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Canada Ground search plans at former Mohawk Institute Residential School in Ontario to be announced soon

06:51  20 july  2021
06:51  20 july  2021 Source:   cbc.ca

First Nation considering whether to excavate unmarked graves at former Kamloops residential school

  First Nation considering whether to excavate unmarked graves at former Kamloops residential school The apple orchard near the Kamloops Indian Residential School was chosen for a search for unmarked graves because a rib bone and tooth had previously been found in the area, and school survivors recalled digging graves for classmates, the local First Nation revealed at a press conference Thursday. “We are not here for retaliation. We are here for truth telling,” said Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc Chief Rosanne Casimir. “We seek peace and knowing, as soon as possible.

The site of the former Mohawk Institute residential school is now the Woodland Cultural Centre, which seeks to preserve and present Indigenous art, culture and language. (Erica Daniels/CBC). WARNING: This story contains details some readers may find distressing. That's an even harder discussion to have." The Ontario NDP, meanwhile, is pushing for the provincial government to use radar technology to investigate properties linked to residential schools . "There is an overwhelming amount of work to be done to ensure justice, dignity and equity for Indigenous people — from clean

Today, the former residential school has been renamed the Woodland Cultural Centre and is dedicated to preserving Indigenous history. But when Hill was there, it was an institution designed to erase that same culture from the children who walked through its doors. Their first night, the Hill sisters were assigned different bunks in the " To be in a position where I can now fight for justice for each of those children and their families, that's exactly what I'm going to do," he said. Monture walks past the memorial on the steps of the former Mohawk Institute Residential School in Brantford on June 24.

Mark Hill, elected chief of Six Nations of the Grand River, says the ground search at the former Mohawk Institute Residential School in Brantford, Ont., needs to start as soon as possible. © Bobby Hristova/CBC Mark Hill, elected chief of Six Nations of the Grand River, says the ground search at the former Mohawk Institute Residential School in Brantford, Ont., needs to start as soon as possible.

The elected chief of Six Nations of the Grand River says plans of a ground search at the former Mohawk Institute Residential School will be announced in the coming days.

It will be the start of a solemn journey "in the hopes of recovering all of our children," Mark Hill told reporters in Brantford, Ont., on Monday afternoon.

"We're hoping to start the search as soon as possible ... we need to find all of them," he said, with more than 100 shoes and toys spread out behind him on the stairs of the former residential school.

Canada's museums wrestle with history of residential schools

  Canada's museums wrestle with history of residential schools CBC News spoke with the CEO of the Canadian Museum For Human Rights, the CEO of the RCMP Heritage Centre and the artist behind an installation that chronicles the history of residential schools.In an email to CBC News, the museum in Gatineau, Que., said other changes it has planned include signage detailing the history and ongoing impact of residential schools, a content warning for exhibits that covered the topic, and a full review of its content.

BRANTFORD -- A search for unmarked graves at the former Mohawk Institute residential school in Brantford will likely begin in the coming weeks, a local Indigenous leader says. Six Nations of the Grand River Chief Mark Hill says he met with the federal Minister of Crown Indigenous Relations on Friday "Our turn is going to come when they start discovering things in our city," said Councillor John Sless. Council ultimately voted down a staff recommendation that asked for a memorial space to be installed at Victoria Park in downtown Brantford. The proposed memorial would have featured orange lights

Southern Ontario was home to two residential schools : Mohawk Institute Residential School in Brantford and Mount Elgin Indian Residential School (also known as Muncey Institute ) in Muncey. Mohawk Institute was the longest continually-operating residential school , from 1885 to 1970. It was initially operated by the Anglican church before the federal government assumed responsibility for the school in 1945, according to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation. At least 48 children are known to have died while students of the school . In its open letter, Six Nations writes that the school

Hill said the initiative will be survivor-led and a group is being formed to determine how to search the grounds.

He said work is underway to get funding from the federal and provincial governments, adding the initial ask was for $10 million.

Hill and survivors have been asking for a search at the site, in an effort to determine if it too is the location of unmarked graves, as have been discovered in other parts of Canada.

It all started in May, with the discovery of grave sites near a former school in Kamloops, B.C. Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation said preliminary findings from a survey of the site by ground-penetrating radar, combined with previous knowledge and oral history, indicated 215 children had been buried at the site.

Regina archbishop attends Cote First Nation gathering of residential school survivors

  Regina archbishop attends Cote First Nation gathering of residential school survivors The survivors shared painful, graphic stories of their time at the St. Philip's Indian Residential School in Kamsack, Sask.Survivors at the Cote First Nation told Regina Archbishop Donald Bolen he was brave for making the effort, but told him talk is useless without action.

image captionThe Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia once housed 500 children. Unmarked graves containing the remains of 215 children have been found in Canada at a former residential school set up to assimilate indigenous people. The discovery was announced on Thursday by the chief of the Tk'emlups te Secwepemc First Nation. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said it was a "painful reminder" of a "shameful chapter of our country's history". The First Nation is working with museum specialists and the coroner's office to establish the causes and timings of the deaths

2:25 Residential school survivor wants grounds of all former sites searched . WATCH ABOVE: It’s National Indigenous History Month but for many Indigenous community members, recent weeks have meant reliving the trauma of Canada’s residential school history. In part two of the story, Melanie “If I ever meet the prime minister, shake his hand … that was the whole idea in the beginning and he would see that,” Henry told Global News. The front steps of the former Mohawk Institute Residential School in Brantford, Ont., now called the Woodland Cultural Centre, have become a memorial after

a vintage photo of a house: Hill and survivors have been asking for a search at the site of the Mohawk Institute, to determine if it too is the location of unmarked graves. © Canada Dept. of the Interior/Library and Archives Canada/PA-043613 Hill and survivors have been asking for a search at the site of the Mohawk Institute, to determine if it too is the location of unmarked graves.

John Elliott, 84, said he was 10 years old when he entered the Mohawk Institute Residential School.

He was known as No. 72.


Video: Calls for the Canadian government to provide money for investigations at former residential school sites (Global News)

"The first day they brought us here, we ran away, me and my brother," he said.

Every Christmas, he and his brother would run back home to Six Nations.

Elliott said searching the grounds is a "great idea."

"I think there's a few boys around here."

The Mohawk Institute opened in 1828 as a day school for boys from the reserve before it started accepting boarders and girls in 1834.

"The intent was ... to change us, to make us someone other than who we are," Hill said.

Plaque donated by residential school teacher elders say abused children removed from Sask. church

  Plaque donated by residential school teacher elders say abused children removed from Sask. church Elders from the Cote First Nation in Saskatchewan have succeeded in getting a plaque removed from the property of St. Philip's Roman Catholic Church in Kamsack that they say was donated by a music teacher who sexually abused Indigenous boys who were forced to attend the St. Philip's Indian Residential School.According to elders, the plaque was donated by Ralph Gray, a longtime music teacher at the St. Philip's Indian Residential School, which operated from 1928 to 1969. Gray has since died.

Former Kamloops Residential School student Emma Baker reflects on the time she spent at the facility after Plans are being made to identify and return home the remains of more than 200 children buried in a mass grave A disturbing new discovery at a former residential school in B.C. gives a

This very first Indian [First Nations] residential school in Canada lasted until 1970, and, like in most residential schools , more than half of the children imprisoned there never returned. Many of them are buried all around the school ." The discovery of the mass graves of Mohawk children, uncovered by ground -penetrating radar at the Mohawk Institute comes on the heels of videotaped evidence by eyewitness William Coombes, who in Oct. 1964 witnessed Elizabeth Windsor, as Head of State of Canada and Head of the Church of England, visit an aboriginal school in Kamloops, British Columbia

He said the school closed in 1970, making it one of the oldest and longest running residential schools in Canada.

Two years later, the Woodland Cultural Centre opened in the school building. It serves as a museum and provides education about the Mohawk Institute's history.

a man wearing a hat: John Elliott, 84, said he was 10 when he entered the Mohawk Institute Residential School, where he remained with his brother from 1946 to 1952. © Bobby Hristova/CBC John Elliott, 84, said he was 10 when he entered the Mohawk Institute Residential School, where he remained with his brother from 1946 to 1952.

Dawn and Roberta Hill, sisters who survived the school, have been part of the planning to search the grounds.

They hope the nothing will be found, but still think the search is needed.

Roberta said she's optimistic, but won't believe the search is happening until she sees it.

"Until there's a cheque in hand, I don't trust anybody," she said.

"But I think ... it would look pretty bad if they did back out. The whole community wants this to be done."

Do you have information about unmarked graves, children who never came home or residential school staff and operations? Email your tips to CBC's new Indigenous-led team investigating residential schools: WhereAreThey@cbc.ca.

‘Look for our children’: New AFN chief says every residential school will be examined .
Speaking with Global News on Saturday, RoseAnne Archibald delved deeper into her major priorities as the AFN's incoming national chief."We have residential school survivors who are still suffering, their children are suffering, their grandchildren are suffering," said Archibald, who earlier this week became the first female chief to lead the group in charge of being the voice of more than 600 First Nations across Canada.

usr: 16
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