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Canada Health Canada cracks down on UV wands; Will cheap flights get Canadians flying?: CBC's Marketplace cheat sheet

17:30  13 june  2021
17:30  13 june  2021 Source:   cbc.ca

Rupa Subramanya: Indigenous Canadians lack voting power. So politicians give them lip service

  Rupa Subramanya: Indigenous Canadians lack voting power. So politicians give them lip service The discovery of the remains of 215 children on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School has led to renewed soul searching among Canadians on the plight of the nation’s Indigenous peoples. The horrors of the residential school system, which was intended to assimilate Indigenous people, and which, according to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 2015 report amounted to “cultural genocide,” are but the tip of the iceberg. Indigenous Canadians, comprising First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples, lag behind other Canadians on every important indicator of economic and social well-being as well as human development.

Health Canada has announced new, strict measures to regulate UV wands and lights that may claim to kill viruses like the coronavirus. © Stephanie Dudley/CBC Health Canada has announced new, strict measures to regulate UV wands and lights that may claim to kill viruses like the coronavirus.

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Airlines are offering cheap domestic flights to entice Canadians back to travel. But will it last?

Are you ready to take flight?

Despite pandemic and travel restrictions still in place in several provinces, Canada's major airlines are advertising discounted domestic flights to entice us to start flying again.

Share Despite Corona at the previous year: more than half of the passenger flights 2020 were short-haul flights

 Share Despite Corona at the previous year: more than half of the passenger flights 2020 were short-haul flights The number of flights declined 2020 overall because of the Corona pandemic. However, the share of short-haul flights remained at the level of 2019. © Photo: Boris Roessler / DPA short-haul flights made more than half of all flights last year. More than every second flight went over a short distance of less than 1000 kilometers last year.

Air Canada and WestJet are currently offering 20 per cent off base fares for domestic flights — some of which appear low even without the discount — through to the end of December.

The catch is that customers must book before Monday, and it's not clear if the prices will stay this low forever. 

Frederic Dimanche, director of the Ted Rogers School of Hospitality and Tourism Management at Ryerson University in Toronto, says he believes airlines have dropped their prices for two reasons: to make some quick cash after travel plummeted during the pandemic and to get Canadians to warm up to the idea of returning to air travel. Read more

a woman in a car: As provinces begin to ease their COVID-19 restrictions, Air Canada, WestJet and Air Transat are each offering cheap deals on domestic flights. © David J. Phillip/The Associated Press As provinces begin to ease their COVID-19 restrictions, Air Canada, WestJet and Air Transat are each offering cheap deals on domestic flights.

Health Canada cracks down on UV wands and lights

Health Canada has announced new, strict measures to regulate UV wands and lights that may claim to kill viruses like the coronavirus. 

Planning to travel this summer? Here’s what you should know

  Planning to travel this summer? Here’s what you should know From domestic restrictions and international requirements to COVID-19 insurance, here are some things to consider before you book that next trip.A "one-dose summer" — as touted by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau — is in the cards for Canada, with more than half the Canadian population having received at least a single shot of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Until now, hundreds of unregistered products have been advertised for sale in Canada without regulatory approval. But on Monday, Health Minister Patty Hajdu signed an interim order that will regulate the devices for the first time. 

This comes after Health Canada promised to review the devices following a Marketplace investigation that found most UV wands and devices on the market are not cleared for sale in Canada. 

Nursing homes with repeated violations continue to break law, despite Ontario's promise to crack down

After a year that revealed the cracks in the long-term care system, with 3,773 residents dying of COVID-19 in Ontario nursing homes, politicians promised better conditions for those living in long-term care. But some homes continue to be cited by provincial inspectors for serious violations of Ontario's Long-Term Care Act.

Health Canada regulates UV, ozone devices it says could pose risk to people

  Health Canada regulates UV, ozone devices it says could pose risk to people OTTAWA — Health Minister Patty Hajdu is regulating UV-emitting and ozone-producing cleaning devices she says pose a significant risk to Canadians and don't live up to their claims that they can help kill viruses like the one that causes COVID-19. Hajdu signed an interim order Monday requiring devices like UV wands and UV cellphone sanitizers, which emit ultraviolet radiation or generate ozone, to apply for authorization under the Pest Control Products Act. Previously the devices have not been regulated.

Last year, a CBC Marketplace investigation looking at thousands of provincial inspection reports revealed that 85 per cent of homes had broken the same section of the act repeatedly in a five-year period. Most faced no repercussions.

At Orchard Villa in Pickering, Ont., for example, 70 residents died of COVID-19 in the spring and early summer of 2020, the deadliest outbreak of the first wave in the province. Since then, the home has been cited twice for infection-prevention and control violations — once in November 2020 and once in April this year. 

"It's like nothing's changed," said Cathy Parkes, whose father Paul died in last year's outbreak. "You know, you take your eyes off for one second and things go back to the way they were." Read more

What else is going on?

Warming reduces transfer of oxygen from air to water, and boosts algae blooms that consume oxygen.

Most account agreements say banks can reverse deposits without explanation, Go Public reports.

With most compostable plastics going to landfills, there are calls for better regulation.

Why not tracking ethnicity, occupation data can undermine the COVID-19 fight

  Why not tracking ethnicity, occupation data can undermine the COVID-19 fight CBC News compared the COVID-19 data published by every province and region. Only a handful publish details on race, income, occupation and neighbourhood-specific breakdowns of infections and vaccinations — information that health officials and community leaders say helps them intervene quickly in hotspots. The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) requests this data from the provinces, but spokesperson Anna Madison said it is selectively and inconsistently reported, with only half of provinces sending data on race and occupation. She declined to say which provinces do not report this information.

Immediately stop using the Fisher-Price 4-in-1 Rock 'n Glide Soothers and the Fisher-Price 2-in-1 Soothe 'n Play Gliders and contact Fisher-Price to obtain a full or partial refund.

Marketplace needs your help

  Health Canada cracks down on UV wands; Will cheap flights get Canadians flying?: CBC's Marketplace cheat sheet © CBC

We're on a mission to find Canada's worst contract. They're long. They're wordy. They're hard to understand. But you've probably needed to sign a number of them: before opening up a bank account, getting a credit card, a cell phone, a warranty, or even while visiting a trampoline park. If you're stuck in a contract you think is unfair, one-sided, or downright bizarre, we want to hear about it. Email us at marketplace@cbc.ca

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Ottawa eases quarantine for vaccinated travellers, but won't give firm date for full reopening of U.S. border .
Federal cabinet ministers are refusing to outline a clear threshold for when the Canada-U.S. border can reopen for non-essential travel, saying instead that they are looking at a wide range of factors — and that even if Canada’s domestic numbers look good, the international situation may not allow for it.  Health Minister Patty Hajdu suggested that one key metric will be getting 75 per cent of eligible Canadians fully vaccinated. But she went on to list numerous other metrics that could play a role in reopening, including whether other countries have their own COVID-19 case rate under control.

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