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Canada The lottery curse: How the unfathomable good fortune of winning $50M can go terribly wrong

13:15  23 may  2020
13:15  23 may  2020 Source:   nationalpost.com

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His experience as a $ 50 -million target has given him a new purpose in life, as he is set to publish his memoir and commission others, trying to turn On this theory, the victims of the lottery curse would probably have gone off the rails anyway, but without all that money and fame, no one would notice.

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a man wearing a suit and sunglasses posing for the camera: Randall Rush won $50-million in an Alberta lottery in 2015. © Rebecca Blissett Randall Rush won $50-million in an Alberta lottery in 2015.

What would you do if you won $50-million in the lottery?

Would you play it safe, follow the official guidance, not move right away, give a little to your friends and charity, invest and save, change the locks, de-list your phone number, make social media private, and tell the lottery people you won’t be paraded before the whole world as a million-dollar mark?

Or would you join the ranks of those whose experiences with unfathomable luck have left the cultural impression, rich in schadenfreude, that a big lottery win is a veiled curse?

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Six victims of the lottery curse : people whose 'lucky' lottery win led to divorce, bankruptcy, or even How could that happen? Post spent his money wildly. The majority of the first yearly installment of his Although these lottery curse stories make it seem like winning money is the worst thing that

Sometimes a little bit of self discipline can go a long long ways. That’s especially true for people who win the lottery . I mean, let’s say you win a crap ton of money, like 200 million dollars ….cue up the A fiduciary is obligated to give you objective advice about how to go about managing your new fortune .

Examples abound in the Canadian experience, and not all are tragic moral outrages like the 2003 manslaughter of Ibi Roncaioli of Toronto, by her physician husband Joseph, who gave her anesthetic injections, years after her $5-million lottery win had been squandered and lost.

Some are funny, like the two hapless weed dealers from St. Catharines, Ont., who went to trial to determine whether one of them bought a $5-million scratch ticket for himself or both of them, while the other guy waited outside the convenience store in his mom’s car. Faced with this question, the presiding judge observed: “If the ticket were a child and the parties vying for custody, I would find them both unfit and bring in Family and Children’s Services.”

Some are epic. The Lavigueur family of Montreal won $7.5-million in 1986 and were soon plagued by early deaths, a suicide, lawsuits, opportunists, and eventually a miniseries that dramatized their mansion burning down after it was bought by an outlaw biker.

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Watch more How to Make Money Fast videos: http Step 1: Mix up your numbers When you're picking numbers, try to get a good mix of odds, evens, highs, and lows. Tip Check your state's official lottery web site for information about payouts and how to claim winnings , or call the office directly to clarify.

Winning the lottery can be a huge, life-changing event. Imagine you'd just won millions of pounds - what would you do with the cash? We can also show you how to increase your chances of winning big if your numbers do come through. Feeling lucky? Here are 8 tips that may just help boost your

Most famous was Raymond Sobeski of Ontario who won $30-million in 2004, did not tell his wife, got a divorce, claimed the win, became a villain in the media, got sued by the wife, sued her lawyer and a newspaper, settled with the wife before trial, got back together with her, and kept on fighting all the way to Ontario’s top court.

Randall “Randy” Rush, 53, thinks he did pretty well, all things considered. And there is a lot to consider, lotto-wise, because Rush did more than fend off efforts to defraud him after his $50-million Alberta lottery win in 2015.

His experience as a $50-million target has given him a new purpose in life, as he is set to publish his memoir and commission others, trying to turn himself into a powerful champion for victims of financial scammers.

a person holding a sign:  Randall Rush with his cheque. © Codie McLachlan/Edmonton Sun/QMI Agency Randall Rush with his cheque.

“There’s no John Walsh out there of white-collar crime,” Rush said in an interview, referring to the man who created America’s Most Wanted and became an anti-crime activist after his son Adam’s murder in 1981.

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We have collected the true, terribly sad stories of lotto winners that show that winning the lottery , despite the seeming wonderfulness of having some $ 500 Interestingly, the psychology that draws us to lotteries is the low-risk factor: While you might win big, your life goes on virtually unchanged if you

Winning the lottery is probably one of the quickest, most surefire ways to ruin your life—we’re Banking on winning the lottery is about as ridiculous as it gets. Do you really want to waste your And that’s going to feel pretty good ! You might even feel like you got a raise when you see how

Rush’s origin story as a lottery winner superhero seeking vengeance on fraudsters began soon after his win, when Rush got involved with a man pitching an investment opportunity, a company that would be the next Amazon, the next Facebook, and it just so happened that this man was the son of Rush’s friends from church. What are the odds? Here was a chance to help friends and “diversify” his assets at the same time, Rush said.

He was in a good mood right after winning. Obviously. He did the press conference, the shopping spree, the luxury travel. Several people approached him for investment, but his plan was to play it cool for a while. He had what he called a “checklist” of what not to do. But he immediately quit his job at a heavy equipment rental company in Edmonton, where he had been making well into six figures.

The “Would you quit your job if you won the lotto?” question is a common interest of human resources consultants, as a measure of attitude. Among actual winners, surveys have noted a historically increasing majority of lottery winners who keep working. On the whole, what research exists suggests big lottery winners are no happier than the general population, and occasionally a lot less so.

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If you won the lottery , how would you spend your money? This is a common conversation starter among This win couldn't have come at a better time considering Rodriguez had filed for bankruptcy the If you don't believe in curses , tell that to Jack Whittaker. Whittaker is one of the most infamous

' Winning the lottery isn’t always what it’s cracked up to be. Everybody wanted my money. She donated much of her fortune to the University of Washington and the school used to build a new library. But just eight years after collecting her prize, she filed for bankruptcy in 2001.

It often starts with a story like this. Within a few weeks, Rush was investing in this man’s mobile phone app that linked online shopping to social media. Eventually he was in for a total of $4.6-million. A few months later he was suing, first in the United States, then in Canada, claiming he was lied to about the company being on track for tens of millions in revenue.

 Randall Rush participates in a press conference at the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission in St. Albert, Alberta, on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. © Codie McLachlan/Edmonton Sun/QMI Agency Randall Rush participates in a press conference at the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission in St. Albert, Alberta, on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015.

The story played out in courts in Alberta and Arizona and is now mostly resolved in Rush’s favour, leaving nothing but a documentary trail of wild details about expensive cars, failed schemes, and a corporate launch party on the roof of a swish hotel, with beats by a lower-tier DJ, and no sign of Justin Timberlake or Taylor Swift, as Rush claims he was led to expect.

There is a bit of a Tiger King vibe in the court record, with all that small city swagger, flashy cars, expensive baseball caps, big nights out in Vegas, men like peacocks,  each playing the other until it all falls apart.

Lottery winners are not your usual rich people, not at first anyway. Rush’s new book, 13 Billion To One: Winning The $50 Million Lottery Has Its Price, out soon, is dedicated to his cat, Conway Kitty, “Who’s been there from the start and loves me for me.” (Conway Twitty was a country music star, and the cat was with Rush, who was getting cat food, when he checked his numbers in a St. Albert grocery store.)

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In the interview, Rush described learning some hard lessons. Some of his friends were worse off because of his donations to their bank accounts. One was a gambler, for whom cash was like gasoline on the fire.

“It was a very hard lesson in what giving is,” he said.

He said it taught him that quick money amplifies character, including a person’s flaws and weaknesses. Money “makes you a bigger person of who you are,” he said.

On this theory, the victims of the lottery curse would probably have gone off the rails anyway, but without all that money and fame, no one would notice.

a person posing for the camera:  Randall Rush seen at a press conference at the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission in St. Albert, Alberta, on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. © Codie McLachlan/Edmonton Sun/QMI Agency Randall Rush seen at a press conference at the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission in St. Albert, Alberta, on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015.

H. Roy Kaplan, a sociologist at the University of South Florida, and a leading authority in the field, has found that lottery wins make introverts more anxious and suspicious of others. So did $50-million make Rush more like himself? Is he happier now?

“Absolutely” he said. Asked about his friends, he mentions his bankers.

Rush acknowledges he went through an “angry phase,” but denies that his new efforts to become an anti-scammer media star are motivated by vengeance.

But Rantanna Media, as he has named his publishing company (mixing his name with Carlos Santana’s), looks a lot like a rich man’s idle revenge. More than a mere vanity project, it looks like a passion project. His first book about his former business partner is called Bloodsuckers. He is looking to expand into books about abuse in evangelical Christianity, which he describes as a similar breach of trust.

“This is business,” he said. “This is completing a project.”

• Email: jbrean@nationalpost.com | Twitter: josephbrean

Winner sought after $24M-winning Lotto 6/49 ticket sold in Aldergrove .
Did you recently buy a Lotto 6/49 ticket in Aldergrove? Better check your numbers. The winning ticket for the May 27 draw was sold at an undisclosed location in Aldergrove and matched all six numbers: 7, 17, 18, 22, 28, and 34. The best number of all is the winning total: $24 million. The B.C. Lottery Corporation is not releasing the name of the retail shop where the ticket was purchased until a winner comes forward to claim the grand prize. The winner has 52 weeks from the date of the draw to claim their cash, the corporation said Thursday. The most recent B.C. winner for the Lotto 6/49 was Tibor Tusnady, who snagged $16 million in the April 15 draw earlier this year.

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