•   
  •   
  •   

Canada COMMENTARY: After vapid throne speech and address, it’s hard to see why prorogation was necessary

19:01  26 september  2020
19:01  26 september  2020 Source:   globalnews.ca

The West Block — Episode 55, Season 9

  The West Block — Episode 55, Season 9 Watch the full broadcast of The West Block from Sunday, Sept. 20, with Mercedes StephensonEpisode 55, Season 9

a large clock tower in the background: The Peace tower is seen on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Monday September 21, 2020. © Adrian Wyld/CP The Peace tower is seen on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Monday September 21, 2020.

It was never entirely clear why Prime Minister Justin Trudeau felt the need last month to prorogue Parliament.

Now that we’ve finally seen and heard the much-hyped throne speech — not to mention Trudeau’s own address to Canadians — it only serves to confirm the suspicion that this was all little more than political theatre.

That the prime minister’s ostensibly urgent national address on Wednesday night turned out to be a pointless waste of time is perhaps a fitting end to what has been a bizarre five weeks. For all the talk that the government needed a reset to lay out a serious new vision for how Canada can respond to and recover from the pandemic, it seems we’ve all been played by a rather unserious bunch.

Trudeau dangles national childcare system in throne speech with few hints of fiscal restraint

  Trudeau dangles national childcare system in throne speech with few hints of fiscal restraint Canada stands at a "crossroads" as the coronavirus pandemic surges, the throne speech said.But just how such an unprecedented national system could work is unclear and there were few concrete signs in the throne speech presented Wednesday of how the Liberals plan to rein in the massive federal deficit incurred with pandemic emergency spending.

There was nothing at all in Trudeau’s speech that warranted a national address, just as it turns out that there is really nothing outlined in the throne speech that warranted a prorogation of Parliament.

Read more: NDP will back Liberal throne speech, preventing fall election

It was a long throne speech, to be sure, and it did contain some new announcements as well as some hints of a broader, more ambitious agenda.

The announcement that the government intends on extending the Canadian Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) to next summer is indeed both new and significant.

Of course, it’s not the first time CEWS has been extended and therefore the government did not need a throne speech and a new session of Parliament to address this matter.

Shopify yet to inform federal privacy commissioner of breach involving 'rogue' staff

  Shopify yet to inform federal privacy commissioner of breach involving 'rogue' staff The office of Canada's privacy commissioner says Shopify Inc. has yet to notify it of a recent data breach the company says was carried out by two "rogue" employees. "We have not received a breach report about this incident," Vito Pilieci, a senior communications adviser for the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, told The Canadian Press in an email Wednesday. "Our office is reaching out to Shopify, given the potential seriousness of the breach, to request more information about the matter.

Meanwhile, the vague commitments to a national childcare plan or a national pharmacare plan seem remarkably similar to the Liberals’ previous vague commitments on childcare and pharmacare. The Liberals’ professed commitments to 2030 emissions targets and 2050 net-zero targets are awfully similar to what they promised during last year’s election.

If there is specific legislation the Liberals wish to table or matters upon which they wish or need to enlist the support of other parties, that option was always available to them.

As to addressing the pandemic itself, there wasn’t much new in the throne speech. The speech observed that “Canadians should not be waiting in line for hours to get a test,” but didn’t really articulate a plan for how we would prevent that from occurring. This isn’t a new problem, either, so perhaps we’d have been better off if the government started addressing this five weeks ago rather than waiting to include it in a throne speech.

People share photos of celebs they dated before they were famous

  People share photos of celebs they dated before they were famous We all have exes that we would rather forget, however, in this case old lovers are worth showing off.

The prime minister’s address didn’t exactly fill in any of these blanks. Trudeau spoke of the tough months ahead, how Canada is “on the brink” of a virus surge, and how we should all wear masks and wash our hands. But that’s hardly any different from what we hear on an almost daily basis at the federal coronavirus briefings.

Trudeau also offered a re-cap of the broader themes outlined in the Speech from the Throne, which seemed to serve no other purpose than ensuring that he’d be the face and the voice of these issues rather than Gov. Gen. Julie Payette.

In that context, it might be easier to understand the Liberals’ motivation in recent weeks: trying to distance themselves from various scandals. If Trudeau is prepared to demand time for a national address so as to distract from the controversies swirling around his choice for Governor General, maybe it’s not so far-fetched that they would prorogue Parliament so as to derail the committee investigations into the WE Charity scandal.

Read more: Throne speech appears poised to pass vote after COVID-19 benefits boost

Throne speech: Liberals vow to launch campaign to create one million new jobs, extend wage subsidy until 2021

  Throne speech: Liberals vow to launch campaign to create one million new jobs, extend wage subsidy until 2021 Deputy Leader of the Opposition and Conservative MP Candice Bergen said Wednesday the party is ready for a federal election if the NDP does not support the throne speech, which was delivered on Wednesday by Governor General Julie Payette. Bergen said that the prime minister should have presented a throne speech that addressed concerns of the Opposition, the provinces and “every day Canadians.”

At least we are able — for now, anyway — to rule out the theory that the Liberals were cynically trying to engineer the fall of their government thus precipitating a fall election. However, the deal the Liberals appear to have worked out with the NDP seems to represent a change in direction from recent weeks when the Liberals were refusing to consult with the other parties about the throne speech.

Again, if there is a genuine desire on the Liberals’ part to work with the other parties, that opportunity was there five weeks ago.

It’s hard to avoid the conclusion that the Liberals have been playing political games at a time when they have been offering all sorts of platitudes about the need for seriousness. After five wasted weeks, hopefully now they’ll start to live up to their own rhetoric.

Rob Breakenridge is the host of 'Afternoons with Rob Breakenridge' on Global News Radio 770 Calgary and a commentator for Global News.

Alberta premier says federal throne speech stomps into provincial jurisdiction .
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney sees grounds for more constitutional challenges, should the federal Liberal government follow through with promises contained in Wednesday's throne speech. Kenney told reporters Thursday morning that federal government plans jeopardize global investments in Alberta's forestry and fertilizer sectors — moves the premier believes are an infringement on Alberta's right to develop its own natural resources. He called the speech a "full-frontal attack" on federalism. "There were more policies that would invade provincial jurisdiction than I could count," Kenney said.

usr: 0
This is interesting!