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Canada Kheiriddin: A ‘great reset’ conservatives can get behind

16:50  28 november  2020
16:50  28 november  2020 Source:   windsorstar.com

Conrad Black: Trudeau's 'reset' aims to revisit the failed policies of yesteryear

  Conrad Black: Trudeau's 'reset' aims to revisit the failed policies of yesteryear This week, I clicked on to a link sent by a correspondent and watched and listened to Justin Trudeau telling us how his government would take advantage of the COVID-19 pandemic to implement a positive “reset” of the country. I’ve written here before of my goodwill toward Trudeau as a person. He is friendly, intelligent, dashing, sincere and contemporary. But his government’s policy analysis is perversely stubborn and outdated. For more than 25 For more than 25 years, Canada’s federal government has been in a deepening creative policy drought. From 1963 to 1993, largely propelled by the Quebec crisis, the federal government was commendably innovative. Prime Minister Lester B.

Schwab says “ Great Reset ” should happen soon. “The ‘ Great Reset ’ is a proposal to completely alter the entire global economy, moving it more toward collectivism Conservative commentator Alex Newman, in an episode of Behind The Deep State, said that instead of “revamping” the economy, this

The Great Reset is a proposal by the World Economic Forum (WEF) to rebuild the economy sustainably following the COVID-19 pandemic.

Tasha Kheiriddin

After nine months of COVID restrictions, some Canadians are reaching peak crazy.

In Rosemère, a flash mob of anti-maskers held a dance protest in the local mall. In Kelowna, B.C., bare-faced demonstrators called for “Truth, Freedom, Choice” and to “lock up” provincial Chief Medical Officer Bonnie Henry. And then there’s Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre, flirting with the conspiracy crowd after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tossed the term “reset” into his latest word salad.

These cringeworthy spectacles distract from the important contribution conservatives could make to a post-pandemic society. For yes, a reset is coming. And no, it’s not the one QAnon or its ilk are worried about.

Rex Murphy: Conjuring up an even greater reset

  Rex Murphy: Conjuring up an even greater reset Some world leaders, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau apparently among them, think that the COVID-19 crisis offers an “opportunity” to “re-imagine” or “reshape” national economies, and tie them to broad international schemes. High in the list of such schemes is, in their words, “ending the carbon economy.” In other words, killing off oil and gas. In a weak moment, I have allowed myself to imagine how Trudeau could earn, if not the right, then at least the acceptance of the Canadian public, for his grand international visions. The speech that follows is entirely imaginary, which at least places it in the same realm as some of the schemes we have been hearing about.

Self-styled Great Reset ‘experts’ took the opportunity to share their conclusions with the curious… Klaus Schwab of the World Economic Forum (part In the text of his “ Great Reset ” book, Schwab calls for global leaders to seize the opportunity presented by the Covid-19 pandemic to remake society in

The club will get smaller but wealthier and will attempt to sway our collective destiny. Control over education, healthcare, means of communications and basic social provisions is being increasingly ceded by governments Perhaps this is what the World Economic Forum refers to as the Great Reset .

Governments around the world are broke. Global debt has soared by over US$15 trillion in the first three quarters of 2020, hitting a record US$272 trillion. Debt in developed markets topped 432 per cent of GDP in the third quarter. And Canada’s leading the pack, with an increase in our debt-to-GDP ratio of over 75 percentage points.

In these circumstances, big government becomes a big fantasy.

There will be no funds to sustain current levels of service, let alone basic income or national pharmacare. Even if the state soaks the rich, it would not fill the bottomless pit. An annual one-per-cent wealth tax on Canadians with fortunes over $20 million would generate $5.6 billion a year; but federal debt alone is projected to hit 1.2 trillion in 2020-21.

Chris Selley: A 'great reset' requires a determined leader. Thankfully, Trudeau isn't it

  Chris Selley: A 'great reset' requires a determined leader. Thankfully, Trudeau isn't it Erin O’Toole’s Conservatives are accusing Justin Trudeau of harbouring a very ambitious hidden agenda — not just for Canada but for the world. As part of a multinational effort, a petition launched by Conservative finance critic Pierre Poilievre alleges, the Liberals want to “re-engineer economies and societies to empower the elites at the expense of the people.” They want to remodel Canada to fit the prime minister’s personal “socialist ideology,” Poilievre recently told the finance committee.

Google has declared war on the independent media and has begun blocking emails from NaturalNews from getting to our readers. We recommend GoodGopher.com as a free, uncensored email receiving service, or ProtonMail.com as a free, encrypted email send and receive service.

Preview — Rescuing Canada's Right by Tasha Kheiriddin . This dominance has caused a great deal of frustration onall political fronts, especially on the right. In the past two years, thelong-awaited merger of the Canadian Alliance and the ProgressiveConservatives has not achieved the results many were

The time is ripe for a “great reset”: a reset to a smaller state. And while conservatives may not hold the levers of power in Ottawa (yet), they do in six provinces where they could make a big difference.

First, health care. Pre-pandemic, surgical wait times were dismally long. Now, they stretch to the horizon. In Moncton, N.B., the average wait time for a knee or hip replacement was 450 days; today, it’s 540. At Toronto’s Sick Kids Hospital, two-thirds of patients missed the target window for their operations: 5,000 children will be wait-listed in 2021 and the list is projected to grow.

If there was ever a moment to say “enough” to the demonization of private health care, it is now.

We need capacity, and it should not matter who provides it. There is no reason why Canada cannot have both a public system, funded by the state, and a private one, funded by insurance, as the entire European Union — actually, make that almost the entire world — already has. All that’s missing is the political will to make it happen.

Tasha Kheiriddin: Let's try a 'great reset' that conservatives can love

  Tasha Kheiriddin: Let's try a 'great reset' that conservatives can love After nine months of COVID restrictions, some Canadians are reaching peak crazy. In Rosemère, Que. , a flash mob of anti-maskers held a dance protest in the local mall. In Kelowna, B.C ., bare-faced demonstrators called for “Truth, Freedom, Choice” and to “lock up” provincial Chief Medical Officer Bonnie Henry. And then there’s Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre, flirting with the conspiracy crowd after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tossed the term “reset” into his latest word salad. © Provided by National Post The time is ripe for a “great reset”: a reset to a smaller state.

To improve the state of the world, the World Economic Forum is starting The Great Reset initiative. Drawing from the vision and vast expertise of the leaders engaged across the Forum’s communities, the Great Reset initiative has a set of dimensions to build a new social contract that honours the dignity of

Funding gives us more weapons! Thank you patriots! Oh and If you disable the Ad-blocker - on your deathbed you will receive total consciousness. So you got that going for you which is nice!

Second, education. When the pandemic ends, will all students head back to institutional, indoor, in-person instruction? For many, the answer is probably yes, but for others, it could be no. Some kids love online learning: it has freed them from bullies, harassment and other drama.

Others are thriving in alternative education, as schools experiment with outdoor and experiential learning. Some families have discovered they prefer to home school.

This calls for choice in education. Voucher systems, online options, home school support and specialized curricula would not only meet students’ needs, but cut brick, mortar and labour costs. Governments should embrace diversity rather than default to the old model.

Third, infrastructure. The pandemic has changed where we live and work. Urbanites are decamping to suburbs and small towns; workers are commuting to their home office instead of the downtown core.

Statistics Canada reports deep transit ridership declines across Canada; even when the Ontario economy reopened, the Toronto Transit Commission reported passenger volume down 50 per cent.

Instead of prioritizing urban transit, governments should focus on exurban broadband, as Ontario has already pledged to do. This would not only entrench a rural economic revival, but fewer commuters mean fewer polluters, whether in their cars or on the bus.

If Canada resets the right way, we can become a stronger, more resilient and responsive society. Rather than dancing à visage découvert, conservatives should step up and offer lasting change.

Postmedia News

Tasha Kheiriddin is a Postmedia columnist and principal with Navigator Ltd.

Tory MPs keep talking on assisted dying bill as clock ticks down to Dec. 18 deadline .
OTTAWA — Conservative MPs are refusing to be rushed into a vote on assisted dying legislation, despite a looming court-imposed deadline. The Liberal minority government has until Dec. 18 to pass Bill C-7, legislation intended to comply with a Quebec Superior Court ruling that struck down a provision allowing only individuals who are already near death to receive medical help to end their suffering. The government had hoped to wrap up debate on the bill in the House of Commons on Monday, paving the way for a final vote Tuesday and leaving just over two weeks for the Senate to deal with it before time runs out.

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This is interesting!