•   
  •   
  •   

Canada Midway through fall, educators feel overwhelmed, stressed with 'no time to breathe,' 'no time to prep'

11:01  28 october  2020
11:01  28 october  2020 Source:   cbc.ca

Mike White Sets New HBO Series 'The White Lotus' Starring Connie Britton, Jennifer Coolidge

  Mike White Sets New HBO Series 'The White Lotus' Starring Connie Britton, Jennifer Coolidge HBO has lined up a new limited series from "Enlightened" creator Mike White, the premium cable network announced Monday. "The White Lotus," described as a "social satire," is a six-episode series set at an exclusive tropical resort. It will follow "the exploits of various guests and employees over the span of a week," according to the network. It is set to begin production in Hawaii later this month. Cast on the show includes "Looking" alum"The White Lotus," described as a "social satire," is a six-episode series set at an exclusive tropical resort. It will follow "the exploits of various guests and employees over the span of a week," according to the network.

Time management is key to avoiding homework stress . Plotting out the time you need to complete your homework or assignment can quickly make what 9. Remember to breathe . If you’re starting to feel anxious or overwhelmed by your work, take five deep breaths and give yourself a moment of calm.

I was thinking out loud half the time , just working through all the things on my mind. Sometimes we all get overwhelmed . The trick is to find a way to reset quickly, so you can recover and get back He so worried and stressed that he only had time to write one haiku per day, but it helped him keep his

a group of people standing in a room: Halfway through fall, teachers are feeling the strain amid a mountain of pandemic-induced changes to the classroom. 'There's no time to breathe this year. There's no time to prep.… You really are go, go go,' says one Ottawa teacher. © Evan Mitsui/CBC Halfway through fall, teachers are feeling the strain amid a mountain of pandemic-induced changes to the classroom. 'There's no time to breathe this year. There's no time to prep.… You really are go, go go,' says one Ottawa teacher.

Teachers Under Strain: CBC News journalists in Atlantic Canada and eastern Ontario teamed up to send out questionnaires to thousands of teachers to ask how they're feeling two months into an extraordinary school year. More than 2,000 teachers replied.

Classrooms look like they never have before this fall and teachers are feeling the weight of returning to school amid the pandemic, regardless of whether they're in a region deemed a COVID-19 hot spot or an area with little or no community transmission.

Jimmy Kimmel Gets A COVID Inspection From Borat

  Jimmy Kimmel Gets A COVID Inspection From Borat Borat is here to make sure everyone is COVID-free. On Monday’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”, the Kazakh broadcaster played by Sacha Baron Cohen appeared to give the host a COVID inspection. RELATED: Sacha Baron Cohen Details The ‘Hardest Thing’ About Filming ‘Borat 2’ “As a member of Hollywood elite have you drunk any unpasteurized children’s blood,” Borat asks Kimmel. Gallery: Behind The Scenes Of The 2020 Emmys (ET Canada) 1/13 SLIDES © @nbcthegoodplace/Instagram Real Friends "Congratulations to Schirt's Creek" fellow nominee "The Good Place" joked when "Schitt's Creek" swept the comedy category.

last Thursday for the first time after thousands of years of. causing earth tremors. can you hear and see? How do you feel ? In three minutes, write a few sentences on the topic.

Warning: Unimplemented annotation type "FreeText", falling back to base annotation. 9 If you feel stressed , breathing slowly should calm you down. 48 People will always want entertainment, providing that they have the time to enjoy it.

"The workload is never-ending. There's no time to breathe this year. There's no time to prep. There's no time to eat your lunch. You really are go, go go," says Lisa Levitan, a primary teacher in the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board, located in an Ontario region that's been rolled back to stricter measures due to a steep rise in coronavirus cases.

She's also hearing these sentiments from many colleagues.

"Teachers have been coming to me letting me know how upset they are, how stressed out they are. They're not eating. They're not sleeping. They're very overwhelmed. And quite frankly, some have already taken a year without pay or taken a year of sick leave or just decided this is not the job for them altogether," said the 16-year teaching veteran, who is a union steward at her school.

Armie Hammer Says ‘Call Me By Your Name’ Will Need ‘Room To Breathe’ Before A Sequel Can Be Discussed

  Armie Hammer Says ‘Call Me By Your Name’ Will Need ‘Room To Breathe’ Before A Sequel Can Be Discussed Fans have been anxiously waiting for a “Call Me By Your Name” sequel, but if Armie Hammer has anything to say, it will be a lot longer. The 2017 film starred Hammer, 34, and Timothée Chalamet, 24, as lovers and shot Chalamet into stardom. While speaking to Collider, Hammer said the movie “needs room toThe 2017 film starred Hammer, 34, and Timothée Chalamet, 24, as lovers and shot Chalamet into stardom.

Feeling tired and drained most of the time . Lowered immunity, frequent illnesses. Now is the time to pause and change direction by learning how you can help yourself overcome burnout and feel healthy and positive again. If you’re having trouble following through with these self-help tips to prevent or

Stress can feel overwhelming and when you’re dealing with it, it can be hard to see a light at the end of the tunnel. Well, consider this your reminder! Here are some helpful quotes to read the next time you’re feeling stressed —as to remind yourself that no matter how stressful today is, there’s always

Once a student in the board that she now teaches in, Levitan said "amazing" educators from her childhood inspired her to pursue the profession.

"I love my job. I can't wait to come to work every Monday morning," she said. "But this is the first time I've ever even considered taking a leave of absence or taking the year off.… I love what I do, but I don't know if I'm going to make it the year."

WATCH | Ottawa educator on the toll of teaching amid COVID-19:

As part of an ongoing project, CBC News sent a questionnaire to the public email addresses of approximately 22,000 school staffers in eastern Ontario, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick. We asked specifically that teachers respond, and more than 2,000 did.

They shared responses to topics ranging from what physical distancing looks like in their classrooms to remaining in the profession.

USA TODAY Sports midseason college football awards

  USA TODAY Sports midseason college football awards It's a unique college football season that has us at the midway point and some teams haven't start. But we will still hand out our midseason awards.While the Big Ten just got started and the Pac-12 won't open until Nov. 7, the 2020 season began Sept. 5 and has heated up since the SEC opened on Sept. 26.

Feeling stressed out? Melt that stress away right now in the next 10 minutes! Banish stress quickly and easily with this video. In less than 10 minutes you

( Time stands still) Time stands still ( Time stands still) Your eyes are swallowing me Mirrors start to whisper Shadows start to sing My skin's smothering me Help me find a way to breathe Time stood still The way it did before It's like I'm sleepwalking Fell .

Just over 70 per cent of the respondents — who spanned kindergarten to high school teachers — said physical distancing between students in class happened not very often or not at all. Meanwhile, nearly three-quarters of the participants said that inside classrooms, they are not very often or not at all able to remain physically distanced from students.

A third of the respondents said they're considering changing professions or retiring.

Though COVID-19 case counts are drastically different across provinces, respondents across regions shared similar feelings of being overwhelmed, stressed or exhausted.

These concerns are echoed by educators in Quebec, which has had the most COVID-19 cases and deaths in Canada. CBC News sent a similar but separate questionnaire to the public email addresses of approximately 10,000 public school workers in that province: queries based on responses to an earlier questionnaire about Quebec teachers' concerns before school started.

More than 1,500 French- and English-language teachers responded to the latest one, with just over half saying they are rarely or never able to stay physically distanced from students. About 34 per cent of the Quebec respondents have considered changing professions, while 23 per cent are thinking of retirement.

Covid: Macron defends himself by switching to a European scale

 Covid: Macron defends himself by switching to a European scale © STEPHANIE LECOCQ Emmanuel Macron and Angela Merkel, July 21 in Brussels. Accused of not having anticipated the rebound, the Head of State stressed on Wednesday evening that all EU countries were overwhelmed by an explosion whose violence nobody had imagined. Emmanuel Macron did not win his bet: allow the French to "live with the virus" while avoiding re-containment.

The difficult time you’re going through will start to seem less significant when it’s compared to everything that’s going right in your life. Focus on your breath, taking a few deep breaths. Let your belly expand when you breathe in for diaphragmatic breathing .

- It often takes a long time to get over flu. 1. recuperarse; 2. olvidarse de; 3. vencer, superar. collapse (n) =to fall down (and usually become unconscious), especially because you are very ill I sick. have taken. PPS. because is a finished actions with no time given. I think I need a blood test.

"We are all feeling drained. We're all feeling exhausted and wondering how we're going to get through this school year," said Shelly Bembridge, a Grade 6 teacher in the Halifax Regional School Board.

"I love being an educator, but I don't feel like that's what I'm doing right now. I feel like I'm a technician. I'm troubleshooting technology problems. I feel like I'm a COVID rule-enforcer."

Bembridge said she's working harder than she ever has in her entire 18-year career.

"I want to focus on student learning and supporting students in academic pursuits, and I don't feel like I have the skill set to do all of the other things on top of what I'm doing."

a person sitting at a table using a laptop: Shelly Bembridge spends hours of personal time working on video one-on-ones for her students since she can't get close in class these days. Sometimes when the Nova Scotia teacher is online working at night, students will send chat messages asking for help. © Robert Short/CBC Shelly Bembridge spends hours of personal time working on video one-on-ones for her students since she can't get close in class these days. Sometimes when the Nova Scotia teacher is online working at night, students will send chat messages asking for help.

Teaching has changed

So much of the onus has been for schools to develop and maintain health protocols such as sanitization, she said. Bembridge believes teachers should have instead been given the time to focus on how to keep students engaged given the varying models school might take amid the pandemic.

She's grappling with, for instance, how to adapt the learning stations she's built since she can't have students move around in the classroom. "It takes time to develop those alternative means of delivering the curriculum in an engaging way," she said.

"People are really stupid!" : the big rant of Nathalie Marquay Pernaut!

 France is going back into confinement this October 29, and Nathalie Marquay is already overwhelmed ... On the Web, Jean-Pierre Pernaut's wife gave a rant! © Instagram Nathalie Marquay France is going back into confinement on October 29, and Nathalie Marquay is already overwhelmed ...

"The only way I'm able to kind of give those engaging opportunities to my students is coming home every day and dedicating hours of my own personal time. But that comes at a cost to my family. It comes at a cost to my sleep, my mental health."

Students may be back in school, but many people aren't fully aware of the fundamental differences in how classes must operate now, according to Paul Wozney, president of the Nova Scotia Teachers Union.

"Teachers can't group students together freely. The kinds of physical activity that you can do with students and the way that you can use spaces in the building is different.… [Additional] cleaning and sanitation, all that has an impact," he said.

"People assume that teaching is the same. It's not. Teaching has changed. How you do your job with physical distancing, with public health protocols — it's not the same work, and that's been a huge adjustment."

Educators at 'state of high alert'

If teachers feel stress, it can trickle down to the students, says developmental psychologist Lisa Bayrami, a contract lecturer at Lakehead University.

"We need to prioritize the well-being of educators because if they're feeling as though they're in survival mode… they don't have the capacity to co-regulate and to engage in those attuned, positive relationships with students," she said.

"We really need to support educators so that they are able to move out of this state of high alert into one which allows them to support the well-being of their students."

a man and a woman standing in front of a mirror: If teachers feel stress, it can have an effect on students, according to developmental psychologist Lisa Bayrami. 'We really need to support educators so that they are able to move out of this state of high alert into one which allows them to support the well-being of their students.'  © Evan Mitsui/CBC If teachers feel stress, it can have an effect on students, according to developmental psychologist Lisa Bayrami. 'We really need to support educators so that they are able to move out of this state of high alert into one which allows them to support the well-being of their students.'

Many teachers, Bembridge and Levitan included, have called on their provincial education ministers to pay a visit to schools to see how their respective back-to-school plans actually look inside classrooms.

Browns donate $350,000 to close digital divide in poverty-stricken East Cleveland schools

  Browns donate $350,000 to close digital divide in poverty-stricken East Cleveland schools Browns players, coaches and the organization pooled together to donate $350,000 to help close the digital divide in East Cleveland City Schools.Rather than kick off their day with their typical planning meeting for the final practice leading up to Sunday’s game, coach Kevin Stefanski and his players carried out a more pressing mission: continuing their fight for social justice in their community. More specifically, the Browns took steps toward eliminating the digital divide that has placed students in the East Cleveland City Schools district at a severe educational disadvantage.

"We know that many students, their families, and education staff may be experiencing increased stress, anxiety, feelings of isolation and may be worried about their health and well-being and the well-being of their families and friends," Caitlin Clark, spokesperson for Ontario Education Minister Steven Lecce, said in a statement.

She reiterated that the ministry provided health and safety training ahead of the 2020-21 school year, including a day dedicated to mental health and well-being, and pledged $3 million that could be used to support staff mental health and well-being.

'We're trying our best'

Educators' levels of exhaustion and heavy workloads had already been on the radar pre-COVID, said New Brunswick Education Minister Dominic Cardy, who acknowledged that the pandemic has forced teachers to step up more than they ever have.

"If they're not getting recharged, they're not going to be able to teach properly. It's not just a question of looking out for the teachers and their well-being. It's a question of the quality of the education system: if you're hungry and haven't had any sleep and haven't had a chance to rest or breathe, then you're not likely going to be able to give your best professionally," Cardy said.

"We are trying our best to make sure that within the framework of properly protecting our school system from COVID-19, that we are very cognizant of the weight and the load this is imposing on teachers. We're going to do our very best as we go through this to deal with that and, when it's done, to make sure that there are efforts made to deal with what will be long-term consequences."

Navigating a return to school during the pandemic has been "uncharted territory," said P.E.I. Education Minister Brad Trivers, who noted that "the amount of energy that teachers expend is definitely higher than normal" right now.

"It's natural for everybody to be feeling some anxiety and stress as we go into uncharted territory. But the key thing is we're learning all the time, and we're willing to adjust and make changes as needed."

To share your experience in the education system during COVID-19 and for any story tips, please email us: education-talk@cbc.ca

With files from the CBC Investigative Unit, Jennifer Chevalier, Shaina Luck, Jonathan Montpetit, Karissa Donkin, Brittany Spencer and Deana Sumanac-Johnson

USA TODAY Sports Super 25 high school football rankings for Nov. 3, 2020 .
This is the Super 25, USA TODAY Sports' national high school football team rankings for Nov. 3, 2020.You can look back on the Super 25 preseason rankings and also check out the preseason USA TODAY Sports All-USA team, where we introduce you to the best high school football players in the nation as (some of) them get ready to take the field this season.

usr: 7
This is interesting!