•   
  •   
  •   

Canada Live updates: Leaders face off in second federal election debate in French

02:05  09 september  2021
02:05  09 september  2021 Source:   montrealgazette.com

Live updates: Leaders face off in only federal election debate in English

  Live updates: Leaders face off in only federal election debate in English This is the Montreal Gazette’s live coverage of tonight’s federal leaders’ debate. Questions/comments? ariga@postmedia.com Top updates: Ahead of debate, leaders agree on something, urge Canadians to get vaccinated Leaders arrive at debate site On Twitter, leaders focus on vaccinations, economy and getting the voting out Welcome to our live coverage Here’s the agenda for tonight’s debate Leaders gearing up for English-language debate tonight after French joust Tonight’s debate could be crucial, pollster says Too close to call – Liberals and Conservatives running neck and neck, polls suggest François Legault favours minority Conservative government Lacklustre secon

Five federal party leaders will face off in the first of two official election debates Wednesday night in what may well be their best chance to sway voters before election day on Sept. That said, the commission reported that its surveys found no measurable difference in intended turnout or change in vote intention between Canadians who watched the debates and those who didn’t. Tonight’s French debate begins at 8 p.m. ET. Topics to be discussed are climate change, the cost of living and public finances, Indigenous Peoples and cultural identity, justice and foreign policy, and health care and the

Five federal party leaders will face off in the first of two official election debates Wednesday night in what may well be their best chance to sway voters before election day on Sept. That said, the commission reported that its surveys found no measurable difference in intended turnout or change in vote intention between Canadians who watched the debates and those who didn’t. Tonight’s French debate begins at 8 p.m. ET. Topics to be discussed are climate change, the cost of living and public finances, Indigenous Peoples and cultural identity, justice and foreign policy, and health care and the

Justin Trudeau, Erin O'Toole, Jagmeet Singh, Yves-François Blanchet posing for the camera: From left: Liberal leader Justin Trudeau, Conservative leader Erin O'Toole, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet and Green Party Leader Annamie Paul. © Provided by The Gazette From left: Liberal leader Justin Trudeau, Conservative leader Erin O'Toole, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet and Green Party Leader Annamie Paul.

This is the Montreal Gazette’s live coverage of tonight’s federal leaders’ debate. Questions/comments? ariga@postmedia.com

Top updates:

  • Trudeau and O’Toole neck and neck with less than two weeks left in campaign: Leger poll
  • Welcome to our live coverage
  • Tonight’s French debate, Thursday’s English debate pivotal for federal leaders
  • In 2019, the Liberals narrowly outpaced the Bloc in Quebec
  • The Greens were poised for a breakthrough in 2019. Now their woes may impact the wider election
  • Opinion: With two weeks to go, the real campaign is beginning
  • Opinion: No room for error in Round 2 of federal leaders’ debates
  • Opinion: With two weeks to go, can Justin Trudeau reverse the slide?
  • Opinion: Justin Trudeau will have to do better in Round 2 of debates
  • Quebec Premier François Legault has a federal election shopping list
  • Sept. 20 is election day, with advance polls set to open Friday – here’s how to vote
6:20 p.m.

Parties focus on climate change, economy, the need for change

Ahead of tonight’s debate, the five parties taking part are engaging with their followers with tweets about climate change, the economy and the need for change.

COVID-19, affordability, reconciliation among topics in Canada election debates

  COVID-19, affordability, reconciliation among topics in Canada election debates The English language debate will also feature sections on leadership and accountability, as well as climate, while the French debate will cover justice and foreign policy. Recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, affordability and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples will be among the five topics discussed among the party leaders at Thursday's English language debate for the federal election.

Five federal party leaders will face off in the first of two official election debates Wednesday night in what may well be their best chance to sway voters before election day on Sept. 20. With less than two weeks to go, millions of voters are expected to tune in for the two -hour French debate and Thursday’s English Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, Bloc Quebecois Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet and Green Party Leader Annamie Paul will participate in both debates . Read more: Conservative lead growing slightly as Liberal, NDP election

Five federal party leaders will face off in the first of two official election debates Wednesday night in what may well be their best chance to sway voters before election day on Sept. 20. With less than two weeks to go, millions of voters are expected to tune in for tonight’s two -hour French debate and Thursday’s People’s Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier did not meet the criteria established by the independent leaders ’ debate commission for participation. Both debates , organized by consortiums of broadcasters, are being held at the Museum of Canadian History in Gatineau, Que., just across the

6:15 p.m.

Trudeau and O’Toole neck and neck with less than two weeks left in campaign: Leger poll

The Liberals and Conservatives are locked in a close race, according to polls.

Erin O’Toole’s momentum seems to have stalled as Conservative and Liberal support is at a deadlock just hours before the second French debate of this federal election, according to a Postmedia-Léger poll published this afternoon .

Trudeau on defence as opposition leaders fight for points in English election debate

  Trudeau on defence as opposition leaders fight for points in English election debate Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau defended his government's handling of China and the detainment of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor when challenged by Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole, saying "you can't be lobbing tomatoes across the Pacific." Bloc Quebecois Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet also challenged Trudeau, saying while people can't be "throwing tomatoes" as a solution, he said the Liberal leader's record on human rights is "not perfect."

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, second from left, speaks as Green Party Leader Elizabeth May, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, People's Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier, Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet and NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh look on during the federal leaders ' debate in Gatineau, Que., Monday, Oct. The six main party leaders faced each other for the second time on Thursday night in the official Leaders ’ Debates Commission’s French debate . You can read and watch highlights from the two -hour event in our archived live blog below.

Wednesday's debate is expected to last more than two hours as both candidates try to appeal to undecided voters. In the first round on April 23, Macron, a 39-year-old former banker, won 24 percent of the votes, while Le Pen took 21.3 percent of the votes. Centrist Emmanuel Macron and far-right leader Marine Le Pen will face off in a live , televised debate tonight, four days before the second round of the French presidential election .

“We have a neck-and-neck race,” said Léger executive vice-president Andrew Enns

This chart is from that Léger poll.

table © Provided by The Gazette

The following charts are from the latest survey by Nanos , for CTV News and The Globe and Mail.

chart, line chart © Provided by The Gazette chart, line chart © Provided by The Gazette

And these charts are from 338Canada , an electoral projection website managed by P.J. Fournier.

chart, bar chart © Provided by The Gazette chart © Provided by The Gazette chart © Provided by The Gazette

6 p.m.

Welcome to our live coverage

Good evening.

Welcome to our live coverage of the second French-language leaders’ debate in advance of the Sept. 20 federal election.

I’ll be here throughout the night, with colleague Philip Authier, the Montreal Gazette’s Quebec City bureau chief, also providing debate updates.

The debate starts at 8 p.m.

Last week, in the first French debate, only four leaders took part, with the Green Party left out by the organizers at TVA.

Tonight, five federal leaders will be on the stage – Liberal Justin Trudeau, Conservative Erin O’Toole, the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh, the Bloc Québécois’ Yves-Francois Blanchet and Annamie Paul of the Green Party.

The Latest: Leaders face off in French-language debate, first of two official events

  The Latest: Leaders face off in French-language debate, first of two official events The Latest on the French-language leaders' debate among Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet and Green Party Leader Annamie Paul (all times local): 11:15 p.m. NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh says government needs to have the ability to immediately remove online misinformation that incites hate. Otherwise, he says, the issue is left in the hands of social media companies that are not equipped to take action, and don't appear particularly willing to step in.

The event is being organized by the Debate Broadcast Group, which was selected by the Leaders’ Debates Commission , an independent federal entity.

Maxime Bernier of the People’s Party of Canada was not invited because it did not meet the criteria established by the commission. A former Conservative minister and leadership candidate, Bernier lost his seat in the last election.

The Debate Broadcast Group’s English debate – the only one scheduled – will take place tomorrow, starting at 9 p.m.

Both debates are being held at the Museum of Canadian History in Gatineau, across the river from Parliament Hill.

Tonight’s debate will cover five themes, the Debate Broadcast Group says :

  • Climate
  • Cost of living and Public finances
  • Indigenous peoples, Cultural industries, and Cultural identity
  • Justice and Foreign policy
  • Pandemic and Healthcare

The debate will include five segments, each corresponding to one of the five themes. All five segments will include the following:

  • Question from a voter
  • Leader-to-leader debate
  • Leader-to-leader-to-leader debate
  • Question from a journalist to each leader
  • Open debate (all five leaders)

Fifty-four per cent of Canadians say they will likely watch one of this week’s debates, according to a poll published today by Léger. It was conducted for Postmedia.

Canada’s 2021 election: Here’s your last minute voter’s guide

  Canada’s 2021 election: Here’s your last minute voter’s guide With latest polling finding Liberals and Conservatives at a dead heat, here's what you need to know about voting in Canada's 2021 election.Canadians are girding to hit the polls in an historic election taking place amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

table © Provided by The Gazette

6 p.m.

Tonight’s French debate, Thursday’s English debate pivotal for federal leaders

Five federal party leaders will face off in the first of two official election debates Wednesday evening in what may well be their best chance to sway voters before election day on Sept. 20.

With less than two weeks to go, millions of voters are expected to tune in for Wednesday’s two-hour French debate and Thursday’s English debate.

The debates come as opinion polls suggest the Liberals and Conservatives are stuck in a tight two-way race, with the NDP and Bloc Québécois poised to determine which of the two main parties emerges victorious.

Read our preview of tonight’s debate .

6 p.m.

In 2019, the Liberals narrowly outpaced the Bloc in Quebec

There are 338 seats in the House of Commons, 78 of which are in Quebec.

Here are the Quebec results of the last election – on Oct. 21, 2019– by party:

  • 35 Liberal
  • 32 Bloc Québécois
  • 10 Conservative
  • 1 NDP

And here are the national results by party

  • 157 Liberal
  • 121 Conservative
  • 32 Bloc Québécois
  • 24 New Democratic Party
  • 1 Independent
6 p.m.

The Greens were poised for a breakthrough in 2019. Now their woes may impact the wider election

Green Party Leader Annamie Paul was not invited to last year’s debate but will be on stage in the debates tonight and tomorrow.

Heading into the 2019 election, the Green Party seemed poised for a breakthrough. Today they are on the defensive, fending off a potential slide back into obscurity.

Their struggles, if current polling proves accurate, could carry a wider impact on the 2021 election, potentially nudging voters toward a rejuvenated NDP in a handful of critical races in urban British Columbia. A surge in support for the NDP, by extension, could threaten Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau’s bid to regain his parliamentary majority, which is likely to be decided by fewer than 20 ridings — a handful of which are located in the progressive-minded southwestern corner of B.C.

Cost of living, affordable housing key topics raised in federal leaders debate, Albertans say

  Cost of living, affordable housing key topics raised in federal leaders debate, Albertans say Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau and Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole discuss COVID-19 vaccination policies in post-debate scrums with reporters. NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh says his party wants to boost taxes on the wealthy and Green Party Leader Annamie Paul says she'd like to see smaller parties find a way to get more attention during election campaigns.

Read our full story.

5:45 p.m.

Recap: Leaders face off in first federal election debate in French

Justin Trudeau, Erin O'Toole, Jagmeet Singh, Yves-François Blanchet are posing for a picture © Provided by The Gazette

Six days ago, Liberal Justin Trudeau, Conservative Erin O’Toole, the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh and the Bloc Québécois’ Yves-Francois Blanchet squared off in the first French debate.

You can read my live blog of that debate here.

And here are the brief press conferences each leader held after the debate:

5:45 p.m.

Right-wing outlet wins court battle to cover leaders’ debates

A judge in the Federal Court of Canada has ruled the Leaders’ Debates Commission incorrectly denied Rebel News Network accreditation to Wednesday’s French-language and Thursday’s English-language competition between the major party leaders.

In a letter filed in court, the debates commissioner had cited the outlet’s fundraising campaigns to raise money to oppose policies, including COVID-19 vaccine passports, a federal bill to amend the Broadcasting Act, the federal government’s quarantine hotel requirements and to constitutionally challenge Saskatchewan’s lockdown law.

Read our full story.

5:45 p.m.

Opinion: With two weeks to go, the real campaign is beginning

“With three weeks down and only 13 days until the election, it may be that the real campaign is only now beginning. The Liberals must hope so, while the Conservatives may be concerned about having peaked too soon”

Read the full column by L. Ian MacDonald , editor of Policy Magazine and a former speechwriter for Conservative Prime Minister Brian Mulroney.

5:45 p.m.

Opinion: No room for error in Round 2 of federal leaders’ debates

“While Justin Trudeau doesn’t have to worry about his seats on the island, the expected Bloc/Conservative battles outside of Montreal could produce surprises because of unusual vote splits.

Missed the federal election French language debate? Here are the highlights

  Missed the federal election French language debate? Here are the highlights From a heated moment between the Liberal and Bloc Quebecois leaders to a clash on the ban on assault-style weapons, here are the highlights from tonight's French language debate.Justin Trudeau, Jagmeet Singh, Erin O'Toole, Yves-Francois Blanchet and Annamie Paul duked it out on topics including climate, Indigenous Peoples and cultural identity, cost of living and public finances, justice and foreign policy, and health care and the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Quebecers like to create surprises and waves. If Erin O’Toole were to manage to keep his strong support in the ROC, Quebecers could reflexively want to be part of it. The person the most nervous about that scenario is the Bloc’s Yves-François Blancht because it’s his seats that will be in play.

“Debates are always important; in this ultra-rapid, lacklustre campaign, they will be crucial. Stay tuned.”

Read the full column by Tom Mulcair , a former provincial Liberal minister in Quebec who went on to lead the federal NDP.

5:45 p.m.

Opinion: With two weeks to go, can Justin Trudeau reverse the slide?

“For the past 10 days, the Tories have been trending upwards, the Liberals, dropping down. If this pattern holds until election day, it could push the Conservatives over the top, if not to the 170 seats needed for a majority, then to a solid minority position.

“Still, there are clouds on O’Toole’s horizon. A consummate campaigner, Trudeau will not go down without a fight, and there are still plenty of fights to be had. The trifecta of guns, germs and steel ould threaten to reverse the Tory trend.”

Read Tasha Kheiriddin’s latest column.

5:45 p.m.

Opinion: Trudeau will have to do better in Round 2 of debates

“It seems clear Trudeau faces an uphill battle and might need to land nothing less than a knockout blow in the remaining debates or this bout might be over.”

Read the latest column by Robert Libman , who has served as Equality Party leader and MNA and as mayor of Côte-St-Luc.

5:30 p.m.

Election campaign kicked off with good vibes between Trudeau and Legault

One desperately wants to win more seats in Quebec.

The other is the most popular politician in the province, with approval ratings holding steady even after the peak of the pandemic.

With Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s decision to call a Sept. 20 general election despite a fourth wave of COVID-19, Quebec voters – and nationalists in particular – will be a big part of his bid to form the majority government that eluded him in 2019.

And Premier François Legault — who sits on top of many of those nationalist votes that all the federal parties will be vying for over the 36-day campaign — is part of Trudeau’s equation.

Read our full story, by Philip Authier.

5:30 p.m.

Quebec Premier François Legault has a federal election shopping list

In making public what has become a tradition for Quebec premiers — a shopping list of demands in federal election campaigns — Premier François Legault last week resumed his quest to increase the federal share of health care funding in Quebec from 22 per cent to 35 per cent.

Read our full story, by Philip Authier.

5:30 p.m.

Sept. 20 is election day, with advance polls set to open Friday – here’s how to vote

Elections Canada, an independent agency that organizes federal elections, is assuring voters that they will be able to vote safely in the midst of the fourth wave of COVID-19.

The Montreal Gazette has put together a guide to voting in the election .

Here are some key links from Elections Canada:

  • Find your electoral district to learn where to vote and the names of local candidates.
  • Health and safety measures have been put in place.
  • Voting by mail is an option, with applications due by Sept. 14.

ariga@postmedia.com

Missed the federal election French language debate? Here are the highlights .
From a heated moment between the Liberal and Bloc Quebecois leaders to a clash on the ban on assault-style weapons, here are the highlights from tonight's French language debate.Justin Trudeau, Jagmeet Singh, Erin O'Toole, Yves-Francois Blanchet and Annamie Paul duked it out on topics including climate, Indigenous Peoples and cultural identity, cost of living and public finances, justice and foreign policy, and health care and the COVID-19 pandemic.

usr: 0
This is interesting!