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Canada Refresh of Liberal government's agenda comes amid new looming COVID-19 crisis

20:01  23 september  2020
20:01  23 september  2020 Source:   msn.com

Liberals Haven't Consulted With Opposition Parties On Throne Speech

  Liberals Haven't Consulted With Opposition Parties On Throne Speech OTTAWA — If Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is trying to avoid a fall election, he hasn’t sought the opposition’s ideas for what to include in his minority government’s renewed agenda. Trudeau told reporters outside the cabinet’s in-person two-day retreat in Ottawa that the Liberals have been engaging with the opposition parties throughout the crisis. “They have made public their reflections around what they would like to see going forward. We’ve been engaging them on multiple levels, we will continue to engage,” he said. “I think it is important for Canadians to see their different orders of government working together.

How the Liberal government intends to ride the coming second wave of the COVID - 19 pandemic will become clear Wednesday as it lays out a three-pronged approach in a hotly-anticipated speech from the throne certain to set the tone for the coming months in Parliament. In what’ s expected to be an

Refresh of Liberal government ’ s agenda comes amid new looming COVID - 19 crisis - Comox Valley Record. But the real toll is thought to be much higher, in part because many COVID - 19 deaths were probably ascribed to other causes, especially early on, before widespread testing.

a group of people in a room © Provided by The Canadian Press

OTTAWA — How the Liberal government intends to ride the coming second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic will become clear today as it lays out a three-pronged approach in a hotly anticipated speech from the throne certain to set the tone for the coming months in Parliament.

In what's expected to be an address lasting as long as an hour, Gov. Gen. Julie Payette will detail the government's plans in three areas: dealing with the urgent crisis of the current surge in cases, continuing and changing support for Canadians and businesses still not back on their feet, and what will come once the economy is better able to stand on its own.

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COVID - 19 : The Great Reset is written and published in the midst of a crisis whose consequences will unfold over many years to come . Little wonder that we all feel somewhat bewildered – a sentiment so very understandable when an extreme shock strikes

COVID - 19 is an infectious disease caused by a new coronavirus first identified in December 2019. Coronaviruses are a family of viruses known to cause respiratory infections. There is no vaccine yet to prevent COVID - 19 , and no specific treatment for it, other than managing the symptoms.

With national case counts rising, federal public health officials have made it clear that if further public health and personal action isn't taken to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus, a return to lockdowns that paralyzed the country for much of the first half of 2020 may be the only option.

Those lockdowns saw federal spending soar to historic levels in an effort to offset the pandemic's crushing blow to Canadians' lives and livelihoods.

Billions of dollars were pushed out the door to help cover salaries, rents, the purchase of life-saving equipment and other targeted supports.

It all came just months after the Liberals had won a minority government and forced them to rip up much of the policy playbook they'd put before Canadians during the election.

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EU begins massive Covid - 19 vaccination drive amid new variant. Chinese journalist who covered "While dealing with a Covid - 19 pandemic, we are also on the brink of a hunger pandemic," David Ten countries were singled out as particularly at-risk, after housing the worst food crises last year; Yemen

COVID - 19 has governments at all levels operating in a context of radical uncertainty. The regional and local impact of the COVID - 19 crisis is highly heterogeneous, with significant implications for crisis management and policy responses. This paper takes an in-depth look at the territorial impact of the

That was the justification Prime Minister Justin Trudeau used in August when he requested that Parliament be prorogued to allow for a reset of priorities.

Just ahead of that decision, his government had announced a massive new aid package creating new benefits, including paid sick leave, and expanded employment insurance as part of the phase out of an emergency benefit put into place in the early days of the pandemic. The measures need legislation that will be put before Parliament in the coming days.

But the throne speech is expected to signal more tweaks are coming to EI, and make substantial commitments in other areas, including child are. For post-pandemic growth, the Liberals will detail plans that connect economic recovery to projects that equally combat climate change.

Trudeau will reinforce those plans in a nationally televised address scheduled for tonight, as he also urges Canadians to be resolute in their efforts to combat the pandemic.

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  Liberal effort to reset policy agenda panned by rivals as too much talk, not action OTTAWA — The minority Liberal government unveiled sweeping goals Wednesday to expand or extend supports for Canadians from nearly every sector of society in a throne speech billed as their “ambitious plan for an unprecedented reality.” But the plan hit political reality very quickly with two of the three main opposition parties in the House of Commons immediately saying they wouldn't support it. The Liberals' most likely dance partner, the NDP, waltzed around whether they'd vote yea or nay.

Covid has vindicated the validity of the national state. Only nation states have had the authority to impose lockdowns and then provide – or, in some countries, try to provide – emergency financial aid to compensate businesses and families for the impact of the lockdown.

COVID - 19 response. Draft resolution proposed by Albania, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain PP1 Deeply concerned by the morbidity and mortality caused by COVID - 19 pandemic PP3 Underlining the primary responsibility of governments to adopt and implement responses to the COVID - 19 pandemic

Though in the early days of the crisis he'd addressed Canadians daily from outside his home, a pivot to an evening televised speech is meant to underscore the threat of a new wave of illnesses.

The waning days of summer have seen a surge in cases no longer linked to vulnerable populations like those in long-term care homes as they were in the spring.

Instead, it is younger Canadians beginning to congregate in ever larger numbers, something that chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam warned Tuesday must come to a quick stop.

"The challenge we face now is to stay the course no matter how weary we may feel," Tam said.

Those cases have reached into the halls of power as well. After political staffers succumbed to infection, the leaders of both the Conservatives and Bloc Québécois, and their spouses, were infected and they are now in isolation.

Their parties will be given time to respond to Trudeau's televised address, but Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole and the BQ's Yves-François Blanchet will both be absent from Parliament Hill today for the throne speech.

Throne speech: Liberals vow to launch campaign to create one million new jobs, extend wage subsidy until 2021

  Throne speech: Liberals vow to launch campaign to create one million new jobs, extend wage subsidy until 2021 The Liberal government will launch a campaign to create one million jobs as part of its plan to dig the Canadian economy out of the ditch created by the COVID-19 pandemic. That plan includes extending the Canadian Emergency Wage subsidy program until the summer of 2021, spending money on infrastructure and handing out incentives to employers that hire and retrain workers. The million jobs promised by the government would return the country to pre-recession levels after the pandemic caused financial devastation even worse than the 2008 financial crisis.

Both are hoping to deliver their official replies on Sept. 29, when they're both out of quarantine.

That arrangement is one of few details known so far about how the House of Commons may actually function in the days ahead, with negotiations ongoing around issues such as how a hybrid Parliament — some MPs attending in person, and some remotely — can allow votes to be cast in a transparent and accountable way.

Given the Liberals only have a minority government, those votes could mean the difference between their survival and an election. The vote on the speech from the throne itself is a confidence motion.

With the ongoing escalation of cases, a snap election is unlikely, though whatever the Liberals do put forward is sure to be a large part of a campaign platform when that election arrives.

Each of the opposition parties has already laid down some markers ahead of the speech that will determine their support.

The NDP's Jagmeet Singh has already said he wants to see the promised legislation on EI changes, but is concerned too many people will still fall through the gaps, while Blanchet is looking for more money on health care for the provinces.

O'Toole — who has been Conservative leader for just a month — has signalled he wants to see concrete action to address the concerns of the West, and expanded support for businesses.

Throne speech: Liberals vow to launch campaign to create one million new jobs, extend wage subsidy until 2021

  Throne speech: Liberals vow to launch campaign to create one million new jobs, extend wage subsidy until 2021 Green Party Leader Elizabeth May was asked Wednesday if she thought the federal Liberals were "daring" the opposition to call an election by putting a throne speech forward and a vote on the CERB soon after. May responded by pointing to B.C. where an election has been called, something that May described as a self-interest "that is putting lives at risk."

Candice Bergen, the Conservative deputy leader, said today the party will be looking for measures to help Canadians who have been left behind, such as single mothers, fishers and oil workers.

Conservatives lack confidence in the government's ability to manage finances and bring spending under control, she told a news conference.

"We believe that support is needed, but there has to be fiscal restraint."

Conservatives do not necessarily believe it's in the best interest of Canadians to have an election right away, Bergen said.

"But if the speech from the throne is a bad speech from the throne, if it's bad for Canadians, if it's bad for those individuals that we are thinking about, we will not be supporting it."

The Green party's Elizabeth May wants a strong commitment to action on climate change to help avoid catastrophe.

"There's a point in our very near future where nothing humanity does will be able to make a difference. What we can do now makes the difference," she said today.

"We need to act on COVID-19 with resolve. We also need to act on the climate crisis with resolve."

The pandemic will also make itself felt in a marked downscaling of the pageantry that normally accompanies a throne speech.

Among other things, no special guests or spectators will be allowed into the Senate chamber, and the number of MPs attending is also being sharply curtailed.

—With files from Jim Bronskill

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 23, 2020.

Stephanie Levitz, The Canadian Press


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The NDP did not do well in the last federal election — but it did get lucky. The NDP lost 15 seats in last year's vote and was knocked down to fourth-party status in the House of Commons. With just 24 MPs remaining, the party was reduced to its lowest share of the House since Jack Layton's first election in 2004. But although it stumbled into the race in a perilously weakened position, Jagmeet Singh's NDP was not wiped out. Instead, the New Democrats fell backwards into a chance at relevance — because Justin Trudeau's Liberals also lost seats.

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