•   
  •   
  •   

Canada In scramble to reopen schools, after-school child care is often left out of the mix

17:46  01 september  2020
17:46  01 september  2020 Source:   cbc.ca

Washington dropped its racist nickname, but it's still used at nearly 100 middle schools, high schools

  Washington dropped its racist nickname, but it's still used at nearly 100 middle schools, high schools National Congress of American Indians examined K-12 schools with Native American mascots, nicknames and found 98 still use the racial slur.NBA 2K 101 with BearDaBeast

Those providing child care before and after school are scrambling to prepare their facilities to protect kids from COVID-19 under guidelines released just last week. The after - school program, which requires Audrey to take a school bus to another location, includes children from other schools .

After closing schools to prevent the spread of COVID-19, countries from Denmark to Japan have started to reopen their classrooms, with new Coronavirus lockdown measures have partially or fully closed schools for more than 90% of the world's student population across 186 countries and

Sending kids back to classrooms this fall is a decision many families are grappling with, but before- and after-school child care is another complicating factor in the equation, especially for parents who work outside the home.

Christine Ens and her husband, Matt Miles, decided to send their daughter, Audrey, back to school in part because the only child has missed socializing with friends and classmates. However, Audrey, who is almost seven, won't be returning to her after-school program.

Centralized virtual schools and synchronous delivery: How remote learning is shaping up for fall

  Centralized virtual schools and synchronous delivery: How remote learning is shaping up for fall Myriad Canadians got a rough introduction to online education when the pandemic closed classrooms this spring and forced educators into rapid implementation of "emergency learning at home." Now, as Canadian school districts grapple with a physical return to class in September, many are making plans for remote instruction, too. Thousands of families across Canada have opted to continue with distance schooling, but questions remain about what that will entail. We tried to find answers to some of them: What will virtual school look like? In different regions, districts are centralizing their virtual offerings.

Some nations have reopened their schools already, citing evidence that their outbreaks are under control. Many have issued new safety requirements. Denmark, one of the countries cited by Trump, closed its schools on March 11. Just a month later, it became the first country in Europe to reopen

It’s possible that schools may reopen for a period of time and then a decision may be made to Will any of the school ’s safeguarding and bullying policies change once schools start to re - open ? These guidelines set out the questions that should be asked, and the steps that should be taken

"We were thinking about the risk and the exposure she would have," the Winnipeg mother said, noting that school alone will put the second-grader in a cohort of up to 75 people.

A cohort is a group of students who remain together throughout the school day to minimize exposure to other groups, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ideally, teachers and staffers would also remain with a specific cohort.

The after-school program, which requires Audrey to take a school bus to another location, includes children from other schools. "Her risk and her bubble becomes just exponentially larger," Ens said.

Ens and her husband are adjusting their work schedules to support the decision, but they acknowledge that not everyone is as fortunate.

As school year nears, some warn Canada 'lagging behind' on approving COVID-19 saliva tests

  As school year nears, some warn Canada 'lagging behind' on approving COVID-19 saliva tests Giving a school-aged child an invasive, uncomfortable nasal swab test for COVID-19 might be tricky. Asking them to spit in a cup? It could be a simpler approach. That's the thought process behind calls from both researchers and public health officials to launch saliva tests in schools. But despite international efforts to make this option a reality, there's still no word on when saliva-based testing for COVID-19 will be allowed in Canada. "School is just around the corner, and I feel like we're lagging behind," said researcher Dr.

Schools didn’t just rely on online lessons, they also had other work sent home and so on. But we did procure one of the biggest procurement of computers in When Rashford first launched his campaign, Downing Street rejected it and ministers were sent out to publicly defend the government’s position.

Schools & Child Care plus icon. Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website.

"Before- and after-school care is a huge issue for families. It's difficult to find, and it's difficult to co-ordinate," she said. "The folks who are involved and invested in education decisions really needed to think through the child-care challenge that families are facing."

School reopenings have been a logistical and operational challenge for those running school-aged care programs.

Guidelines for daycare operators often seem to conflict with the guidelines for school divisions and boards, said Amy O'Neil, director of Treetop Children's Centre, which operates inside Toronto's Oriole Park Junior Public School.

Cohorts are one of the areas of inconsistency, she said. Large class sizes in schools have sparked heated discussion, but O'Neil said not enough attention has been paid to caregiver-to-student ratios and the mixing of school populations and age groups that typically happen in school-age care.

Without new federal funding, some Ontario First Nations may close schools until 2021

  Without new federal funding, some Ontario First Nations may close schools until 2021 Two First Nation high schools in northwestern Ontario will not reopen in September because of a lack of funding to mitigate the risk of transmitting COVID-19, according to the Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN). Pelican Falls education centre near Sioux Lookout and Dennis Franklin Cromarty high school in Thunder Bay have pushed back their fall opening until the end of October, said NAN deputy grand chief Derek Fox. Without additional funding and with no other resources to institute pandemic protocols, some of the 49 First Nations in NAN may cancel the entire first semester at schools in their communities, Fox said. "It's negligence.

She is concerned that the urgent needs of children who have not physically attended school for many months are getting lost. “I feel like we are treating kids They contend that political leaders are putting the needs of the economy above their safety and pushing schools to reopen without adequate

Hundreds of thousands of children and young people across England are set to resume their classes at schools and colleges from Tuesday after months of Face coverings will be mandatory in communal areas and corridors at schools and colleges within areas of the country deemed at high risk of

Ontario and British Columbia have, for example, urged on-site care providers to work with school officials to apply protocols. Keeping students with their same school-day cohorts during before- and after-school care is recommended, but both governments have acknowledged that won't always be possible.

Ontario and British Columbia have urged keeping students in their school cohorts during before- and after-school programs, but both governments have acknowledged that won't always be possible.  © Silvia Izquierdo/The Associated Press Ontario and British Columbia have urged keeping students in their school cohorts during before- and after-school programs, but both governments have acknowledged that won't always be possible.

"I hear what you are saying [with] mixing the groups of kids. But I know the ministers work diligently with the boards and each board is gonna come up with their own plan," Ontario Premier Doug Ford said when asked about these concerns on Friday, during his daily press briefing.

"We understand parents' concerns about the number of people their kids come into contact with," a spokesperson for B.C.'s Ministry of Education told CBC News on Friday.

"Every open, licensed child-care facility in B.C. has a COVID-19 safety plan in place to keep children, families and staff safe and healthy.... We'll be carefully monitoring child care in September and will make adjustments as needed."

Hundreds of Quebec teachers express dissatisfaction with government as schools reopen: CBC questionnaire

  Hundreds of Quebec teachers express dissatisfaction with government as schools reopen: CBC questionnaire With the start of school just days away in Quebec, teachers and other education workers around the province say the school system is still not prepared to resume in-class teaching amid the threat of COVID-19. Nearly 2,000 teachers, principals and other education workers in public schools filled out an email questionnaire circulated last week by CBC Montreal and Radio-Canada. Their responses indicate deep-seated concerns about their personal safety, high levels of anxiety, confusion about government guidelines and widespread dissatisfaction with Quebec Education Minister Jean-François Roberge.

If schools do not reopen , parents cannot go back to work. So how Germany and other countries that have led the way on many fronts handle this stage in Denmark, after letting younger children back more than three weeks ago, announced last week that the reproduction factor of the virus remained

All schools and universities will remain closed until March 15, officials said. On the West Coast of the United States, the region with the most American Parents have lost wages, tried to work at home or scrambled to find child care . Some have moved children to new schools in areas unaffected by the

O'Neil said she worries that if provinces don't expressly mandate it, "operators and principals are left to their own devices as to how and if they will cohort."

a woman standing in front of a building: Provinces have issued guidelines for daycare operators that sometimes conflict with their guidelines for school districts and boards, says Amy O'Neil, director of Treetop Children's Centre in Toronto. © Jonathan Castell/CBC Provinces have issued guidelines for daycare operators that sometimes conflict with their guidelines for school districts and boards, says Amy O'Neil, director of Treetop Children's Centre in Toronto.

Daycare providers across the country have a lengthy list of concerns over school reopenings, including a lack of consultation and co-ordination with the child-care community on developing reopening guidelines and procedures, said Martha Friendly, founder and executive director of the Childcare Resource and Research Unit, a policy group based in Toronto.

School-aged child care in particular has been "an afterthought," she said.

"It's not considered part of the child's and parent's day, despite conditions such as the size of groups and space for the class or program being pretty similar" to school itself.

'We know there can't be zero risk'

Cohorts have been incorporated as part of a successful suite of school reopening strategies in other countries, said epidemiologist Cynthia Carr, founder of EPI Research Inc.

She said that having defined, separated groups of students helps to minimize chains of transmission and lets officials more quickly identify and isolate those who might be affected if there is a positive COVID-19 case, without necessarily having to completely shut down a school.

Feds to give provinces $2B to bolster safe reopening of schools this fall

  Feds to give provinces $2B to bolster safe reopening of schools this fall OTTAWA — The federal government is providing up to $2 billion in additional funding to help provinces and territories ensure that kids can safely return to class this fall. The money is on top of $19 billion Ottawa has already promised to help them cope with the ongoing impact the COVID-19 pandemic is having on their economies and health-care systems. Education is not a federal responsibility and provinces are responsible for their own school reopening plans, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Wednesday, but he said he also wanted to calm the fears of parents by ensuring the provinces have additional resources to make schools safe.

WATCH | An epidemiologist offers advice for before- and after-school programs:

Consistent protocols between schools and before- and after-school programs makes sense, said Winnipeg-based Carr.

"The age groups at higher risk of spread should have the same rules, whether it's a daycare or a school, because you're still talking about the same enclosed space. You're still talking about duration of exposure."

While "within the school context, we know there can't be zero risk," Carr said that what's most important is that operators of school-aged care facilities enact the many layers of safety measures — from maintaining physical distancing and masking to increased cleaning and attention to ventilation — in order to get down to the lowest risk possible.

A student's school cohort might in effect be "broken" due to conditions in before- or after-school care, Carr said, but that can also happen if, for example, that student plays on an outside sports team or mixes in different social or family settings as well.

The work establishing school cohorts isn't completely negated if students end up alongside kids outside those defined groups — say, when taking the bus or during after-school care — provided that safety protocols are being followed in each of those different areas they access, said Dr. Monika Dutt, a public health expert and family physician in Sydney, N.S.

"Understandably, many caregivers and parents are really worried.... At the same time, I would say there are really strong guidelines — from what I've seen and what I've been working with — that are given to daycares, after-school programs, schools and camps."

As a baseline, we all need to work at keeping community transmission as low as possible and to follow public health guidance, Dutt said.

Care providers can additionally work toward consistency by keeping the same students and staff together all year in before- and after-school care, she said, adding that regular communication between schools, parents and school-age caregivers this fall will be key.

Care operators "don't want children to be sick. They don't want staff to get sick. You want your family to stay as safe as possible," Dutt said.

"We're all trying to accomplish the same goals, in a way that allows people to be able to go to work and children to be able to to learn in school settings."

Plan for inevitable COVID-19 cases in schools, says chief public health officer .
OTTAWA — Canada's chief public health officer says families should expect to see cases of COVID-19 in schools as children head back to class. It is important that each school have a plan and that everyone knows what to do when there's an outbreak of the novel coronavirus, Dr. Theresa Tam told a news briefing Friday. It's normal to feel stressed about the fact many students are returning to classrooms, she said. But planning and awareness will help reduce anxiety. "I do think that people should expect to come across cases in the school year, because this is inevitable," Tam said.

usr: 3
This is interesting!