•   
  •   
  •   

Canada He didn't know mother was in isolation at seniors home until someone in full protective gear wandered in

19:36  26 march  2020
19:36  26 march  2020 Source:   cbc.ca

Walking dogs, riding bikes not allowed during COVID-19 self-isolation

  Walking dogs, riding bikes not allowed during COVID-19 self-isolation On Friday, Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe said a 14-day period of self-isolation was mandatory for any travellers, including people returning from the United States, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread. Anyone caught breaking the rules could be fined $2,000. However, there seems to be some confusion about what self-isolation means and what people are allowed to do. Here are a few quick answers to those questions: What is self-isolation? According to the provincial Ministry of Health, self-isolation means staying at home and avoiding any situation that could spread COVID-19.

a house that has a sign on the side of a road: McKenzie Towne Continuing Care Centre in southeast Calgary has already had one resident die of COVID-19 and four other residents and one staff member had tested positive as of Wednesday evening. According to Revera, the company that runs the facility, 19 of the 144 residents are currently in isolation for respiratory illness symptoms in two separate areas. © Google Maps McKenzie Towne Continuing Care Centre in southeast Calgary has already had one resident die of COVID-19 and four other residents and one staff member had tested positive as of Wednesday evening. According to Revera, the company that runs the facility, 19 of the 144 residents are currently in isolation for respiratory illness symptoms in two separate areas.

The relatives of a woman in a Calgary nursing home hard hit by the COVID-19 outbreak says they didn't even know their mother was in isolation until they were chatting in FaceTime and saw a worker come into the room in full protective gear.

Fredericton police prepared to arrest those violating emergency declaration order

  Fredericton police prepared to arrest those violating emergency declaration order Fredericton police officers have the authority to arrest people who violate the province's emergency declaration order, said police chief Roger Brown. "If someone is clearly going against what the chief medical officer has asked, we do have provisions in the criminal code," said Brown. "We have done our research with respect to our authorities. We do have the authority to arrest people if need be, and we are in a position to do that and we will do that if we think the situation warrants it." But Brown said officers will take a "measured approach" when dealing with people breaking their self-isolation and those refusing to practice social distancing.

They're saying not enough is being done to protect the most vulnerable.

"We're trying not to panic," said her son, whom CBC News agreed not to identify as he fears repercussions for speaking to media.

His mother — who is in her late 70s and has underlying health problems — lives at the McKenzie Towne Continuing Care Centre in southeast Calgary. Another resident of the seniors home, a woman in her 80s, died two days earlier after contracting COVID-19 and four other residents and one staff member had tested positive as of Wednesday evening.

According to Revera, the company that runs the facility, 19 of the 144 residents are currently in isolation for respiratory illness symptoms in two separate areas.

"I called my mother on FaceTime and we saw a worker coming into the room in full protective gear, face gear, and my mom said that they had moved her into isolation," her son said.

Mayor of town that has seen all Quebec's COVID-19 deaths feels left in dark

  Mayor of town that has seen all Quebec's COVID-19 deaths feels left in dark MONTREAL — The mayor of a Quebec town that has seen all four of the province's COVID-19 deaths to date says he is having trouble getting information from local health officials. Christian Goulet, the mayor of Lavaltrie, said he wishes he had more to tell his citizens about the novel coronavirus pandemic. Provincial health officials have said the four deaths are tied to a single seniors residence in the Lanaudiere region northeast of Montreal, and in a statement Monday, Goulet identified the EVA Lavaltrie as the site."People are extremely worried about the situation," Goulet said in an interview. The town has just over 14,000 residents.

"It wasn't until I was able to get ahold of the home when they actually explained they were in the process of sending out letters to families."

Family concerned that not all residents tested

He said his mother isn't doing well in isolation and says his family finds it "extremely concerning" that Alberta Health Services hasn't yet tested all residents.

He said his mother wasn't tested until Wednesday morning, and the family has yet to receive the results.

"If there's an outbreak in that home, everyone should be tested. They don't want this to balloon into something insane," he said.

"As a family member, I'm deeply concerned they're not doing enough to protect them."

A spokesperson with AHS confirmed in an email to CBC News that only those with symptoms are being tested at this time, while all others are being "closely monitored."

Outbreak at care home for adults with developmental disabilities

As of late Wednesday afternoon, the province said there were 419 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Alberta — with  61 new cases, many among vulnerable populations.

'We need it more than toilet paper': Canadian Blood Services seeks donations amid COVID-19 pandemic

  'We need it more than toilet paper': Canadian Blood Services seeks donations amid COVID-19 pandemic Krystina Roman — an avid blood donor since 2015 — keeps a timer on her phone to remind her to give blood. When it went off last week, she felt a bit of panic. After all, Canada and much of the world is in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. But that's exactly why she says she needed to keep her appointment. "I was thinking about the toilet paper rush and I was like, 'Wow what if we have a blood rush?'" she said. "I have friends who have cancer now. We need it more than toilet paper."But according to Canadian Blood Services, not everyone has been sharing that mindset.

In addition to the cases at the McKenzie Towne Continuing Care Centre, the province said nine cases in total had been identified in continuing care facilities, including one case in Rosedale on the Park and two at Shepherd's Care Kensington Campus, both in the Edmonton zone.

Another cluster of cases in Calgary has surfaced at the Nelson Home, a group home for persons with developmental disabilities, the province said Wednesday.

A caseworker and two residents have tested positive for COVID-19 and two other residents are symptomatic, the province said. All are self-isolating.

Staff following infection control protocols: Revera

In an email, Revera spokesperson Larry Roberts said the company was awaiting test results on the residents in isolation.

"In these isolated units, we actively monitor all residents and staff follow infection control protocols," Roberts said.

Staff have been instructed to do more frequent cleaning and disinfecting amidst the pandemic, Roberts said, and extra housekeeping crews are being brought in.

Social distancing is enforced by ensuring there is adequate spacing in common rooms. The facility has also cancelled all group recreation programming.

Revera began screening visitors and staff for illness on March 14 and has limited visitors since March 17.

The province has curtailed visitors in long-term care facilities to one per resident, except in situations involving dying family members.

AHS needs to do more to protect most vulnerable, son says

But the man whose mother's health is ailing says the moves made so far don't go far enough.

"We can't take the nonchalant approach," he said. "This is the time where we need to be taking extraordinary measures.

"If Alberta Health Services is really serious in fighting this thing, the most vulnerable is where we should be throwing the majority of our resources."

Emergency COVID-19 measures enacted for Canada's seniors' homes where pandemic hits hardest .
Fearing that elderly residents of long term care homes will suffer the worst mortality in the coronavirus pandemic, Canadian authorities have introduced emergency measures, from financial support in Quebec to a loosening of regulatory burdens in Ontario. The decisions come as new scientific evidence shows the virus spreads easily among asymptomatic people, so simply monitoring symptomatic residents may have left a crucial gap in the defence of care homes. Your browser does not support this video require(["binding"], function (binding) { binding("wcVideoPlayer", "#video_player_d655cc4f-63f9-40dd-91fe-47542787aaa1").

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!