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Canada A year of coronavirus in Canada: A look back at what we've faced during the pandemic

11:40  25 january  2021
11:40  25 january  2021 Source:   cbc.ca

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a person standing in front of a brick building: A skateboarder passes a wall mural with the writing 'we are all in this together' at the George Street Diner in Toronto, on May 31, 2020. © Timothy Neesam/CBC A skateboarder passes a wall mural with the writing 'we are all in this together' at the George Street Diner in Toronto, on May 31, 2020.

It's been a roller-coaster ride for many of us during Canada's first year of the coronavirus pandemic from the first lockdown to the arrival of vaccines.

Here's a look back at what we've faced these past 12 months.

COVID-19 arrives in Canada

Canada reported its first "presumptive" case of COVID-19 on Jan. 25, 2020, a few weeks after Chinese health officials identified a new strain of coronavirus in Wuhan, China.

The patient was a man in his 50s who had just days earlier returned to Toronto from Wuhan, the epicentre of the outbreak at the time. He fell ill almost immediately on his return and was admitted to Sunnybrook Hospital where he stayed for about a week before being discharged.

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On the day Canada confirmed its first case, travellers were seen wearing masks as a precaution as they arrived at Pearson International Airport.

(Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press)

Earlier that week, passengers were also spotted wearing masks as they arrived at Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C.

(Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)

Stranded Canadian families, vacationers repatriated

Canadians in Wuhan were left in limbo as the city of more than 11 million people went into lockdown and return flights to Canada were cancelled. In early February, federal officials on the ground there co-ordinated the evacuation of hundreds of Canadians from the region, including Fredericton's Michael Schellenberg and his family.

A timeline of COVID-19 in Canada

  A timeline of COVID-19 in Canada Here's a timeline of key developments in the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada since the first presumptive case was reported on Jan. 25, 2020: Jan. 25: A Toronto man in his 50s who returned from the Chinese city of Wuhan — the initial epicentre of the outbreak — becomes the first presumptive case of the novel coronavirus in Canada. The man is placed in isolation in Toronto's Sunnybrook Hospital. Jan. 26: The man's wife, who had travelled with him from Wuhan, also tests positive, becoming the country's second presumptive case. The woman is allowed to self-isolate at home. Jan.

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We ' ve taken a look at some of the more unusual steps countries have taken to combat Covid-19. The government was forced to apologise after its women's ministry posted cartoons online telling wives to dress up, wear makeup and avoid nagging their husbands during the country's partial lockdown.

They and other evacuees had to quarantine for two weeks at CFB Trenton in Trenton, Ont., on their return.

(Submitted by Michael Schellenberg)

Canadians who had been aboard the coronavirus-hit Grand Princess cruise ship step off a plane at CFB Trenton on March 10, 2020, after being repatriated via Oakland, Calif.

(Lars Hagberg/The Canadian Press)

Lockdown, lineups and shortages

An empty street in Calgary is shown on April 2, 2020, after COVID-19 restrictions went into effect.

a train driving down the street: Empty streets in Calgary during the COVID 19 restrictions. Photos taken on April 2nd, 2020. © Monty Kruger/CBC Empty streets in Calgary during the COVID 19 restrictions. Photos taken on April 2nd, 2020.

(Monty Kruger/CBC)

Panic-buying and stockpiling led to bare shelves at many grocery stores, including this Superstore location in Richmond, B.C., on March 17, 2020.

a large room: Empty shelves are pictured at a Superstore grocery store in Richmond, B.C., on March 17, 2020. B.C. Finance Minister Carole James has urged shoppers not to stockpile groceries, saying the Retail Council of B.C. has reassured the government the supply chain to the province is still bringing enough goods for everyone. © Ben Nelms/CBC Empty shelves are pictured at a Superstore grocery store in Richmond, B.C., on March 17, 2020. B.C. Finance Minister Carole James has urged shoppers not to stockpile groceries, saying the Retail Council of B.C. has reassured the government the supply chain to the province is still bringing enough goods for everyone.

(Ben Nelms/CBC)

Coronavirus: 6.3M travellers entered Canada and didn’t quarantine

  Coronavirus: 6.3M travellers entered Canada and didn’t quarantine More than six million travellers have entered Canada since the start of the novel coronavirus pandemic without being forced to quarantine, new statistics show.This includes truck drivers and other people involved in the transportation of commercial goods, cross-border workers who travel to the United States regularly, and people who arrive in Canada by plane, either from the U.S. or other countries directly.

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Toilet paper was in short supply at stores across the country, including this Save on Foods location in Vancouver on April 16, 2020.

a display in a store: Partially empty toilet paper shelf in Save on Foods in Vancouver on Thursday, April 16, 2020. (Maggie MacPherson/CBC) © Maggie MacPherson/CBC Partially empty toilet paper shelf in Save on Foods in Vancouver on Thursday, April 16, 2020. (Maggie MacPherson/CBC)

(Maggie MacPherson/CBC)

Customers wait in a lineup outside to shop at a Costco Wholesale store in Burnaby, B.C., on April 21, 2020.

a group of people riding on the back of a boat: Customers wait in a line-up outside to get inside Costco Wholesale store in Burnaby, British Columbia on Tuesday, April 21, 2020. © Ben Nelms/CBC Customers wait in a line-up outside to get inside Costco Wholesale store in Burnaby, British Columbia on Tuesday, April 21, 2020.

(Ben Nelms/CBC)

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COVID-19 in long-term care homes, patients in ICUs

An elderly woman sits near a window at the Lynn Valley Care Centre in North Vancouver on March 14, 2020. According to B.C.'s top doctor Dr. Bonnie Henry, four residents and 12 staff members tested positive for COVID-19 at the seniors' facility where Canada's first death from the virus occurred on March 8.

a person standing in front of a window: A senior is pictured inside the Lynn Valley Care Centre in North Vancouver, B.C., on March 9, 2020. © Ben Nelms/CBC A senior is pictured inside the Lynn Valley Care Centre in North Vancouver, B.C., on March 9, 2020.

(Ben Nelms/CBC)

Coronavirus: 2 deaths, 44 cases in London-Middlesex; 1 death, 10 cases in Sarnia-Lambton

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Registered nurse Liana Perruzza attends to a patient in the COVID-19 intensive care unit at St. Paul's hospital in downtown Vancouver on April 21, 2020.

Coronavirus: 30 new COVID-19 cases in Middlesex-London; 1 death and 12 cases in Elgin Oxford

  Coronavirus: 30 new COVID-19 cases in Middlesex-London; 1 death and 12 cases in Elgin Oxford The region's COVID-19 pandemic case tally now stands at 5,642, of which 3,787 people have recovered, an increase of four from the day before. Health unit figures show that at least 2,260 cases have been reported in the region since the beginning of the month. Roughly 1,686 cases are active in the region, according to the figures. At least 175 people have died during the pandemic. The two latest deaths reported Friday involved two women in their 70s and 90s who were both associated with a long-term care home.

(Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)

A patient suspected of having COVID-19 receives treatment in the ICU at North York General Hospital in Toronto on May 26, 2020.

a person sitting on a bed: A patient suspected of having COVID-19 recieves treatment in the intensive care unit at North York General Hospital, in Toronto, on May 26, 2020. © Evan Mitsui/CBC A patient suspected of having COVID-19 recieves treatment in the intensive care unit at North York General Hospital, in Toronto, on May 26, 2020.

(Evan Mitsui/CBC)

LTCs and soldiers

Following a request for help by the Quebec government, members of the Canadian Armed Forces were dispatched in April to help residents in long-term care homes (LTCs) dealing with coronavirus outbreaks.

In Laval, Que., funeral home workers remove a body from the Centre d'hebergement Sainte-Dorothee on April 13, 2020, which at the time was the city's hardest-hit LTC, with over 100 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

(Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press)

In Ontario, 250 soldiers were sent to five seniors' homes.

A staff member escorts soldiers into a long-term care home, in Pickering, Ont., on April 25, 2020.

(Chris Young/The Canadian Press)

Easter, summer patios and haircuts

Rev. Nick Meisl of St. Patrick's Roman Catholic parish takes confession from parishioners at a walk-in confessional in Vancouver on April 8, 2020.

a man and a woman standing in a room: Rev. Nick Meisl of St. Patrick's Roman Catholic parish takes confession from parishioners at a walk-in confessional in Vancouver, British Columbia on Wednesday, April 8, 2020. © Ben Nelms/CBC Rev. Nick Meisl of St. Patrick's Roman Catholic parish takes confession from parishioners at a walk-in confessional in Vancouver, British Columbia on Wednesday, April 8, 2020.

(Ben Nelms/CBC)

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Physical distancing measures were in place at the first screening of the Twilite Drive-In Theatre's 2020 season on May 15, 2020, in Wolseley, Sask.

a car parked in a parking lot: Sights and scenes from the first screening of the Twilite Drive-In’s 2020 season on May 15, 2020. © Bryan Eneas/CBC Sights and scenes from the first screening of the Twilite Drive-In’s 2020 season on May 15, 2020.

(Bryan Eneas/CBC)

Thousands of people packed the popular Trinity Bellwoods Park in Toronto on May 23, 2020, one of the first warm days of the year, violating the city's physical distancing bylaw and relieving themselves in neighbours' laneways and backyards. To encourage physical distancing, the city painted circles on the grass.

a group of people sitting in the grass: Composite illustration featuring Trinity Bellwoods Park crowd, left, and Trinity Bellwoods Park physical distancing circles © Michael Charles Cole/CBC, Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press Composite illustration featuring Trinity Bellwoods Park crowd, left, and Trinity Bellwoods Park physical distancing circles

(Michael Charles Cole/CBC, Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press)

In St. John's, the Memorial Day parade to honour the fallen was cancelled in order to adhere to physical distancing rules. But a few passersby paid their respects anyway.

a group of people walking down the street: The public was asked not to attend Wednesday's ceremony, but a few passersby paid their respects. (Peter Cowan/CBC) See ha view of socially distanced people at bottom of memorial. © Peter Cowan/CBC The public was asked not to attend Wednesday's ceremony, but a few passersby paid their respects. (Peter Cowan/CBC) See ha view of socially distanced people at bottom of memorial.

(Peter Cowan/CBC)

Torontonians take advantage of Stage 2 of Ontario's reopening by grabbing a seat at a patio at Lansdowne Park on June 12, 2020.

a group of people sitting at a table in front of a building: People take advantage of Stage 2 of Ontario's reopening by grabbing a seat at a patio at Lansdowne Park on June 12, 2020. © Francis Ferland/CBC People take advantage of Stage 2 of Ontario's reopening by grabbing a seat at a patio at Lansdowne Park on June 12, 2020.

(Francis Ferland/CBC)

Barber Menick, who has been cutting hair for 61 years, cuts a customer's hair in his barbershop filled with sports memorabilia in Montreal on June 15, 2020. Hairdressers, tattoo parlours and other personal-care businesses in the Montreal area reopened that day.

a group of people in a store: Barber Menick, who has been cutting hair for 61 years, cuts a customer's hair in his barbershop filled with sports memorabilia in Montreal, on Monday, June 15, 2020. Hairdressers, tattoo parlours and other personal-care businesses in the Greater Montreal area reopened Monday. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson © Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press Barber Menick, who has been cutting hair for 61 years, cuts a customer's hair in his barbershop filled with sports memorabilia in Montreal, on Monday, June 15, 2020. Hairdressers, tattoo parlours and other personal-care businesses in the Greater Montreal area reopened Monday. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

(Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)

Back to school

Miriam Murphy walks her daughter, Nancy Murphy, 5, to her first day of senior kindergarten at Portage Trail Community School in Toronto on Sept. 15, 2020 — six months after the COVID-19 pandemic ended the school year prematurely.

a person wearing a costume: Miriam Murphy walks her daughter, Nancy Murphy, 5, to her first day senior kindergarten at Portage Trail Community School, in Toronto, on Sept. 15, 2020 — six months after the COVID-19 pandemic ended the school year prematurely. © Evan Mitsui/CBC Miriam Murphy walks her daughter, Nancy Murphy, 5, to her first day senior kindergarten at Portage Trail Community School, in Toronto, on Sept. 15, 2020 — six months after the COVID-19 pandemic ended the school year prematurely.

(Evan Mitsui/CBC)

A kindergarten class is seen with individual plexiglass shields at the Marie-Claire Academy in Montreal.

a small child sitting on a table: A kindergarten class is seen with individual plexiglass shields at the Marie-Claire Academy in Montreal on Monday. © Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press A kindergarten class is seen with individual plexiglass shields at the Marie-Claire Academy in Montreal on Monday.

(Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)

Vaccines and variants amid 2nd wave

A box of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is delivered by a UPS worker to the Maimonides long-term care home in Montreal on Dec. 14, 2020.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: A box of Pfizer/BioNTEch COVID-19 vaccine is delivered from a UPS truck past news photographers to the Maimonides long term care home in Montreal, Quebec, Canada December 14, 2020. Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services/Handout via REUTERS NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.   TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY © Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services/Reuters A box of Pfizer/BioNTEch COVID-19 vaccine is delivered from a UPS truck past news photographers to the Maimonides long term care home in Montreal, Quebec, Canada December 14, 2020. Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services/Handout via REUTERS NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

(Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services/Reuters)

Registered pharmacy technician Tamara Rumsey prepares the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in Toronto on Dec. 15, 2020, for a group of personal support workers during a clinic run by the University Health Network.

a hand holding a cell phone: Registered Pharmacy Technician Tamara Rumsey prepares COVID-19 vaccines in Toronto on Dec. 15, 2020. The University Health Network held a vaccine clinic for workers at Ontario care homes hardest-hit by COVID-19. The group of mostly personal support workers are among the first in Canada to receive the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. © Evan Mitsui/CBC Registered Pharmacy Technician Tamara Rumsey prepares COVID-19 vaccines in Toronto on Dec. 15, 2020. The University Health Network held a vaccine clinic for workers at Ontario care homes hardest-hit by COVID-19. The group of mostly personal support workers are among the first in Canada to receive the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.

(Evan Mitsui/CBC)

A Canadian North Flight lands on the tarmac in Iqaluit on Dec. 30, 2020, carrying Nunavut's first doses of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine.

a large air plane on a runway: A Canadian North Flight lands on the tarmac in Iqaluit, Dec. 30, carrying Nunavut's first doses of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. © Jackie McKay/CBC A Canadian North Flight lands on the tarmac in Iqaluit, Dec. 30, carrying Nunavut's first doses of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine.

(Jackie McKay/CBC)

Margaret Watson, 94, a resident at Oakview Place long-term care residence, smiles after getting her COVID-19 vaccine on Jan. 11. She was the first member of the public to get the vaccine in Winnipeg.

(John Woods/The Canadian Press)

A body is removed from Roberta Place long-term care home, in Barrie, Ont., on Jan. 18. An outbreak caused by a coronavirus variant first detected in the United Kingdom has resulted in the deaths of 40 residents and one essential caregiver at the home as of Jan. 24.

a group of people walking in front of a building: The body of a deceased resident of Roberta Place long-term care home, in Barrie, Ont., is removed on Jan. 18, 2021. The Canadian Red Cross has been deployed to help manage a major outbreak at the seniors' home — one of the hardest-hit by COVID-19 in Ontario. © Evan Mitsui/CBC The body of a deceased resident of Roberta Place long-term care home, in Barrie, Ont., is removed on Jan. 18, 2021. The Canadian Red Cross has been deployed to help manage a major outbreak at the seniors' home — one of the hardest-hit by COVID-19 in Ontario.

(Evan Mitsui/CBC)

Novavax deal won’t speed up vaccine rollout, but experts still say it’s a ‘big win’ .
Canada's freshly inked deal to produce the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine in Canada won't yield doses until the end of the year -- but that doesn't mean it's not helpful, experts say. Read more: Canada inks deal to produce Novavax COVID-19 vaccine

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