•   
  •   
  •   

Canada Coronavirus: Blind, visually impaired Albertans adjust to limited touch restrictions

01:56  07 april  2020
01:56  07 april  2020 Source:   globalnews.ca

Alberta’s ‘energy war room’ sees budget cut by 90% amid coronavirus

  Alberta’s ‘energy war room’ sees budget cut by 90% amid coronavirus Oil prices have been steadily dropping since the coronavirus pandemic started, bringing with it a slew of cancellations, restrictions and shut downs of everything from pubs and bars to air travel. On Monday, prices were the lowest experts have seen since 2002.

"You can be awful lonely if you're living alone and you are visually impaired , and you're not out and your family doesn't stop to visit you." To combat this loneliness, Brown said anyone who needs someone to talk to can reach out to the Lethbridge Association for the Blind , and they will be there for

Actions to protect Albertans and prevent the spread of novel coronavirus . To protect the health and safety of Albertans , law enforcement agencies now have full New operational protocols, including limited visitation, are now enforceable for all nursing homes, designated supportive living and

a person that is standing in the snow: Christopher Warner, legally blind, is adapting to COVID-19 restrictions and limiting touch. April 6, 2020. © Kevin Billo Christopher Warner, legally blind, is adapting to COVID-19 restrictions and limiting touch. April 6, 2020.

Christopher Warner is used to challenges, the 48-year-old is legally blind. However, navigating the world around him under strict COVID-19 restrictions has made his day-to-day life even more of an adjustment.

"For now, I'm very much home-bound," Warner said.

"When you're used to navigating with touch and with help from others, and when we can't have too much contact, it becomes more a problem," Warner said.

READ MORE: Albertans who are blind, visually impaired urged to continue reaching out amid COVID-19 pandemic

Domestic violence on the rise in York Region amid COVID-19 crisis, police say

  Domestic violence on the rise in York Region amid COVID-19 crisis, police say Cases of domestic violence in York Region are on the rise with COVID-19 forcing people to spend more time inside, police say. Although overall crime was down 13 per cent in March 2020 compared to March 2019, domestic incidents — as well as cases of vehicle theft and stunt driving — have seen a spike in numbers. Below is a breakdown of crime that police say have increased since changes came into effect surrounding COVID-19: Commercial break andAlthough overall crime was down 13 per cent in March 2020 compared to March 2019, domestic incidents — as well as cases of vehicle theft and stunt driving — have seen a spike in numbers.

Coronavirus : These Countries, Airlines Restrict Travel to China. Bloomberg News. The outbreak of the coronavirus has prompted dozens of nations and airlines to restrict travel, increasingly isolating the country of more than 1.3 billion people.

Albertans who are abroad, including in Mexico and Italy, are figuring out how to get back to Canada as countries around the world begin to impose stricter travel restrictions to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Warner lost most of his sight in 2005 during surgery. He said when he woke he could only see light and shadows.

He since gained back some vision, but seeing all the fine details is still a struggle.

He uses a cane and his phone loaded with apps to help with direction, and when grocery shopping, Warner depends on touch.

"When we're not supposed to be touching as many things... that becomes a lot of harder," Warner said.

"We're in a very tactile world."

For many blind or partially-sighted people, touch can be critical said Warner -- especially when it comes to high-touch surfaces like elevator buttons and office doors.

But It's the human-to-human contact that Warner misses most.

A community educator with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB), Warner said he's used to visiting schools and seniors' homes -- but now he can't do any of that.

Three more COVID-19 deaths in Alberta brings total to 23; cases up to 1,250

  Three more COVID-19 deaths in Alberta brings total to 23; cases up to 1,250 As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to increase daily, so too does the number of deaths and hospitalizations in Alberta with three more deaths announced by the provincial government Sunday afternoon. The three newly reported deaths include a man from the Calgary zone in his 60s, a woman from the Central zone in her 80s and a man from the North zone who was more than 100 years old. The man in the Calgary zone was not a resident at the McKenzie Towne Continuing Care Centre, which has seen 10 of the province’s 23 deaths. Restrictions meant to encourage physical distancing remain in place, while people are still adjusting to the “new normal.

With coronavirus rapidly spreading and travel restricted to the US, airlines and passengers alike are navigating what to do next. But the details of the restrictions mean that Americans will be able to return home even if they do take their flight abroad as planned.

Today the Coronavirus has left public school systems and private schools scrambling to find alternative ways to continue to educate students for an extended period Free homework help hotline for students in the United States who are blind or visually impaired during the coronavirus / COVID 19 pandemic.

"There's nowhere to go out and do presentations," he said.

Despite the social distancing rules, Warner wants to make sure other blind and partially-sighted Albertans are still keeping in contact with others.

"Don't be afraid to reach out," he said.

READ MORE: Smartphone donations are changing the lives of the visually-impaired, CNIB says

To help combat isolation, the CNIB Foundation has moved all of its resources online, including the creation of new virtual content, executive director of CNIB Alberta, Andrew Galster said.

"We went from having a handful of virtual programs -- then in a span of a week -- we had 150 virtual programs available for Canadians with vision- loss," Galster said.

Galster said the silver-lining has been allowing access to people in rural areas who typically couldn't make it to in-person programs in Calgary or Edmonton.

"Now they can dial-in, they can jump on video," Galster said.

Alberta government distributes $92M in emergency isolation cash

  Alberta government distributes $92M in emergency isolation cash Nearly 80,000 people received emergency isolation support payments from the Alberta government to help with a pandemic cash crunch. The government paid out $91.7 million in emergency payments in less than two weeks, according to its website. That's nearly twice the $50 million the government estimated it would disburse. The government introduced the one-time, $1,146 bank transfers last month to help people who had to stay isolated, away fromThe government paid out $91.7 million in emergency payments in less than two weeks, according to its website. That's nearly twice the $50 million the government estimated it would disburse.

Russia is limiting flights to and from EU member countries, Norway and Switzerland over the COVID-19 pandemic now raging in Europe, exempting only regular flights from Moscow to their capital cities and charter evacuation trips.

You can adjust your Cookie Preferences at the bottom of this page. AliExpress carries many for the blind visually impaired related products, including outdoor stick , bracelet man watch , cane for the elderly , vision watch , men watch , blind cane , stick walk , 40mm men watch , elder watch , cane for

The Virtual Vision Mate is one of CNIB's new online programs. Galster said the program has helped isolated seniors connect with strangers for virtual coffee-dates.

"Some of them have been saying they're getting quite a kick out of it, and saying they've been enjoying actually connecting with folks."

READ MORE: Edmonton family reacts to Alberta hospital visit ban amid COVID-19 pandemic: ‘It’s heartbreaking’

The virtual programs offer free career support, technology training, youth groups and book clubs.

Galster said volunteers have also been helping the CNIB with grocery and other deliveries.

"When there's no other choice, it's incredible what people can accomplish."

Warner said the blind and partially-sighted are also counting on others to look out for them.

"We may not be aware that you're there, so we may not be as good at social distancing," Warner said.

"We kind of rely on a sighted-person to keep their distancing from us."

Ontario reports 401 new coronavirus cases, including 21 deaths as total cases top 7,000 .
The death toll has risen to 274. The number of resolved cases in the province sits at 3,121, or about 44 per cent of all cases. Sunday’s increase in cases marks a six per cent jump compared to the day prior. That number has gone down over the past several days. READ MORE: Coronavirus: ‘Zero tolerance’ for those who disobey physical distancing, Toronto police chief says Saturday saw a 6.6 per cent increase. The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 is 738, with 261 in intensive care and 196 on a ventilator.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!