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Canada Promise of hybrid sittings clears way for Senate to deal with worker aid bill

23:26  01 october  2020
23:26  01 october  2020 Source:   msn.com

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OTTAWA — The government's representative in the Senate is promising to introduce a motion Friday to hold hybrid sittings of the upper house during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  Promise of hybrid sittings clears way for Senate to deal with worker aid bill © Provided by The Canadian Press

Sen. Marc Gold's promise cleared the way Thursday for the Senate to deal swiftly later in the day with a bill authorizing new benefits for workers left jobless or underemployed by the health crisis.

Frustration over the Senate's failure to find a way to resume full operations in the midst of the pandemic prompted some senators Wednesday to block Gold's attempt to speed Bill C-4 through the chamber.

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The bill replaces the now-defunct Canada Emergency Response Benefit with a more expansive employment insurance regime and three new benefits for those who don't qualify for EI, fall sick or have to stay home to care for a dependant.

It was passed unanimously in the House of Commons in the early hours of Wednesday morning.

The Senate has sat only occasionally and briefly since mid-March to pass emergency aid legislation. Many senators want to adopt a format similar to that now being used in the Commons, with members able to participate in all proceedings, including votes, either in person or virtually.

"Many senators face impossible choices in terms of balancing health and safety, ensuring compliance with provincial regulations and discharging Senate duties and it is no longer viable to expect that all senators regularly criss-cross this country during the second wave of the pandemic when it becomes possible to do things differently," Gold told senators Thursday.

"Moving forward, I believe that the implementation of a hybrid approach will best serve Canadians."

Gold added that the Senate's administration has made "much progress" to make hybrid sittings "operational as soon as possible this fall."

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 1, 2020.

Joan Bryden, The Canadian Press

COMMENTARY: No election promise is too outlandish in the world of B.C. politics .
There's an astonishing game of political one-upmanship happening in the province, Mike Smyth says, and it has many British Columbians wondering what could be next. Could Wilkinson promise to pay off everyone's mortgage and credit-card bills? Could Horgan promise every kid a pony? In British Columbia, the political rules have changed. No promise, it appears, is too outlandish, no commitment too expensive. With the election just two weeks away, wait to see who wins the spending contest. Then watch to see if B.C.-style promise-mania catches on elsewhere in Canada.

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