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Canada Jody Wilson-Raybould says new book is not her ‘moment of revenge’ against Trudeau

04:25  15 september  2021
04:25  15 september  2021 Source:   globalnews.ca

'I wish I had never met you,' Wilson-Raybould told Trudeau, she reveals in her new book

  'I wish I had never met you,' Wilson-Raybould told Trudeau, she reveals in her new book On the day Prime Minister Justin Trudeau formally removed Jody Wilson-Raybould as justice minister and attorney general, she approached her successor at the cabinet swearing-in ceremony to deliver a cryptic warning. First, she congratulated David Lametti on his new role and offered her assistance in the transition. “Then, purposefully, with (Privy Council Clerk) Michael Wernick standing within earshot, I offered Lametti a warning: ‘Be careful, all is not what it seems,'” Wilson-Raybould writes in her new book, Indian in the Cabinet. “I looked directly at the clerk when I said it. Lametti replied, ‘Noted’.

Wilson - Raybould says she 's mad at herself now for having once thought Trudeau is an 'honest and good person, when, in truth, he would so casually lie to the public'. Author of the article: Brian Platt. “Then, purposefully, with (Privy Council Clerk) Michael Wernick standing within earshot, I offered Lametti a warning: ‘Be careful, all is not what it seems,'” Wilson - Raybould writes in her new book , Indian in the Cabinet. “I looked directly at the clerk when I said it. Lametti replied, ‘Noted’.”

Jody Wilson - Raybould PC QC MP (born March 23, 1971), also known by her initials JWR and by her Kwak’wala name Puglaas, is a Canadian lawyer and politician who has served as the member of

Jody Wilson-Raybould talking on a cell phone: Jody Wilson-Raybould appears at the House of Commons Justice Committee on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019. © THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick Jody Wilson-Raybould appears at the House of Commons Justice Committee on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019.

Former Liberal justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould says the release of a new book that details her final controversial days in the Trudeau government ahead of next week's federal election was not timed to exact revenge on the prime minister.

Wilson-Raybould, who served as Canada’s first Indigenous justice minister and attorney general, made the comments in an exclusive interview with Global News’ Dawn Friesen on Tuesday.

She resigned from Trudeau’s cabinet in early 2019 following a clash over how a potential criminal case against Quebec engineering giant SNC-Lavalin should be handled.

‘I did not want her to lie’: Trudeau rejects Wilson-Raybould’s claims about SNC-Lavalin talk

  ‘I did not want her to lie’: Trudeau rejects Wilson-Raybould’s claims about SNC-Lavalin talk "I knew what he was really asking. What he was saying. In that moment, I knew he wanted me to lie – to attest that what had occurred had not occurred," Wilson-Raybould said.In the book, Wilson-Raybould describes conversations she had with Trudeau about what would later become publicly known as the SNC-Lavalin affair.

Wilson - Raybould said that during those conversations, Trudeau was pushing her to lie about how his team had handled the situation. “I knew what he was really asking. Me – lie to protect a Crown government acting badly; a political party; a leader who was not taking responsibility. He must be delusional,” she wrote. Trudeau was pressed repeatedly on the excerpt on Saturday. As reporters grilled him about the details of Wilson - Raybould ’s claims, he called the situation “unfortunate.”

When asked about former Liberal cabinet member Jody Wilson - Raybould 's description of Justin Trudeau in her new book , wherein she claimed he asked her to lie amid what she called a pressure campaign to interfere in a criminal prosecution during the SNC-Lavalin scandal, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said on Saturday her allegations are “ not surprising.” Singh added he believes her .

Read more: ‘I did not want her to lie’: Trudeau rejects Wilson-Raybould’s claims about SNC-Lavalin talk

In a political memoir titled 'Indian in the Cabinet: Speaking Truth to Power', published Tuesday, Wilson-Raybould alleges Justin Trudeau wanted her to lie to Canadians about what had happened, writing, “This man was not the leader I thought him to be."

“It's not my moment of revenge,” Wilson-Raybould told Friesen about publishing the book just days before the Sept. 20 election, in which Trudeau is seeking a third term in office.

She said she had announced her publication date well before the snap election was called by the Liberal leader last month.

“I feel that my experiences in government and relaying those experiences and the lessons that I've learned are important to tell," she said. "I wanted to tell them.”

COMMENTARY: Trudeau deserved Jody Wilson-Raybould’s revenge

  COMMENTARY: Trudeau deserved Jody Wilson-Raybould’s revenge TV star Katie Price has ended her romance with Carl Woods, according to a report.

In her new book , Indian in the Cabinet, Jody Wilson - Raybould describes how the early honeymoon days as part of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau 's cabinet deteriorated over time as the Prime Minister's Office started to increasingly try to control the actions of her and other cabinet ministers. Wilson - Raybould does not offer any evidence to back up her assertion or say how she knows the RCMP was still looking into the government's actions in January. The RCMP has been tightlipped in the past about whether it has launched an investigation into possible obstruction of justice charges for

Wilson - Raybould says she was pushing for transparency with Canadians — and some level of accountability. "He used the line that would later become public, that I had 'experienced things differently,'" she writes. Wilson - Raybould resigned from the cabinet the next day and was followed out the door by then-health minister Jane Philpott before the two were booted from the Liberal caucus. The affair later led to the resignation of Trudeau 's principal secretary, Gerald Butts, and Privy Council clerk Michael Wernick.

In the book, Wilson-Raybould describes conversations she had with Trudeau about what would later become publicly known as the SNC-Lavalin affair.

During a press conference on Saturday, Trudeau rejected the claims made by Wilson-Raybould in the book about wanting her to lie.

“I did not want her to lie. I would never do that. I would never ask her that,” he said. “That is simply not true.”

In August 2019, a federal ethics commissioner report concluded that Trudeau had violated conflict of interest rules by attempting to interfere in the corruption case against SNC-Lavalin.

The firm had been charged with corruption over its dealings with the Libyan government but, citing the importance of saving jobs, the government starting exploring the possibility of striking a deal — a deferred prosecution agreement. Wilson-Raybould, who was serving as justice minister at the time, was opposed to the deal.

Trudeau says he has not been contacted by RCMP on SNC-Lavalin

  Trudeau says he has not been contacted by RCMP on SNC-Lavalin Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau says he has not been contacted by RCMP regarding SNC-Lavalin, after Jody Wilson-Raybould alleged the police force was still considering whether to investigate his government.Trudeau was responding to statements made by former cabinet minister Jody Wilson-Raybould, who in her new book says that, as recently as January 2021, the RCMP was still considering whether to investigate Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government in the matter. She did not offer evidence to back up that assertion.

Wilson - Raybould , 50, dismissed a suggestion she was seeking revenge , noting the publication date had been announced months before Trudeau called the election in August. Wilson - Raybould became the first indigenous person to be named justice minister when Trudeau appointed her in 2015, part of a stated commitment to improve the lives of the largely marginalized and impoverished aboriginal population. But she said that over the years it became clear to her that Trudeau would not be living up to commitments on matters such as indigenous affairs and the need for electoral reform.

Jody Wilson - Raybould and some friends cheerfully return from the book shops in this Saturday photo. Article content. Throughout Election 44 we are publishing this special daily edition of First Reading, our politics newsletter, to keep you posted on the ins and outs (and way outs) of the campaign. Campaigning against conservatives used to be easy in Canada: You’d find a candidate with some heterodox views on abortion or climate change and then, bingo, the whole party is on the defence for the better part of a week. But Chris Selley notes that Erin O’Toole is not like the other Conservative

Read more: COMMENTARY: Trudeau deserved Jody Wilson-Raybould’s revenge

“I had not realized until being in the centre of perceived power in government as a cabinet minister, how deeply entrenched partisanship is,” Wilson-Raybould told Global News.

“The hyper nature of partisanship and the blind loyalty that I experienced is corrosive,” she said.

Despite that, Wilson-Raybould says she did not regret the time she spent in federal politics.

Video: One-on-one with Jody Wilson-Raybould on launch of bombshell new book

In 2015, Wilson-Raybould became Canada’s first Indigenous justice minister and attorney general—- a feat she said she is still “incredibly proud” of.

After being ousted by the Liberal party in April 2019, Wilson-Raybould ran as an Independent candidate for Vancouver-Granville in the last federal election. She became the first woman to be elected as an Independent member of the Canadian Parliament.

Earlier in July, Wilson-Raybould announced she will not seek re-election and will instead shift her focus to working outside of federal politics to create change for Indigenous people.

Trudeau says he did not want Wilson-Raybould to lie as SNC-Lavalin affair re-emerges

  Trudeau says he did not want Wilson-Raybould to lie as SNC-Lavalin affair re-emerges OTTAWA — Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau denied wanting Jody Wilson-Raybould to lie as the SNC-Lavalin affair — which figured prominently in the last election — burst back onto the campaign trail Saturday with the publication of an excerpt of the former justice minister's memoir. The excerpt from the tell-all book "Indian in the Cabinet" — published in the Globe and Mail — came as the NDP revealed the cost of platform over the next five years, and police in London, Ont., charged a man in connection with a gravel throwing incident against Trudeau.

Speaking about her personal experience as an Indigenous woman in the cabinet, she told Global News she has faced discrimination and racism throughout her life and career.

“I know that this is an experience that many women and individuals have in their work lives and it highlights for me how much we still have to do to ensure that all voices are heard, to eliminate systemic problems and discrimination — implicit or otherwise bias in our systems of government," she said.

Video: Crown-Indigenous Minister Bennett apologizes for ‘racist’ text to Wilson-Raybould

By retelling her story in her book, the 50-year-old is hopeful other Canadians can learn some lessons.

“I would say to any young Indigenous person, young or old, to any Canadian, that your voice matters and to get involved in politics," she said.

With at least 75 candidates, a record number of Indigenous people are running in the federal election this year compared to 62 in 2019. Wilson-Raybould said there is more work to be done.

“We still have a long way to go to ensure that we're not just saying we have diversity, for example, within our political party .… but we actually have to act on that diversity and listen to those diverse voices,” she said.

“I'm going to continue to exercise my voice. And I hope other people do as well.”

Video: Trudeau to blame for lack of “transformative change” on Indigenous file: Wilson-Raybould

-- with files from the Canadian Press

Former Liberal MP Celina Caesar-Chavannes throws support behind Tory candidate in election .
'I would say that in this particular instance, in 2021, I don't mind voting for Maleeha Shahid, who is a Conservative,' the former Liberal MP said of the federal election.Speaking in an interview with The West Block’s Mercedes Stephenson, Caesar-Chavannes -- who left the Liberal caucus to sit as an independent in March 2019 -- said she plans to vote for Conservative candidate Maleeha Shahid in the Whitby, Ont., riding she once represented as a Liberal.

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This is interesting!