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Canada Mandryk: Population once again becoming a Sask. election issue

17:20  03 october  2020
17:20  03 october  2020 Source:   leaderpost.com

Mandryk: Supreme Court challenge allows Sask. Party to tap into rural anger

  Mandryk: Supreme Court challenge allows Sask. Party to tap into rural anger Somewhere in Saskatchewan tonight, a farmer is coming off the field after hauling in the day’s last load of grain, pulses or oilseeds before evening dew puts an end to things. And somewhere you will hear that farmer mutter the words “tough” or “Trudeau” or a whole host of swear words not fit for this family publication. “Tough” is not only an apt way to describe making a living farming on the Prairies, but also the age-old term farmers here use to refer to excessive moisture content in the crops now coming off the field. If it’s too high, it greatly devalues the year’s work and makes storage impossible, requiring propane-run grain dryers.

That said, population is again an issue in play in this Saskatchewan election campaign. This always seems to be the case. Mandryk is the political columnist for the Leader-Post and Saskatoon StarPhoenix. Stay informed with a roundup of election news in our Campaigniacs newsletter each

Seemingly unbeknownst to the Sask . Or at least, one might have thought this Sask . Party administration would have gathered that from the days when former health minister Dustin Duncan used to send regional health authority CEOs to tour nursing homes in the province.

When it comes to growing this province, it does seem as if the Saskatchewan Party has had divine intervention … as opposed to Devine intervention, which has been a bit of a problem for the governing party.

a group of people posing for a photo in front of a crowd: The Saskatchewan Roughriders have had solid crowds this season, but have yet to sell out a game at Mosaic Stadium in 2019. © Provided by Leader Post The Saskatchewan Roughriders have had solid crowds this season, but have yet to sell out a game at Mosaic Stadium in 2019.

Among the myriad missteps and misfortunes of the Grant Devine Progressive Conservative government of the 1980s — the government in which Brad Wall, Ken Cheveldayoff, Kevin Doherty and so many other key Sask. Party players cut their teeth — was the shift in direction in Saskatchewan’s population.

Mandryk: Sense of urgency for Sask. Party might be behind urgent care centre plans

  Mandryk: Sense of urgency for Sask. Party might be behind urgent care centre plans There almost seemed a whiff of desperation accompanying the Saskatchewan Party government’s announcement Monday committing $30 million to urgent care centres in Regina and Saskatoon. That might seem illogical, given the current political climate that the Sask. Party dominates. But the only seats in the province really in play in this Oct. 26 election (to be called in the next two to three days) happen to be in Regina and Saskatoon. Taking more urban seats from the NDP or even holding the ones the Sask. Party now has could, potentially, seal the fate of the Saskatchewan NDP for good.

And he once again lauded his own government’s success in keeping the economy going. But it’s also telling Moe that the real COVID-19 fatigue may be fatigue with his government not doing enough. Mandryk is the political columnist for the Regina Leader-Post and Saskatoon StarPhoenix.

Both Fanrey and Mandryk don’t expect major spending announcements in the 2019/20 budget, speculating the Saskatchewan Party government will save that until their pre- election budget next year. Legislation expected to pass. Once the budget is delivered, it will shape much of the legislative

The province was growing wildly in the early 1980s that coincided with the early years of Devine, who campaigned in 1982 on the theme of “there’s so much more we can be” and gave stump speeches mentioning lonely Saskatchewan parents circling Easter on their calendars because that’s when the kids (presumably, driven out of the province by the NDP) would finally be coming home from Alberta for a visit.

Saskatchewan did top one million people in 1983, but the province’s population slid under that by the PCs’ second term. By the time the 1991 election rolled around, it was the NDP rolling out advertisements of the bus pulling up to the farm yard as the daughter says a tearful goodbye to mom and dad.

Unfortunately for the NDP, Saskatchewan’s population stagnated for the first 15 years of its 16-year tenure. Yes, it did begin to show signs of a turnaround as early as 2004 and the province did again top the one million mark in July 2007 before that year’s election. However, the NDP failed to capitalize on this reality in the election that year. Instead, the Sask. Party government has made population growth its hallmark — and for valid reason.

Mandryk: Moe kicking off campaign from a solid cabinet base

  Mandryk: Moe kicking off campaign from a solid cabinet base Starting Tuesday, Saskatchewan Party Leader Scott Moe will be presenting his case for a fourth government term centred around the notion that it’s his party with governance experience to successfully guide the province — with the lowest unemployment rate in the country and the sixth-lowest COVID-19 case numbers — through a pandemic. By contrast, New Democrat Leader Ryan Meili will heartily attempt to make a compelling case to voters — many of whom long ago abandoned the NDP — that the decisions emerging out of the Sask. Party government cabinet the past four years are precisely why this government does not deserve another four.

Americans and elected officials now have proof that the election was indeed stolen. There can only be zero tolerance for criminal interference in American elections . This international conspiracy must be met with swift action by the President and be fully supported by elected officials for the protection of

"But I think once you start to break down among the population of LGBTQ, what their experience are, and what it's like to navigate everyday life in Saskatchewan, that's where it changes, I suppose." Some in the community report facing micro-aggressions, whether its verbal attacks, misgendering or getting

Premier Scott Moe noted in his campaign-opening press conference Tuesday that Saskatchewan has added 170,000 people during his government’s tenure — growth unseen in this province in 90 years.

So imagine the NDP’s delight when the kickoff of this 2020 Saskatchewan election campaign was accompanied by the news that — for the first quarter in 14 years that goes back to before the last year it was in government — this province seen a decline in population.

Well, perhaps delight is the wrong word. No one — including anyone that aims to oversee the running of this province — wants to see Saskatchewan go back to the days of population loss.

Nevertheless, in a world where all is fair in love and war and political campaigns, it’s well within the rules for Ryan Meili and the NDP to point out the Statistics Canada second quarter population estimates that show a net a loss of 937 people, largely resulting from more people leaving Saskatchewan for other provinces than moving here. (Fortunately, Saskatchewan births are exceeding deaths, leaving our current population at the slightly lower 1,178,681 people.)

Mandryk: Feisty Meili campaign kickoff attempts to cut into Moe's head start

  Mandryk: Feisty Meili campaign kickoff attempts to cut into Moe's head start Saskatchewan Party Leader Scott Moe on Tuesday chose to stand in front of the “Moe-bile” — a massive Chevy Tahoe so christened by party officials that will serve as his 2020 election campaign bus. It was parked in front of Regina Pasqua candidate Muhammad Fiaz’s constituency office Tuesday morning, but it might as well have been already on the road, miles ahead. Consuming 15 to 18 miles per gallon of CO2 emitting gas, the Moe-bile seems a perfect metaphor for a governing party campaign that clearly intends it intends to roll over the NDP, using the past record of NDP governments — specifically economic growth — to shift into high gear.

Even though I totally disagree with the outcome of the election , and the facts bear me out “Many traitors will be arrested & jailed over the next several days,” wrote attorney Lin Wood in a Parler tweet he issued during the early morning hours, after Congress Never send donations to the GOP again .

We have another major bombshell for you here, regarding the 2020 election . Despite the intense, malicious censorship of Big Tech, we’re really becoming known for in-depth analysis and Why is this relevant to anything we’re seeing right now with the massive election fraud carried out by the

Obviously, you can blame the Sask. Party for neither people seeking greener pastures in this pandemic economy nor for the eventuality that Saskatchewan’s oil-driven boom was, inevitably, going to end sometime.

But in a province where population is as big a deal as public health care or privatization, the recent loss is going to be campaign fodder.

The Sask. Party might even welcome it in that it affords it an opportunity to take credit for what’s been happening for past 13 years. The NDP, however, will argue that it is yet another example of a party that’s grown out of touch with the emerging reality that Saskatchewan can no longer depend on oil and we need something more than the lowest minimum wage in the country.

However, the problem for the NDP is we just can’t be sure if a single-quarter dip is a trend or an anomaly.

Again, fortune seems to be smiling on the Sask. Party in that — even if this does turn into a longer-term trend — it’s more likely to be an issue in the next provincial election than this one.

That said, population is again an issue in play in this Saskatchewan election campaign. This always seems to be the case.

Mandryk is the political columnist for the Leader-Post and Saskatoon StarPhoenix.

Stay informed with a roundup of election news in our Campaigniacs newsletter each Saturday. To subcribe go to: https://leaderpost.com/Campaigniacsnewsletter

Scott Moe's history steals campaign trail spotlight from party promises .
The second week of Saskatchewan's election campaign has been filled with promises, but they have been overshadowed by the pasts of the candidates, most notably Saskatchewan Party Leader Scott Moe. Two political scientists familiar with Saskatchewan politics said Thursday that while Moe's history has taken the spotlight from party promises, it could be only a temporary diversion. "My sense is this will be a bit of a blip in the campaign and that it won't have a lasting effect," said University of Saskatchewan head of political studies Loleen Berdahl. Tom McIntosh, a professor of politics and international studies at the University of Regina, agreed.

usr: 1
This is interesting!