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Canada N.S. calls on Ottawa to define a 'moderate livelihood,' as fishing dispute boils over

18:30  18 october  2020
18:30  18 october  2020 Source:   msn.com

‘Terrorizing our people’: N.S. Mi’kmaw fishers have property vandalized, lobsters destroyed

  ‘Terrorizing our people’: N.S. Mi’kmaw fishers have property vandalized, lobsters destroyed On Tuesday night a facility was 'swarmed and vandalized' by commercial fishermen, said Chief Michael Sack of the Sipeknet'katik First Nation.The incidents, the latest in continuing tensions between Indigenous and non-Indigenous fishers in Nova Scotia, allegedly occurred at two locations, one in Central West Pubnico, N.S., and the other in New Edinburgh, N.S.

The dispute boiled over this past weekend after about 350 lobster traps were removed by WATCH | Fisheries minister says no one disputes right to fish for moderate livelihood , but 'it has to be within the Canadian framework': Fisheries minister calls for safety as Mi'kmaw lobster fishery begins.

The Senkaku Islands dispute , or Diaoyu Islands dispute , concerns a territorial dispute over a group of uninhabited islands known as the Senkaku Islands in Japan

HALIFAX — Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil is urging Ottawa to define what constitutes legal harvesting in a "moderate livelihood" fishery, after a dispute about Indigenous fishing treaty rights boiled over this weekend.

McNeil issued a statement on Twitter saying the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans needs to answer the question of what a moderate livelihood looks like before the province can examine its own rules for fish buyers.

He says Nova Scotia’s regulations rely on the federal department's authority and responsibility to manage the fishery and identify what constitutes legal, licenced fisheries.

Fire destroys lobster facility in southwest Nova Scotia amid escalating fishery tensions

  Fire destroys lobster facility in southwest Nova Scotia amid escalating fishery tensions A fire that police are calling suspicious destroyed a lobster pound in Middle West Pubnico, N.S., early Saturday. The blaze broke out at one of two facilities raided and vandalized by commercial fishermen in southwest Nova Scotia earlier this week protesting the "moderate livelihood" fishery launched by Sipekne'katik First Nation last month. Mi'kmaw fishers were storing their catches at the facilities. In a news release Saturday morning, the RCMP said they responded to the blaze at about midnight Saturday. Police say the fire is suspicious, and a man is in hospital with life-threatening injuries believed to be related to the fire.

Ottawa , city, capital of Canada, is located in southeastern Ontario. In the eastern extreme of the province, Ottawa is situated on the south bank of the The earliest inhabitants of the Ottawa region were members of the Algonquin First Nation (Native Americans), who established settlements in the

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McNeil says the province is working with Ottawa to find a facilitator to "bring the sides together," adding that the way to resolve the issue is through respectful dialogue.

His comments come after multiple acts of violence against the Indigenous fisheries in southwestern Nova Scotia.

A lobster pound in Middle West Pubnico, N.S., was burned to the ground early Saturday, destroying the lobster catch of Mi’kmaq fishers.

Earlier in the week, two clashes involving hundreds of people took place outside lobster pounds that store Indigenous-caught lobster.

The Mounties have made two arrests in relation to the incidents, with one man charged with assault against a local Indigenous chief and another man charged with arson.

In response to the escalating violence, Public Safety Minister Bill Blair has approved a request by Nova Scotia's Attorney General to step up the RCMP presence in the region in an effort to keep the peace.

N.S. calls on Ottawa to define a 'moderate livelihood,' as fishing dispute boils over

  N.S. calls on Ottawa to define a 'moderate livelihood,' as fishing dispute boils over HALIFAX — Calls for Ottawa to define a "moderate livelihood" fishery mounted on Sunday, as hundreds gathered in support of Indigenous lobster fishers after a heated dispute over treaty rights boiled over. Following fierce clashes outside fish plants in southwestern Nova Scotia last week, a lobster pound that stored the catch of Mi’kmaq fishers was burned to the ground early Saturday. The attacks prompted widespread condemnation, with the NDP'sFollowing fierce clashes outside fish plants in southwestern Nova Scotia last week, a lobster pound that stored the catch of Mi’kmaq fishers was burned to the ground early Saturday.

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Chief Mike Sack of the Sipekne'katik First Nation said he is grateful for the additional policing and law enforcement resources.

But he said some of the "damage, destruction, racist behaviour, harassment and intimidation" could have been avoided had repeated requests for a greater police presence been addressed more promptly.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he is "appalled by the acts of violence, intimidation, and destruction taking place in Nova Scotia."

"The perpetrators will be held accountable," he said Saturday on Twitter, noting that Ottawa has approved the request to provide more policing support. "We’re focused on keeping people safe."

The Supreme Court of Canada issued a landmark ruling in 1999 that said the Mi'qmaq and Maliseet people of Atlantic Canada and Quebec have a right to earn a "moderate livelihood" from fishing.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 18, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Mi'kmaq fisherman intends to fight federal charges alleging illegal lobster catch .
HALIFAX — A fisherman from a Mi'kmaq community in Cape Breton says he intends to plead not guilty to charges of illegal fishing after his lobster traps were seized last year by federal fisheries officers in southwestern Nova Scotia. Ashton Bernard, 30, of Eskasoni First Nation, said in a telephone interview Monday he will rely on the 1999 Supreme Court of Canada decision in the Donald Marshall Jr. case. The Supreme Court ruled that East Coast Indigenous communities have the right to fish for a moderate livelihood, citing peace treaties signed by the Crown in the 1760s.

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