•   
  •   
  •   

Canada Supreme Court won't hear bid to challenge thalidomide settlement

22:15  10 june  2021
22:15  10 june  2021 Source:   thecanadianpress.com

Supreme Court won't hear bid to challenge thalidomide settlement

  Supreme Court won't hear bid to challenge thalidomide settlement OTTAWA — The Supreme Court of Canada will not hear a bid to challenge approval of a settlement agreement for Canadians born with birth defects because of the drug thalidomide. The Federal Court approved the agreement — the government's third effort over the years to provide compensation — finding it to be fair and reasonable. Five class members who were dissatisfied with the court's approval unsuccessfully asked the Federal Court of Appeal for permission to appeal. The Supreme Court did not provide reasons for refusing to examine the matter.

OTTAWA — The Supreme Court of Canada will not hear a bid to challenge approval of a settlement agreement for Canadians born with birth defects because of the drug thalidomide.

a close up of a keyboard © Provided by The Canadian Press

The Federal Court approved the agreement — the government's third effort over the years to provide compensation — finding it to be fair and reasonable.

Five class members who were dissatisfied with the court's approval unsuccessfully asked the Federal Court of Appeal for permission to appeal.

The Supreme Court did not provide reasons for refusing to examine the matter.


Video: Federal panel calls for end to mandatory hotel quarantine rules (Global News)

Today in History - June 26

  Today in History - June 26 Today in History for June 26: On this date: In 1284, the Pied Piper of Hamelin led 130 German children to their deaths after being refused his fee for charming rats and mice into a river. In 1346, Britain defeated France in the "Battle of Crecy" -- in which a cannon was used, probably for the first time. In 1653, Spanish dramatist Lope Felix De Vega-Carpio died. He wrote more than 1,800 plays and could churn out as many as five, three-act plays in two weeks. In 1721, inoculation for human smallpox was introduced in Boston by Dr. Zabdiel Boylston, who injected his son and two slaves. In 1723, Dutch inventor Antony van Leeunwenhoek died. He developed the microscope.

Thalidomide was approved in Canada to treat morning sickness in pregnant women for less than a year in the early 1960s but it was available unofficially for several years both before and after that.

The drug caused major problems in fetuses, particularly shortened and malformed limbs.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 10, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Settlement reached on residential school 'day scholars' class-action lawsuit .
OTTAWA — A settlement has been reached in a class-action lawsuit against the federal government involving hundreds of First Nations people left out of residential-school compensation. The lawsuit was brought by Indigenous students known as “day scholars,” who attended the notorious residential schools but returned to their homes at night. Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett says the settlement will see survivors receive compensation of $10,000 each. To address additional harms suffered by the students at the school, Ottawa will also invest $50 million into a Day Scholars Revitalization Fund.

usr: 0
This is interesting!