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Canada Fishermen to haul traps in Nova Scotia Indigenous lobster fishery

22:11  19 september  2020
22:11  19 september  2020 Source:   msn.com

Lobster protests: Nova Scotia MP demands immediate action from Ottawa

  Lobster protests: Nova Scotia MP demands immediate action from Ottawa HALIFAX — A Nova Scotia MP is demanding Ottawa step in to quell rising anger among lobster fishermen who are accusing Indigenous fishermen of illegally trapping and selling lobster out of season. Chris d'Entremont, the Conservative MP for West Nova, sent a letter to Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan on Wednesday, saying he is worried about the safety of his constituents. On Tuesday, hundreds of non-Indigenous commercial fishermen stagedChris d'Entremont, the Conservative MP for West Nova, sent a letter to Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan on Wednesday, saying he is worried about the safety of his constituents.

An official with Nova Scotia 's Sipekne'katik First Nation is reporting no significant incidents as band fishermen prepare to haul lobster traps today in the western Some non- Indigenous fishermen say they believe the Indigenous fishery is illegal because the regular fishing season is now closed.

Indigenous fishermen set their traps Thursday, 21 years after the Supreme Court of Canada decided Donald Marshall Jr. had a treaty right to fish for eels On Saturday, Indigenous fishermen set up a set up a blockade of rope and lobster traps at each end of the wharf in Saulnierville, N.S., in what

a large ship in a body of water © Provided by The Canadian Press

SAULNIERVILLE, N.S. — An official with Nova Scotia's Sipekne'katik First Nation is reporting no significant incidents as band fishermen prepare to haul lobster traps today in the western part of the province.

Rhonda Knockwood, the First Nation's director of operations, says fishermen plan leave the wharf in Saulnierville, N.S., to retrieve traps set earlier this week.

Knockwood says the situation has remained relatively peaceful because of the police presence in the area.

Nova Scotia First Nation launches lobster fleet amid tension on the wharf

  Nova Scotia First Nation launches lobster fleet amid tension on the wharf SAULNIERVILLE, N.S. — A First Nation in Nova Scotia launched its own lobster fishing fleet today, in defiance of federal regulations that say the fishery is closed for the season. About 200 people gathered at the wharf in Saulnierville, N.S., as a ceremony was held to bless the fleet before fishermen set out as part of the Sipekne'katik First Nation's self-regulated fishery. The band has issued five licences, each allowing for the setting of 50 lobster traps, and band officials say three boats are expected to go out today.

Non- Indigenous fishermen say they are in the process of removing lobster traps set by fishermen from the Sipekne'katik First Nation in waters off western Members of the Sipekne'katik First Nation load lobster traps on the wharf in Saulnierville, N.S., after launching its own self-regulated fishery on

Unsubscribe anytime or contact us for details. Lobster fishing in Nova Scotia is causing all sorts of chaos this week after non- Indigenous fishermen An historic moment. The first lobster caught in Sipekne’katik FN’s moderate livelihood fishery . The traps were cut, Mi’kmaq are dragging for traps .

RCMP spokesman, Sgt. Andrew Joyce, says there were no incidents reported overnight Friday, and Mounties continue to patrol on the water and in the air.

Police arrested two people on assault charges Friday following reports of ugly confrontations over the First Nation's commercial lobster fishing operation.

Some non-Indigenous fishermen say they believe the business is illegal because the regular fishing season is now closed, but the Sipekne'katik First Nation says their people have a treaty right to fish at any time.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 19, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Ottawa affirms Mi'kmaq treaty rights in Nova Scotia lobster dispute .
SAULNIERVILLE, N.S. — The federal government is affirming the Mi'kmaq First Nation's treaty rights in an ongoing dispute with non-Indigenous fishermen in southwestern Nova Scotia. Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan and Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett released a statement Monday saying the Mi'kmaq have a constitutionally protected treaty right to fish in pursuit of a moderate livelihood. Non-Indigenous fishermen have been protesting the Indigenous fishers' attempts to set lobster traps in St. Marys Bay during the off-season, which runs until the end of November.

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