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Canada A look at COVID-19 reopening plans across the country

12:45  16 july  2021
12:45  16 july  2021 Source:   msn.com

A look at COVID-19 reopening plans across the country

  A look at COVID-19 reopening plans across the country As COVID-19 vaccination rates increase and case numbers drop across the country, the provinces and territories have begun releasing the reopening plans for businesses, events and recreational facilities. Most of the plans are based on each jurisdiction reaching vaccination targets at certain dates, while also keeping the number of cases and hospitalizations down. Here's a look at what reopening plans look like across the country: Newfoundland and Labrador: The province's reopening plan begins with a transition period during which some health restrictions, like limits on gatherings, will loosen.

Here's a look at what reopening plans look like across the country : Newfoundland and Labrador: The province's reopening plan begins with a transition period during which some health restrictions, like limits on gatherings, will loosen. Requirements for testing and self-isolation lifted entirely for fully The province took the next step in its reopening plan on Canada Day when most COVID - 19 restrictions were removed and outdoor gatherings of up to 5,000 people got the go ahead. Restaurants and pubs no longer have limits on the number of diners, but people are still not allowed to mingle with those at

Here’s a look at what reopening plans look like across the country : Newfoundland and Labrador: The province’s reopening plan begins with a transition period during which some health restrictions, like limits on gatherings, will loosen. Nova Scotia will begin its fourth phase of reopening on Wednesday. Dr. Robert Strang says the decision is tied to strong COVID - 19 vaccine uptake and low, new daily case numbers. Under the new rules, retail stores can operate at full capacity, churches and other venues can operate at half capacity or with a maximum of 150 people, and up to 50 people can

As COVID-19 vaccination rates increase and case numbers drop across the country, the provinces and territories have begun releasing the reopening plans for businesses, events and recreational facilities.

a group of people crossing a street in front of a building © Provided by The Canadian Press

Most of the plans are based on each jurisdiction reaching vaccination targets at certain dates, while also keeping the number of cases and hospitalizations down.

Here's a look at what reopening plans look like across the country:

Newfoundland and Labrador:

The province's reopening plan begins with a transition period during which some health restrictions, like limits on gatherings, will loosen.

A look at COVID-19 reopening plans across the country

  A look at COVID-19 reopening plans across the country As COVID-19 vaccination rates increase and case numbers drop across the country, the provinces and territories have begun releasing the reopening plans for businesses, events and recreational facilities. Most of the plans are based on each jurisdiction reaching vaccination targets at certain dates, while also keeping the number of cases and hospitalizations down. Here's a look at what reopening plans look like across the country: Newfoundland and Labrador: The province's reopening plan begins with a transition period during which some health restrictions, like limits on gatherings, will loosen.

COVID - 19 Opening Leadership Team (COLT) forecasts a transition to the Sustained Reopening resumption stage for Fall 2021. This forecast is a prediction based on all available information, to serve as a basis for planning . The forecast could change if conditions change. CCOT will collaborate with the Office of COVID - 19 Reopening to develop and propose to the COLT reopening plans , including reopening criteria, timelines, and priorities. CCOT is not responsible for structuring, mandating, communicating, or evaluating compliance with health and safety protocols.

As COVID - 19 vaccination rates increase and case numbers drop across the country , the provinces and territories have begun releasing the reopening plans for businesses, events and recreational facilities. Most of the plans are based on each jurisdiction reaching vaccination targets at certain dates, while also keeping the number of cases and hospitalizations down. Here’s a look at what reopening plans look like across the country : Newfoundland and Labrador: The province’s reopening plan begins with a transition period during which some health restrictions, like limits on gatherings

Requirements for testing and self-isolation lifted entirely for fully vaccinated Canadian travellers on Canada Day, while those requirements will ease over the next few months for travellers with just one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

If case counts, hospitalization and vaccination targets are met, the province expects to reopen dance floors as early as Aug. 15, and lift capacity restrictions on businesses, restaurants and lounges while maintaining physical distancing between tables.

As early as Sept. 15, mask requirements for indoor public spaces will be reviewed.

Nova Scotia:

Nova Scotia has further reduced COVID-19 public health orders, and the province's top public health doctor is calling on citizens to stop hesitating on getting the Moderna vaccine.

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Here's a look at what reopening plans look like across the country : Newfoundland and Labrador: The province's reopening plan begins with a transition period during which some health restrictions, like limits on gatherings, will loosen. The second stage of reopening was originally slated to begin July 2, but the province moved the plan forward two days, saying COVID - 19 vaccination targets have been met. Indoor cinemas and public concerts still won't be permitted with capacity restrictions until the third stage.

The Scandinavian countries . Sweden has announced that in line with the country ’s reopening plan , as of today, July 15, several measures that were introduced as a response to the COVID - 19 pandemic will be lifted inside the country , SchengenVisaInfo.com reports. But stricter measures across Europe and new travel restrictions cannot be ruled out and “appear inevitable as governments try to contain the further spread of the virus, with tighter entry restrictions likely – especially in northern countries whose economies are not particularly reliant on tourism,” The Guardian predicts.

Nova Scotia began its fourth phase of reopening on Wednesday.

Dr. Robert Strang says the decision is tied to strong COVID-19 vaccine uptake and low, new daily case numbers.

Under the new rules, retail stores can operate at full capacity, churches and other venues can operate at half capacity or with a maximum of 150 people, and up to 50 people can attend outdoor family gatherings.

Other restrictions that ended on Wednesday include capacity limits for dance classes, music lessons and indoor play spaces.

Organized sports practices, games, league play, competitions and recreation programs can involve up to 25 people indoors and 50 people outdoors without physical distancing.

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In the post- Covid - 19 age, he hopes, people won’t see the gym as an elite place where only fitness fanatics are welcome. While the pandemic forced us to reorganise our shared spaces, lockdown has given us the time to rethink what we want our social life to look like. And although we may have to wave goodbye to the lively, crowded bars, theatres and gyms that we used to love, at least for some As an award-winning science site, BBC Future is committed to bringing you evidence-based analysis and myth-busting stories around the novel coronavirus. You can read more of our Covid - 19 coverage here.

Georgia’s reopening plans rolled out ahead of most other states, with gyms, bowling alleys, theatres, hair salons and restaurants all in motion. Florida made headlines in early May when citizens flooded beaches as the state reopened . - Did you follow all of the COVID - 19 rules, as they updated and downgraded or morphed into something else, over the past several months in Canada? Did you break any of those rules with or without knowing it at the time? Guest: Jason Disano Director of the Canadian Hub for Applied and Social Research at the University of Saskatchewan.

Day camps can operate with 30 campers per group plus staff and volunteers, following the day camp guidelines. In addition, professional and amateur arts and culture rehearsals and performances can involve up to 25 people indoors and 50 outdoors without physical distancing.

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Meanwhile, fully vaccinated residents of long-term care homes can now have visitors in their rooms and visit their family's homes, including for overnight stays.

New Brunswick:

New Brunswick has moved into Phase 2 of its reopening plan, having reached its goal of having 20 per cent of people 65 or older vaccinated with two doses of a COVID vaccine.

Premier Blaine Higgs says the change opens travel without the need to isolate to all of Nova Scotia after opening to P.E.I. and Newfoundland and Labrador.

Travellers from elsewhere in Canada who've had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine can enter the province without the need to isolate, while those who haven't had a shot must still isolate and produce a negative test before being released from quarantine.

Other changes allow restaurants, gyms and salons to operate at full capacity as long as customer contact lists are kept.

In the third phase, the province will lift all COVID-19 restrictions.

Prince Edward Island:

Prince Edward Island has dropped its requirement that non-medical masks be worn in public indoor spaces.

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Chief public health officer Dr. Heather Morrison says masks are still encouraged to reduce the spread of COVID-19, and businesses are free to adopt stricter rules.

Officials say those who serve the public, such as in restaurants, retail stores and hair salons, should continue to wear a mask.

All health-care facilities will continue to require masks until 80 per cent of eligible P.E.I. residents are fully vaccinated.

Meanwhile, the province has allowed personal gatherings to increase so that up to 20 people can get together indoors and outdoors. Restaurants are allowed to have tables of up to 20. Special occasion events like backyard weddings and anniversary parties of up to 50 people hosted by individuals are permitted with a reviewed operational plan.

The province projects that on July 18 organized gatherings hosted by a business or other organization will be permitted with groups of up to 200 people outdoors or 100 people indoors.

On Sept. 12, the province expects physical distancing measures to be eased, as well as allowing personal and organized gatherings to go ahead without limits.

Quebec:

Quebec's government has removed capacity restrictions in retail stores across the province and reduced the two-metre physical distancing health order to one metre.

A look at COVID-19 reopening plans across the country

  A look at COVID-19 reopening plans across the country As COVID-19 vaccination rates increase and case numbers drop across the country, the provinces and territories have begun releasing the reopening plans for businesses, events and recreational facilities. Most of the plans are based on each jurisdiction reaching vaccination targets at certain dates, while also keeping the number of cases and hospitalizations down. Here's a look at what reopening plans look like across the country: Newfoundland and Labrador: The province's reopening plan begins with a transition period during which some health restrictions, like limits on gatherings, will loosen.

Quebecers from separate households are now required to keep a one-metre distance from one another indoors and outdoors instead of two metres.

The previous two-metre distance now applies only at places characterized by physical activity or singing.

The ceiling on customers at retail businesses also rises today, with sports venues allowed to accommodate 50 spectators indoors and 100 outdoors

Fans and those attending theatres or other performance venues must keep at least one empty seat between each other, and wearing a mask in public spaces remains mandatory.

All of Quebec is now at the lowest green alert level under the province's COVID-19 response plan as public health restrictions continue to ease.

Last month, the province permitted gyms and restaurant dining rooms to reopen. Supervised outdoor sports and recreation are also allowed in groups of up to 25 people.

Quebec ended its nightly curfew on May 28. It also lifted travel bans between regions and increased the number of people allowed to attend sporting events and festivals to 3,500.

Ontario:

Ontario moved to the third step of its reopening plan today, allowing for more indoor activities including restaurant dining and gym use, while larger crowds are permitted for outdoor activities.

Masking and physical distancing rules, however, remain in place.

Social gatherings are limited to 25 people indoors and 100 people outdoors. Religious services and other ceremonies can resume indoors with larger groups of people who are physically distanced.

A look at COVID-19 reopening plans across the country

  A look at COVID-19 reopening plans across the country As COVID-19 vaccination rates increase and case numbers drop across the country, the provinces and territories have begun releasing the reopening plans for businesses, events and recreational facilities. Most of the plans are based on each jurisdiction reaching vaccination targets at certain dates, while also keeping the number of cases and hospitalizations down. Here's a look at what reopening plans look like across the country: Newfoundland and Labrador: The province's reopening plan begins with a transition period during which some health restrictions, like limits on gatherings, will loosen.

Nightclubs and similar establishments can open to 25 per cent capacity. Crowd limits are expanding for retail stores and salons, which will be allowed to offer services that require masks to be removed.

Spectators are permitted at sporting events, concert venues, cinemas and theatres, with larger limits on crowds for outdoor events.

Museums, galleries, aquariums, zoos, bingo halls and amusement parks are also allowed to open with larger crowd limits on outdoor attractions.

Manitoba:

Manitoba will see loosened restrictions and extra freedoms for people who have received two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine as it moves into the second phase of its reopening plan on Saturday.

Indoor gatherings will be allowed for up to five people, on top of those who live in a household, and 25 people in indoor public spaces. Outdoor gatherings are expanded to 25 people on private property and 150 in public spaces.

Restaurants and bars are allowed up to 50 per cent capacity and opening hours are extended until midnight. Retail stores will be able to run at 50 per cent capacity or 500 people, whichever is lower. Fitness centres will be open at 50 per cent capacity, but masks will still be required.

Outdoor weddings and funerals will be able to have up to 150 people and indoor events will have a limit of 25. Faith-based gatherings will expand to half capacity or 150 people indoors.

Businesses, such as casinos, museums and movie theatres, can open at 50 per cent capacity but only fully vaccinated Manitobans can take part. An upcoming Blue Bombers CFL game will also be open fully to fans who are double-vaccinated.

Saskatchewan:

Saskatchewan has now removed all public health orders — including the province-wide mandatory masking order, as well as capacity limits on events and gathering sizes.

Premier Scott Moe says the province decided to go ahead with full implementation of Step 3 of its Reopening Roadmap because more than 70 per cent of residents over the age of 18 and 69 per cent of those over 12 have now received their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

Despite the lifting of the health orders, Regina and Saskatoon say they will still keep up extra cleaning in municipal facilities.

Alberta:

All remaining COVID-19 restrictions were lifted on July 1.

There are no longer limits on weddings, funerals or bans on indoor social gatherings. In addition, there are no more limits on gyms, sports or fitness activities, no more capacity limits at restaurants, in retail stores or in places of worship.

Anyone with a confirmed case of COVID-19 will still be required to self-isolate and protective measures at continuing care centres may remain.

The overall requirement for masks in public indoor spaces has ended, but masks may still be required in taxis, on public transit and on ride shares.

Some remaining COVID-19 health restrictions in continuing-care centres have also been eased.

The province says it is no longer limiting the number of visitors, since vaccination rates are rising and there have been few cases in care homes.

Visitors, however, still need to be screened for COVID-19 symptoms or known exposure, and masks are still required in common areas.

The province recommends people wear a mask at all times when visiting a care home if they have not been fully vaccinated, including children under 12.

Limits on dining and recreation activities have been eliminated, and residents are not required to be screened if they are re-entering the building or go into quarantine if they have gone off site.

British Columbia:

The province took the next step in its reopening plan on Canada Day when most COVID-19 restrictions were removed and outdoor gatherings of up to 5,000 people got the go ahead.

Restaurants and pubs no longer have limits on the number of diners, but people are still not allowed to mingle with those at other tables. Masks are no longer mandatory and recreational travel outside the province can resume.

Casinos and nightclubs are open for the first time in 16 months, but some barriers remain in place and socializing between tables is not allowed.

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry says some businesses may want people to continue wearing masks for now, and everyone should comply with those requirements or face the potential of fines.

Meanwhile, visitors to long-term care homes will soon be allowed to see loved ones without COVID-19 restrictions. Dr. Henry says the return to unscheduled visits will begin July 19, but staff will be required to report whether they have been immunized.

All COVID-19 restrictions are expected to be removed on Labour Day.

Nunavut:

Public health orders affecting what is allowed to open vary by community.

Restrictions in Iqaluit were eased on July 2. Travel restrictions in and out of Iqaluit have been lifted. A household can now have up to 10 people in their home and up to 50 people can gather outdoors.

Theatres and restaurants can also open at 25 per cent capacity or 25 people, whichever is less.

Meanwhile in Kinngait and Rankin Inlet, outdoor gatherings are limited to 100 people and those indoors are restricted to a household plus 15 people. Restaurants and bars are allowed to open for regular business at 50 per cent capacity, and there must be a two metre distance between tables, with no more than six people seated or around each table.

Northwest Territories:

Up to 25 people are allowed in a business that is following an approved COVID-19 plan. Households can have up to 10 people with a maximum of five guests from another household.

Non-essential travel outside the territory is not recommended, and leisure travel into the territory is not permitted.

The territory is no longer requiring masks to be worn in public places in Yellowknife and three other communities.

Chief public health officer Dr. Kami Kandola says it's still a good idea to wear a mask indoors when there is a crowd, poor ventilation, or shouting or singing.

Yukon:

Yukon has expanded the rules for gatherings, allowing up to 200 people to gather, as long as masks are worn indoors and other health protocols are followed.

Fully vaccinated people can have personal gatherings of up to 20 people indoors and 50 outdoors, but the unvaccinated are encouraged to stick with their “safe six” because they are at significantly higher risk.

Bars and restaurants are allowed to operate at full capacity with restrictions.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 16, 2021.

The Canadian Press

A look at COVID-19 reopening plans across the country .
As COVID-19 vaccination rates increase and case numbers drop across the country, the provinces and territories have begun releasing the reopening plans for businesses, events and recreational facilities. Most of the plans are based on each jurisdiction reaching vaccination targets at certain dates, while also keeping the number of cases and hospitalizations down. Here's a look at what reopening plans look like across the country: Newfoundland and Labrador: The province's reopening plan begins with a transition period during which some health restrictions, like limits on gatherings, will loosen.

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