•   
  •   
  •   

Canada 'Everything has changed': N.B. doctor describes racism after COVID-19 outbreak

21:05  20 september  2020
21:05  20 september  2020 Source:   msn.com

Covington taking Woodley seriously, says fight won't be a 'cakewalk'

  Covington taking Woodley seriously, says fight won't be a 'cakewalk' Colby Covington may not like Tyron Woodley, but he doesn't believe Saturday's grudge match will be an easy night at the office. "Chaos" is being pegged as a 3-1 betting favorite in the UFC Fight Night main event in Las Vegas, seemingly because Woodley has lost his last two contests. However, the former interim champion thinks the bout might be closer than the odds indicate and believes it's important to ignore Woodley's critics. "I can't look at"Chaos" is being pegged as a 3-1 betting favorite in the UFC Fight Night main event in Las Vegas, seemingly because Woodley has lost his last two contests.

After months of harassment and racist remarks, the doctor at the centre of a COVID - 19 controversy that rocked New Brunswick says his life has been changed entirely. Dr . Jean Robert Ngola, a physician of Congolese descent

Dr . Robert Jean Ngola says a deluge of harassment and racist taunts followed him, both online and in-person, as part of the fallout from allegations he After months of harassment and racist remarks, the doctor at the centre of a COVID - 19 controversy that rocked New Brunswick says his life has been

a man wearing a suit and tie © Provided by The Canadian Press

After months of harassment and racist remarks, the doctor at the centre of a COVID-19 controversy that rocked New Brunswick says his life has been changed entirely.

Dr. Jean Robert Ngola, a physician of Congolese descent, said in a recent interview the fallout from allegations he was "patient zero" responsible for an outbreak put him under an uncomfortable spotlight.

"Since May ... everything has changed in my life," Ngola said by phone.

Silver lining? Cases of infectious diseases plunge amid anti-COVID measures

  Silver lining? Cases of infectious diseases plunge amid anti-COVID measures TORONTO — Lockdowns and other tough measures implemented to fight the COVID-19 pandemic have led to a dramatic decline in other infectious illnesses such as influenza and sexually transmitted infections, public health data suggest. While experts say delayed diagnoses likely contributed to the drop in reported cases, the numbers are nevertheless stark. For example, the normal incidence of influenza, which typically kills about 8,000 Canadians a year when combined with pneumonia, dropped suddenly in mid-March as anti-pandemic restrictions kept people at home and idled businesses.

How COVID - 19 progresses from incubation to recovery has implications for everything from how long people may spread it before showing symptoms The onset of ARDS has been reported to average eight or 11 days after symptoms begin (about one to three days after hospital admission) in Chinese

Covid - 19 has certainly been a serious disease, but the flu epidemics of 1957 and 1967 were just as bad, if not worse, with regard to total fatalities. They were both over a million, and Covid has a long way to go to match that. In addition, in those epidemics far more younger people died.

And now he wants the province to investigate his case to ensure nobody else endures a similar fate.

On May 27, in the face of a growing outbreak in Campbellton, N.B., Premier Blaine Higgs referred to an "irresponsible" health-care worker and said the matter was being handled by the RCMP. The outbreak eventually affected 40 people and resulted in two deaths.

News got out that Ngola, a family doctor working in the northern New Brunswick town at the time, was the suspect in the RCMP's investigation after his positive COVID-19 status was leaked on social media.

Ngola says a deluge of harassment and racist taunts followed, both online and in person, as the investigation unfolded into an overnight trip he took to Quebec.

Before he tested positive, Ngola had driven to Montreal to pick up his daughter, because her mother was travelling to Africa to attend a funeral.

The latest developments on COVID-19 in Canada

  The latest developments on COVID-19 in Canada The latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada (all times Eastern): 4:45 p.m. Alberta Health Services says 14 patients and four staff members have tested positive for the novel coronavirus at the Foothills Medical Centre. One patient has died in the outbreaks linked to the cardiac care and general medicine units. AHS says 57 staff who work in those units are in isolation. Visits aren't permitted on the affected units except in end-of-life situations. AHS says contact tracing is underway and the situation is being closely monitored. --- 3:58 p.m.

The service links COVID - 19 related data like a health questionnaire and temperature check to assess whether someone is Covid - 19 could perhaps more accurately be called ’Covid-1984’ for all the restrictive But so too would almost everything that has happened this year in the UK, and beyond.

Dealing with mental health after COVID - 19 . COVID - 19 doesn’t just take a toll on the body. It also can take a mental toll, since there’s so much fear centered Typically, doctors diagnose mental health disorders only if certain criteria are met. But now we’re living in a situation that has touched everyone

On his way back to New Brunswick, he met with two colleagues in the Trois-Rivieres, Que., area before completing his trip, according to his lawyer, Joel Etienne. He did not self-isolate for two weeks when he returned, as provincial health guidelines direct, but Ngola has said that was consistent with the practice of other physicians at his hospital.

After it was revealed that Ngola was the health worker being investigated, he was suspended from his job at the hospital in Campbellton. Ngola said he had to disconnect his phone because people were harassing him, telling him to "go back to Africa" and calling him a "refugee."

Although he had already been planning to move to Quebec, Ngola hastened his departure because he didn't feel safe in Campbellton, he said.

"I was one of the good physicians, I think, in this small city. Everybody knew me in Campbellton," he said. "But in my own city, I cannot work. Even now I cannot go to my house."

Top 10 Martin Scorsese Films

  Top 10 Martin Scorsese Films It’s the 30th anniversary of Martin Scorsese’s mobster masterpiece, “Goodfellas.” So with apologies to Joe Pesci’s gangster psychopath, Tommy DeVito, we’re here “to amuse you” with our Top 10 films from America’s greatest living filmmaker.

The COVID - 19 pandemic has impacted the mental health of people around the world. The Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee of the United

COVID - 19 is a new strain of coronavirus that has not been previously identified in humans. It was first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, where it has caused a large and ongoing outbreak . Make sure you follow recommendations from the manufacturer for pump cleaning after each use.

Recently, however, he has been heartened after receiving a letter of support from fellow doctors in Canada. It was a sign, he said, that he "wasn't alone" as he continued to deal with the allegations against him. Though the RCMP investigation was dropped, Ngola still faces a charge of violating the province's Emergency Measures Act and has a court date Oct. 26.

"It was so emotional," Ngola said of the letter. "My tears flowed."

The letter was the work of Danusha Foster, an Ontario family doctor who followed Ngola's case and felt he was "unfairly targeted."

She said in an interview from Guelph, Ont., that she used an online social network to enlist hundreds of other signatories from across the country. She said the effort was intended as a private show of support, and the other physicians have not agreed to have their names made public.

Now, Etienne and his associates are calling for a probe into the handling of Ngola's case. After his initial positive test, Ngola had three tests come back negative, possibly indicating a false positive, his team argues, which would make it impossible for him to have triggered the outbreak.

Ottawa affirms Mi'kmaq treaty rights in Nova Scotia lobster dispute

  Ottawa affirms Mi'kmaq treaty rights in Nova Scotia lobster dispute SAULNIERVILLE, N.S. — The federal government is affirming the Mi'kmaq First Nation's treaty rights in an ongoing dispute with non-Indigenous fishermen in southwestern Nova Scotia. Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan and Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett released a statement Monday saying the Mi'kmaq have a constitutionally protected treaty right to fish in pursuit of a moderate livelihood. Non-Indigenous fishermen have been protesting the Indigenous fishers' attempts to set lobster traps in St. Marys Bay during the off-season, which runs until the end of November.

The Covid - 19 pandemic has reshaped our personal relationships in unprecedented ways, forcing us to live closer together with some people and further Most notably the high-pressure environment of confinement, combined with the financial stress brought about by a Covid - 19 burdened economy, has

COVID - 19 . Explore the latest strategic trends, research and analysis. We know this from many examples, ranging from absenteeism in military units after deployment in risk areas, companies that were close to Ground Zero in 9/11 and medical professionals in regions with outbreaks of Ebola

His lawyers say the province failed in its responsibilities to protect Ngola's privacy and perform proper contact tracing for the Campbellton outbreak.

Ngola said he thinks an inquiry is necessary to protect others who may find themselves in similar circumstances as the pandemic continues.

"We have to know what happened to prevent (this) for the future, because discrimination is not tolerable, not acceptable, in Canada," he said.

He is now practising in Louiseville in central Quebec, and the hostility he faced in Campbellton has been replaced by a warm embrace.

Yvon Deshaies, the town's mayor, says people in the community who've come across Ngola at the local emergency clinic are happy to have him in the area.

Deshaies says it's not always easy attracting doctors to smaller towns like his, so New Brunswick's loss is his region's gain.

"He came here, and I'm happy about it," Deshaies said. "People who've had a chance to meet with him are happy with Dr. Ngola."

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 20, 2020.

— With files from Sidhartha Banerjee

— — —

This story was produced with the financial assistance of the Facebook and Canadian Press News Fellowship.

Danielle Edwards, The Canadian Press

COMMENTARY: Justin Trudeau doesn’t have much to gain from an election right now .
What could be the most significant court hearing yet in the high-profile Joe Clyde Daniels case is scheduled for Thursday.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!