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Canada Johnson & Johnson vaccine approved in Canada. How does it compare to the others?

23:06  05 march  2021
23:06  05 march  2021 Source:   globalnews.ca

AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson vaccines — where is Canada at on approvals?

  AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson vaccines — where is Canada at on approvals? The COVID-19 vaccines are among those still awaiting a green light from Health Canada, but the shots are quickly picking up steam in other parts of the world. With shortfalls in deliveries from vaccines already approved -- Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech -- there is increasing pressure on the health agency to secure more options and get more shots into the arms of Canadians.

Unlike the three others approved , Johnson & Johnson ’s vaccine requires only a single dose, which could help Prime Minister Justin Trudeau achieve his target of vaccinating every Canadian that wants one by September. Procurement Minister Anita Anand said in an interview Thursday it was “ highly likely” that timeline will The government has faced criticism over the slow pace of vaccinations . The country has administered just 5.7 doses per 100 people, according to the Bloomberg Vaccine Tracker, while the U.S. and U.K. have given 24.9 and 32.9 doses for each 100 of their citizens, respectively.

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine differs from the others approved so far in that it delivers protection from developing COVID-19 symptoms with a single shot rather than two doses. Dr. Marc Berthiaume, director of the bureau of medical science at Health Canada , said during a press conference on Thursday that he expects there will be good news on the approval of that vaccine shortly. “The Johnson & Johnson vaccine should be available in the next few days," he said, referring to the vaccine approval -- officials said the specifics of any possible deliveries are still being worked out.

a close up of a bottle: A vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine is displayed at South Shore University Hospital, Wednesday, March 3, 2021 in Bay Shore, N.Y. Janssen Pharmaceuticals is a division of Johnson & Johnson. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) © (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) A vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine is displayed at South Shore University Hospital, Wednesday, March 3, 2021 in Bay Shore, N.Y. Janssen Pharmaceuticals is a division of Johnson & Johnson. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Canada has now approved four different coronavirus vaccines after giving the green light to Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 shot.

Johnson & Johnson's single-dose shot joins a growing arsenal of vaccines that include shots from Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca to protect Canadians against COVID-19.

Read more: Canada approves Johnson & Johnson’s 1-shot COVID-19 vaccine

Canada approves AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine

  Canada approves AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine The approval of AstraZeneca's vaccine follows that of Pfizer and Moderna, both of which also require two doses. The AstraZeneca shot is less effective in clinical trials than its rivals' injections — 62 per cent versus high 90s — but offers distinct benefits. Read more: AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson vaccines — where is Canada at on approvals? One major advantage is in logistics. The shot can be stored and transported at normal refrigerated temperatures, unlike its leading mRNA-based competitors, which require ultra-cold storage.

Johnson & Johnson 's single-dose shot, made in partnership with Janssen Pharmaceuticals, differs from the other two in several ways. It 's made differently and, at first glance, might appear to be less effective. Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. But that does not necessarily mean the Johnson & Johnson What's more, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine ’s effectiveness against severe disease was found to increase over time — to more than 90 percent within a month and a half after vaccination . What all of this means in practice is that even if a vaccinated person is infected with the coronavirus

OTTAWA — Health Canada is just "days away" from deciding whether to approve Johnson and Johnson 's COVID-19 vaccine . If that happens it will add a fourth option to Canada 's efforts to immunize our way to an end to the pandemic and the first to require only one dose. Dr. Supriya Sharma, the chief medical adviser at Health Canada , says she is concerned about vaccine hesitancy and of course would prefer it if the science around vaccines never changed. But Sharma says that is not how science works and it would be irresponsible not to adjust the guidelines for vaccines as more

"At this time, we consider all available vaccines to be effective," said Dr. Supriya Sharma, Health Canada’s chief medical advisor, at a press conference on Friday.

"Our advice to Canadians is to get whichever vaccine is available to you."

Here's a closer look at all the vaccines that Canada has approved so far:

Johnson & Johnson

Unlike Pfizer and Moderna's vaccines, the Johnson & Johnson shot is an adenovirus-based vaccine.

It was built using a kind of virus, which causes colds in chimpanzees.

The adenovirus is altered to carry a gene for the coronavirus protein, which can then train a person’s immune system to recognize the actual coronavirus if it ever enters the body.

Video: Coronavirus: Health officials urge people to take whichever vaccine available regardless of efficacy rate

COVID-19: Ontario reports 1,258 new cases; Health Canada approves AstraZeneca vaccine

  COVID-19: Ontario reports 1,258 new cases; Health Canada approves AstraZeneca vaccine What you need to know, at a glance Ontario reported 1,258 new cases of COVID-19 Friday, and 28 more deaths. There are 683 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the province (down four in the last day), with the number of patients in ICU up by one, for a total of 284. Friday’s case total includes 52 in Ottawa, 11 in Eastern Ontario, 10 in Renfrew County and District, four in Leeds, Grenville & Lanark, and three in Hastings Prince Edward. After falling daily since mid-January, the number of active cases provincewide up for the second day, to a total of 10,294 Ontario’s science advisors say prioritizing COVID-19 vaccinations based on neighbourhood as well as age could prevent thousan

With the approval of Moderna’s coronavirus vaccine Wednesday, Canada now has two shots to combat the pandemic — with enough doses on order to inoculate every Canadian by next fall. The federal government has signed agreements with Moderna for 40 million doses of its two-dose vaccine . Yet there are also deals signed with four other vaccine makers to eventually deliver up to 282 million combined doses of their shots, provided they’re approved for use by Health Canada . Two of those vaccines — one by Janssen and Johnson & Johnson , the other by AstraZeneca — are

Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) only has a few million doses of its COVID-19 vaccine in its inventory even though regulatory authorization could just be weeks away, Reuters reported Wednesday. What Happened: The revelation regarding the vaccine stock was made by Jeffrey Zients, the Janssen’s shot also eliminates the need for ultracold storage, which is required for the other two approved vaccines . The United States faces a vaccine crunch as both Pfizer and Moderna have promised to deliver 200 million doses by the end of March, but fewer than 72 million doses have been

It only requires one dose and has been approved for use in individuals aged 18 and older and is effective in older adults, Sharma said.

"Almost 20 per cent of the participants in the clinical trials were 65 years of age and older, and no differences in the safety or efficacy were seen compared to the younger groups," she said.

Read more: Is a single COVID-19 vaccine dose enough for those previously infected?

The shot is significantly easier to ship and store, as it can be kept in a refrigerator (between 2 C and 8 C) for at least three months — much longer than the Moderna vaccine — rather than a freezer.

In clinical trials, it showed an overall efficacy of 66 per cent in preventing moderate to severe COVID-19, Sharma said.

Canada has pre-ordered 10 million doses of the vaccine, with options to order up to 28 million more.

AstraZeneca

AstraZeneca's two-dose shot was approved for use on Feb. 26.

If AstraZeneca isn’t widely recommended for seniors, who should get the vaccine?

  If AstraZeneca isn’t widely recommended for seniors, who should get the vaccine? While it's understandable to want more precise data, experts say what we know now doesn't mean the shot is unsafe for seniors, nor should it erode what are clear benefits.On Friday, Health Canada approved the vaccine for people over the age of 18. But, days later, the committee that advises the Government of Canada on vaccines seemed to contradict that.

Bahrain authorizes Johnson & Johnson ’s vaccine for emergency use. China gives conditional approval to the Sinovac vaccine . PHASE 3 EFFICACY TRIALS: Scientists give the vaccine to thousands of people and wait to see how many become infected, compared with volunteers who Other RNA vaccines made by Pfizer and Moderna have to be kept frozen at chillier temperatures.

In Canada , Health Canada is responsible for approval and regulation of vaccines (and other pharmaceuticals), while the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) is responsible for public health, emergency preparedness and response, and infectious and chronic disease control and prevention. the rollout of the vaccination program.[35] According to the same Times columnist, who had interviewed those involved in " vaccine development, epidemiology, infection control and medical supply chains", they all said it was not surprising that Canada 's rollout was not happening as planned.

Like the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, this is also an adenovirus-based vaccine and can be stored at normal fridge temperature — meaning the doses are much easier both to ship and to keep.

The Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine was found to be 62 per cent effective in a two-dose clinical trial.

Read more: If AstraZeneca isn’t widely recommended for seniors, who should get the vaccine?

The protocol for giving the booster shot set and used in the clinical trials for AstraZenenca was one month after the first dose.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended that the AstraZeneca vaccine can be given with an interval of eight to 12 weeks.

Health Canada has approved the shot for all adults — anyone 18 years and older.

But Canada’s National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) is not currently recommending the AstraZeneca vaccine for people 65 or older "due to limited information on the efficacy of this vaccine in this age group at this time.”

The first two phases of AstraZeneca’s trials did not include people over the age of 65.

How approval of Johnson & Johnson's 'one and done' COVID-19 vaccine could change Canada's vaccination game

  How approval of Johnson & Johnson's 'one and done' COVID-19 vaccine could change Canada's vaccination game A one-dose COVID-19 vaccine is now approved for use in Canada — and vaccine experts say the shot from Johnson & Johnson could give a major boost to countrywide vaccination efforts while offering a "real solution" to hasten the end of the pandemic. Health Canada authorized its use and released details during a Friday morning announcement. The vaccine, made by a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, is a non-replicating viral vector option and, unlike the three other vaccines previously approved for Canadian use, was tested during clinical trials as a single shot.

Canada has purchased 20 million doses — enough to vaccine 10 million Canadians.

Moderna

Moderna's mRNA vaccine was the second COVID-19 shot approved for use in Canada back on Dec. 23.

Moderna's shot was manufactured using mRNA-based technology, a relatively new way to make vaccines.

Instead of injecting a deactivated form of the virus, the mRNA vaccine uses a component of the virus called messenger RNA that basically contains the genetic instructions for the human body to make the specific spike protein of the coronavirus.

By doing this, the immune system learns to recognize and respond to that specific protein, meaning it can more quickly mount a response if the virus enters the body.

The two doses are supposed to be given four weeks or 28 days apart, but many provinces are now extending that time to up to four months amid shortages, as recommended by NACI.

Clinical trials found Moderna’s vaccine to be 94.1 per cent effective in preventing COVID-19.

The Moderna doses can be stored in a freezer between -25 C and -15 C. The Moderna doses can be stored in a freezer between -25 C and -15 C. Territories have been guaranteed priority access to this particular vaccine, as it’s easier to safely transport and store compared to Pfizer's — which was approved first.

COVID-19: Canada approves J&J single-dose vaccine; Pfizer speeds up deliveries; Stay-home orders in Toronto area, North Bay to be lifted

  COVID-19: Canada approves J&J single-dose vaccine; Pfizer speeds up deliveries; Stay-home orders in Toronto area, North Bay to be lifted What you need to know, at a glance Canada will get an extra 1.5 million doses of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine this month as deliveries are “ahead of schedule.” Another one million doses — originally set to arrive in the summer — are now expected in both April and May Canada had contracts for six million total doses by the end of March, but with the accelerated shipments, will now receive eight million doses Canada can expect 12.8 million Pfizer doses arriving from April to June. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is the fourth COVID-19 shot approved for use in Canada and the only one that requires just a single dose.

Canada’s agreement with Moderna is for 40 million doses — although the feds have the option of purchasing another 16 million in addition to that. The 40 million doses are enough to inoculate 20 million Canadians, over half of the population.

Pfizer

On Dec. 9, Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine became the first COVID-19 shot to get approval in the country.

Canada has 40 million Pfizer doses secured in its agreement with the manufacturer.

Like Moderna's jab, this is also an mRNA vaccine and requires two doses — which the company recommends be given three weeks or 21 days apart, as done in clinical trials.

Pfizer’s clinical trials were only conducted on those over the age of 16, which means that until further studies are completed in younger age groups, anyone under 16 years old is ineligible for the jab.

Read more: Provinces, territories can wait 4 months to administer 2nd COVID-19 shot, NACI says

Of the four vaccines, Pfizer is the most demanding about temperature. This vaccine requires ultra-cold storage, meaning it has to be transported and stored at -70 C. This makes the vaccine tricky to ship to remote regions, where the appropriate infrastructure is far more difficult to set up.

On Feb. 25, Pfizer-BioNTech requested a change to allow its COVID-19 vaccine to be kept at between -25 C and -15 C instead of the earlier approved storage condition of between -80 C and -60 C.

While Health Canada still endorses ultra-cold storage conditions for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, the department “after conducting a thorough review” said on Wednesday that the doses can now be stored and shipped “at standard freezer temperatures” for up to 14 days.

Video: Coronavirus: Health Canada rules Pfizer vaccine can be stored at standard temperatures

In terms of effectiveness, Pfizer takes the gold. At 95 per cent, it narrowly edges Moderna for a photo-finish.

Still, at the end of the day, Canadians should feel confident that any one of the three approved vaccines will cut off COVID-19’s claws and protect them from the worst outcomes of the virus.

"All vaccines will help Canadians to fight the pandemic," said Health Canada’s Dr. Marc Berthiaume at Friday’s press conference.

"The efficacy rates may vary depending on the design and studies, but we feel that overall these are very good vaccine choices."

— with files from Global News' Rachel Gilmore

Canadians shouldn't shop around for vaccines with higher efficacy rates, experts say .
The approval of a fourth vaccine should not give Canadians the green light to hold off on getting inoculated and shop for other shots with higher efficacy rates, medical experts say. That attitude will end up lengthening the time it takes to get the pandemic under control, said Dr. Peter Liu, scientific director of Ontario's COVID-19 Science Advisory Table. "This is absolutely a no go," he said. "If people start to do that, they actually prevent Canadians from moving slowly back to normal." On Friday, Health Canada approved the use of Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine.

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