•   
  •   
  •   

Canada Indigenous minister says racism in health care can’t be fully addressed without provinces

07:05  17 october  2020
07:05  17 october  2020 Source:   globalnews.ca

Feds can use spending power to fight anti-Indigenous racism in health care: Miller

  Feds can use spending power to fight anti-Indigenous racism in health care: Miller OTTAWA — The federal government is ready to use its financial leverage over the health system to fight anti-Indigenous racism in health care, Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller says. He says that includes promoting Indigenous health workers and calling out racism wherever it's seen. "The federal power to spend with conditions, it's clear, it is a constitutional right. It exists within health," he said Thursday. "The question then is howHe says that includes promoting Indigenous health workers and calling out racism wherever it's seen.

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller says the death of Joyce Echaquan in a Quebec hospital after she was subjected to anti- Indigenous slurs shows vividly what Indigenous people can face in provincial health care systems. With COVID-19 cases rising again in Indigenous communities

Adrian Dix, Minister of Health , has issued the following statement regarding recent allegations of racism in the health - care system The allegation is that a game was being played to guess the blood-alcohol level of patients in emergency rooms, with Indigenous peoples and perhaps others.

Marc Miller wearing a suit and tie: Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller pauses as he responds to a question during a news conference Friday June 5, 2020 in Ottawa. © THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller pauses as he responds to a question during a news conference Friday June 5, 2020 in Ottawa.

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller said Friday that the federal government can only do so much to address systemic racism in the health-care system, and that it's up to the provinces to do much of that work.

“The reality is health is a jurisdiction that is jealously guarded by provinces,” Miller told reporters at a news conference.

Nurses union calls for independent inquiry into long-term care sector

  Nurses union calls for independent inquiry into long-term care sector The New Brunswick Nurses Union is calling on the Higgs government to order an independent inquiry into the long-term care sector, citing the "growing severity" of several issues, including low staffing ratios, residents sometimes going without care, such as toilet use and bathing, and an increase in violence. In a report released on Thursday, the union describes the system as being "in desperate need of reform." Nearly half of the province'sIn a report released on Thursday, the union describes the system as being "in desperate need of reform.

On June 19, provincial Health Minister Adrian Dix announced that B.C. would be investigating allegations Clara Morin Dal Col, president of Métis Nation B.C., said she was fully confident in Anyone with specific experience or knowledge of racism in the health care system is asked to share

A Department of Health spokeswoman said : "We want to make sure that everyone, regardless of ethnicity, age or background, gets the mental health treatment they need. She says she found it difficult to access mental health care from the NHS in the year before she was detained.

“We need their help to reform it. We cannot reform the licensing bodies. We do not have the power. The Supreme Court has said it clearly in black and white. We need their help."

Read more: Ottawa hosting meeting on healthcare racism amid outrage over Joyce Echaquan death

Miller's comments came after a virtual meeting Friday with other federal ministers and about 400 people, including Indigenous leaders and health-care professionals, to discuss experiences of racism and solutions. Miller said the group will reconvene with an action plan in January.

Earlier Friday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also said the provinces need to play a role, but said he was confident that local leaders will join federal efforts.

"Right across the country, all premiers have condemned racism,'' Trudeau said at a separate news conference in Ottawa.

Is Pandemic Unity Between Ottawa And The Provinces Starting To Slip? (Analysis)

  Is Pandemic Unity Between Ottawa And The Provinces Starting To Slip? (Analysis) OTTAWA — Has the blame game started? Canada’s pandemic response has, until now, mostly been defined by a collegiality between different levels of government. The sparring that existed a year ago, when Ontario Progressive Conservative Premier Doug Ford’s unpopularity found him guest-starring in the federal Liberals’ election attack ads, has been replaced with beaming smiles and kind words from one leader to another. Just last week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Ontario premier were full of praise for one another.

“I can say that Joyce's case is , unfortunately, not unique,” he said , adding, “we want to be treated differently.” The Indigenous community are Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called Echaquan’s treatment “the worst form of racism ” and another example of “systemic” racial discrimination.

The health secretary has said a technical glitch that saw nearly 16,000 Covid-19 cases go unreported in England "should never have happened". The error meant that although those who tested positive were told about their results, their close contacts were not traced. By Monday afternoon, around half

"There's still more work to do, obviously, but we are confident that we're going to be able to make significant improvements in the health care accessed by Indigenous Peoples,'' he said.

The issue of anti-Indigenous racism in health care gained new attention from outrage over the treatment of Joyce Echaquan, who used her phone to livestream hospital staff using racist slurs against her as she lay dying in a Joliette, Que., hospital last month.

Other provinces have seen their own issues. On Friday, a Manitoba First Nations elder came forward saying she was questioned about her alcohol use during a stay at a Winnipeg hospital for a bacterial skin infection, even though she doesn't drink.

Read more: First Nations elder alleges she was questioned about alcohol use at Winnipeg hospital

In British Columbia, an independent investigator is looking into allegations that emergency room staff were placing bets on Indigenous patients' blood alcohol levels. The investigation has since found racist "incidents" in every health region in the province.

The stars millennials have never heard of

  The stars millennials have never heard of Many young people have no clue about the celebrities of yesteryear. These superstars enchanted the public and their memories deserve to live on forever…

The prime minister said his health started to decline as his ulcerative colitis made a resurgence around the middle of July. Rather than addressing prepared questions, the prime minister mostly took questions. He seemed drained and was at times emotional as he faced the reporters.

A bigger problem could be the impact on Sweden's wider international reputation for high-quality state health and elderly care , she believes. But debates sharpened as the death toll increased, especially in care homes, and Prime Minister Stefan Lofven recently announced a coronavirus commission to

B.C.'s health minister said when the investigation was launched this past summer that the province is committed to putting in place the recommendations brought forward.

“This report will be acted on. That is essential, that is important, and that is why we’re asking, in particular, Indigenous people across British Columbia, but also health professionals to engage with this so we can make our health care system better and safer for everybody,” said Adrian Dix, who is currently seeking re-election in the Oct. 24 provincial election.

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, president of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs, said the comments from Miller and Trudeau were disappointing to hear.

"We've been dealing with the same political football game for the last 40, 50 years, and both levels of government keep attempting to pass the buck back and forth," he told Global News.

"What we need here is a very real, genuine commitment to legislative reform on both the federal and provincial levels ... that compels the feds and the province to meet certain funding levels and levels of service. And through that legislation they could be held accountable."

The RCMP have 'let down' Indigenous fishers facing violence in Nova Scotia: minister

  The RCMP have 'let down' Indigenous fishers facing violence in Nova Scotia: minister OTTAWA — The RCMP in Nova Scotia have failed to properly protect Indigenous people embroiled in an ugly dispute over lobster fishing, Canada's Indigenous services minister said Monday. Marc Miller was one of four federal cabinet ministers who took part in a news conference that followed a turbulent weekend in the southwestern corner of the province, where a lobster pound was burned to the ground and police accused one person of assaulting a Mi'kmaq leader and another of setting fire to a van owned by an Indigenous fisherman.

The minister for social affairs, Lena Hallengren, said : “It is a risk when we lift the ban. Johan Carlson, the director general of Sweden’s public health agency, also said last week the strategy had been a success because it meant messages to the public had been clear and consistent, placing the

Indigenous culture makes this country wonderfully unique - let's respect it.

Read more: Indigenous leaders, minister to discuss racism in health care as coronavirus cases rise

Rebecca Kudloo, the president of Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada, told the Canadian Press that Friday's meeting was a good start.

``The barriers to good health care is a problem,'' Kudloo said in an interview. ``The lack of cultural training for health service providers is a problem. We're sometimes treated like we don't have feelings.''

Kudloo lives in Baker Lake, Nunavut, where there is only one health centre staffed with nurse practitioners most of the time. People in her community often need to travel to Winnipeg or Iqaluit to get medical services.

She said that the government is offering Indigenous people encouraging words but little concrete action.

Miller said provinces are eager to address systemic racism in the health-care system and ``it would be careless to suggest'' Ottawa would hold back federal health transfers from the provinces and territories during the COVID-19 pandemic.

``But what we need to do is ensure that when federal money is invested according to its constitutional power, it is done in a fashion that reflects our values and our moral and legal duty to serve Indigenous Peoples and to ensure that they have first-class health care in the best country in the world.''

The RCMP have 'let down' Indigenous fishers facing violence in Nova Scotia: minister

  The RCMP have 'let down' Indigenous fishers facing violence in Nova Scotia: minister OTTAWA — The RCMP in Nova Scotia have failed to properly protect Indigenous people embroiled in an ugly dispute over lobster fishing, Canada's Indigenous services minister said Monday. Marc Miller was one of four federal cabinet ministers who took part in a news conference that followed a turbulent weekend in the southwestern corner of the province, where a lobster pound was burned to the ground and police accused one person of assaulting a Mi'kmaq leader and another of setting fire to a van owned by an Indigenous fisherman.

Read more: Treatment of Indigenous woman in Quebec hospital puts focus on systemic racism

Health Minister Patty Hajdu told reporters the federal government was "open to looking at all tools" to help combat systemic racism, not ruling out updating the language in the Canada Health Act to establish a standard of care for Indigenous patients.

``The system is not broken. It's created this way,'' she said. ``The systems and the people in them are incentivized to stay the same.''

She also suggested the federal government can use its financial leverage as positive reinforcement too.

``When we think about health transfers, often they're thought of in a punitive fashion, but I think we also have to have the promotion of systemic change as well as the punishment of bad behaviour,'' she said.

Miller said he ultimately holds the provinces "in good faith" to join Ottawa in whatever reforms are deemed necessary through continued meetings with Indigenous and health-care leaders.

"We know that they will do it because it’s about our identity as Canadians, but also about Indigenous peoples with respect that we still have a lot to learn and a lot of gaps to close," he said. "But we started by starting.

"There are measures perhaps that need to be taken in more immediate fashion, but again, I think this is something that all Canadians are waiting for answers for and we’re eager to provide.”

— With files from the Canadian Press

In uOttawa controversy, Quebec government seizes opportunity to push back against anti-racism advocates .
The Quebec government now has an official position about how a university in Ontario should manage its teaching staff, a remarkable development for a number of reasons. One, Quebec is yet again struggling to contain the spread of COVID-19, which has killed more people here than anywhere else in Canada. And yet no fewer than three members of the government, including the premier and two cabinet ministers, took time this week to make public comments chastising the University of Ottawa for temporarily suspending a professor who said the N-word in class.

usr: 4
This is interesting!