to limit the spread of COVID-19 — and some Canadians have been caught in the middle.On Monday, Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne tweeted that the Canadian government had "secured authorizations for @AirCanada to operate 3 flights this week" from Peru.

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