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Canada How do Vancouver's 'social distancing' fines work?

18:30  25 march  2020
18:30  25 march  2020 Source:   cbc.ca

Not practicing social distancing? You could be fined up to $1K and businesses up to $500K

  Not practicing social distancing? You could be fined up to $1K and businesses up to $500K People and businesses found breaking the new social distancing rules will be fined, Ontario Provincial Police said Friday. Individuals could be fined up to $1,000 while corporations could face fines of up to $500,000, OPP said in a news release. City, provincial and federal governments have been implementing measures such as travel restrictions, social distancing protocols and business closures to deal with the COVID-19 crisis. But while theIndividuals could be fined up to $1,000 while corporations could face fines of up to $500,000, OPP said in a news release.

Vancouver City Councillor Pete Fry on the financial penalties being put in place to enforce compliance with social distancing . City of Vancouver approves social distancing violation fines .

VANCOUVER -- Vancouver officers can now fine individuals and businesses that aren't following the city' s guidelines surrounding physical distancing . Physical distancing , previously referred to as social distancing , refers to a guideline from health officials that people should be at least a metre

a man standing in front of a mountain: People look at the view from Queen Elizabeth Park in Vancouver on March 18. As of Wednesday, people cannot be fined in the city for going outside. © Maggie MacPherson/CBC People look at the view from Queen Elizabeth Park in Vancouver on March 18. As of Wednesday, people cannot be fined in the city for going outside.

The City of Vancouver now has the power to issue fines to businesses and people who break rules meant to ensure social distancing and slow the spread of COVID-19. City councillors unanimously approved the move this week.

Social, or physical, distancing is a provincial public health order — not a suggestion — telling British Columbians to stay at least two metres away from others and avoid crowds of 50 people or more to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

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  Fine Canadians for ignoring COVID-19 orders or face consequences: doctor VANCOUVER — Measures limiting personal contact to reduce the spread of COVID-19 have seemed like suggestions to beachgoers in the Vancouver area, where basketball games and picnics in the midst of a pandemic prompted the mayor to announce fines on Monday. Vancouver has closed parking lots at popular sites like Kitsilano Beach, where basketball hoops have also been removed. Citizens concerned about the flouting of public health orders prohibiting group gatherings have taken to posting photos and videos of such scenes, with pleas for municipalities to enforce compliance.

Meanwhile, the Vancouver Park Board has closed all public outdoor recreation facilities within its parks and beaches as well as parking lots because of a lack of public compliance with social distancing rules. The city is also not yet ordering non-essential workers to stay put, Kennedy said.

Not following emergency orders in Vancouver during the COVID-19 outbreak can now come with a fine . At a virtual council meeting Monday morning, council How to enforce? The city had around six bylaw officers dedicated to going to businesses over the weekend to ensure the new rules fwere being

The approved fines for businesses in Vancouver can be as high as $50,000, while penalties for individuals can be up to $1,000.

So, how are those fines handed out?

Who gets fined?

There is no city order solely about social distancing; instead, the city is aiming to encourage social distancing by taking away places and environments where group gatherings occur.

The fines are only applicable to people or businesses ignoring orders issued by the city under its local state of emergency, which was declared under the Vancouver Charter on March 19.

So far, there is just one such order: the ban on restaurants and bars offering dine-in service. That order said the businesses must move to a take-out model only, to avoid crowds of customers sitting down in the same enclosed space for a meal or a drink.

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VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – Despite the grim scenes playing out in areas of the world hardest-hit Those measures could include fines of up to ,000 for businesses that remain open amid orders to shut Council is set to meet virtually – not in-person – in an effort to abide by social distancing rules.

Vancouver ' s mayor says he's disappointed that city residents are holding house parties, playing beer pong City Council will meet Monday to vote on new bylaws that will allow the city to fine businesses who How do you work out when the gyms are closed? Vancouver ’ s fitness industry moves online.

Businesses, like the restaurant or bar, can be hit with the $50,000 fine for breaking that order. People ignoring the order, like two friends sitting down for dinner, could each be handed the $1,000 fine.

a person sitting on a bench in front of a building: Bauhaus Restaurant in Vancouver on Tuesday. All restaurants in the city have been banned under the Emergency Program Act from offering dine-in service to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Businesses that break the rule could be fined up to $50,000. © Maggie MacPherson/CBC Bauhaus Restaurant in Vancouver on Tuesday. All restaurants in the city have been banned under the Emergency Program Act from offering dine-in service to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Businesses that break the rule could be fined up to $50,000.

What about parks? Aren't they closed?

The city has taken two other steps to encourage social distancing.

The first was a directive for all businesses to close down if they are unable to keep customers far enough apart.

The city has also closed outdoor recreation areas, including playgrounds and sports fields, to deter groups and teams from getting together.

a black and yellow swing: Swings are taped off and closed at a park in Vancouver on Tuesday. The city has shut down its parks and other outdoor recreation areas to slow the spread of the coronavirus, but people cannot currently be fined for breaking that rule because the closure is not an emergency order. © Ben Nelms/CBC Swings are taped off and closed at a park in Vancouver on Tuesday. The city has shut down its parks and other outdoor recreation areas to slow the spread of the coronavirus, but people cannot currently be fined for breaking that rule because the closure is not an emergency order.

The fines are not applicable to people or businesses ignoring either of those shutdowns because the closures were not declared under the state of emergency.

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“My work has definitely decreased.” Vancouver has been lucky to experience sunny skies and relatively warm temperatures since residents were first asked to stay home and maintain physical distance from others. The week of good weather has allowed residents to head outside to exercise.

How should you social distance at work , school and on public transport?Credit: EPA. Anyone who is able to work from home has now been advised to do , to lower the risk of passing on the virus. This does not include key workers , such as doctors and nurses who are unable to work from home, as

The directives could be re-declared, so to speak, if people do not comply.

"We don't at this point, intend to be going to groups of people in parks and ordering tickets," said Sadhu Johnston, city manager. "Obviously, if the situation continues, that will be something we revisit."

The fines will also apply to any further emergency orders issued by the city, but officials hope more orders won't be necessary.

The city has said any social distancing order, should one ever exist, would not apply to people walking on the street. Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry has said the public is allowed to go outside for fresh air or essential trips with members of their household, always staying at least two metres away from others.

How are the tickets handed out?

The fines for individuals would most commonly come in the form of a bylaw ticket, issued on the spot if an authorized enforcement officer has reasonable grounds to believe someone is breaching one of the city's emergency orders.

The larger fine for businesses is a more complicated process. The city is still working out details of who would be able to enforce the orders, but bylaw officers, police officers and firefighters are all possible options.

Around six property inspectors with the city visited about 1,500 businesses over the weekend to ensure the new take-out-only order was being followed. Sadhu Johnston, city manager, said only around 15 were breaking the rules.

Anyone fighting a fine would take the dispute to B.C. Provincial Court. Regular court operations are currently suspended across the province due to the outbreak.

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Almost half of Canada's COVID-19 cases are caused by spread in the community from an unknown source, and experts say that signals there could be a silent epidemic happening across the country. Of the 1,044 cases that the Public Health Agency of Canada has provided epidemiological data on as of Monday, 48 per cent are a result of infection from community transmission, while 42 per cent are tied to travel and seven per cent are linked to closeOf the 1,044 cases that the Public Health Agency of Canada has provided epidemiological data on as of Monday, 48 per cent are a result of infection from community transmission, while 42 per cent are tied to travel and seven per cent are linked to close contact with a traveller who tested posit

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