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Canada FIRST READING: The trans Tory everyone is ignoring, Wilson-Raybould's book makes waves

20:42  15 september  2021
20:42  15 september  2021 Source:   nationalpost.com

'I wish I had never met you,' Wilson-Raybould told Trudeau, she reveals in her new book

  'I wish I had never met you,' Wilson-Raybould told Trudeau, she reveals in her new book On the day Prime Minister Justin Trudeau formally removed Jody Wilson-Raybould as justice minister and attorney general, she approached her successor at the cabinet swearing-in ceremony to deliver a cryptic warning. First, she congratulated David Lametti on his new role and offered her assistance in the transition. “Then, purposefully, with (Privy Council Clerk) Michael Wernick standing within earshot, I offered Lametti a warning: ‘Be careful, all is not what it seems,'” Wilson-Raybould writes in her new book, Indian in the Cabinet. “I looked directly at the clerk when I said it. Lametti replied, ‘Noted’.

Throughout Election 44 we are publishing this special daily edition of First Reading, our politics newsletter, to keep you posted on the ins and outs (and way outs) of the campaign. To get an early version sent direct to your inbox every weekday at 6 p.m. ET, sign up here.

a man wearing a suit and tie: Norway just had an election too! Here, Labour leader Jonas Gahr Store (think of him like a more pro-oil version of NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh) holds a bouquet of roses after defeating the country's incumbent Conservative Party. © Provided by National Post Norway just had an election too! Here, Labour leader Jonas Gahr Store (think of him like a more pro-oil version of NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh) holds a bouquet of roses after defeating the country's incumbent Conservative Party.

TOP STORIES

Today is the last day to apply to vote by mail . Despite what you may have heard, Elections Canada isn’t handing out vote-by-mail packages willy-nilly , and you usually have to have a good reason to apply for one. Interestingly, six of the top 10 Canadians ridings for vote-by-mail applications are on Vancouver Island .

20 movies that fans think are better than the books

  20 movies that fans think are better than the books When it comes to movies based on books, avid and casual readers alike will often agree that the book is almost always slightly better. Perhaps it's because books go into more detail or because the images your mind creates are bound only by your imagination. In some cases, however, fans are adamant that the movie trumps the book. They may even recommend skipping the read altogether and going straight for the film.

The National Post has gotten ahold of a review copy of Jody Wilson-Raybould’s new book, Indian in the Cabinet. The book has no new material revelations about the Trudeau government’s handling of the SNC Lavalin scandal, but it does reveal lots of Wilson-Raybould’s unbridled bitterness towards the whole business . Most notable is when Wilson-Raybould writes of a private meeting where she told Trudeau “ I wish that I had never met you, ” and that she was still mad at herself for having believed that the Liberal Leader was an “honest and good person.”

For those missing the reference, the title of Wilson-Raybould’s book is based on the 1980 children’s book The Indian in the Cupboard . The book was about toy figures coming to life, not Canadian federal politics, but in a country where political memoirs typically carry names like Hell or High Water and Straight from the Heart, I think we can all agree that this one takes the cake.

COMMENTARY: Trudeau deserved Jody Wilson-Raybould’s revenge

  COMMENTARY: Trudeau deserved Jody Wilson-Raybould’s revenge Only the most fanatical Justin Trudeau partisans will begrudge Jody Wilson-Raybould for her moment of revenge. © THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau reacts to a question regarding former Liberal cabinet minister Jody Wilson-Raybould as he makes a campaign stop in Mississauga, Ont., Saturday, Sept. 11, 2021. Reading the first excerpt of her book, I did find myself occasionally cocking an eyebrow at the portrayal of a wide-eyed innocent who somehow awoke to find herself in a den of partisan thieves.

a close up of a sign:  This is some weak title right here. This is some weak title right here.

I’m afraid we have bone-chilling news for everyone: It’s now looking like Election 44 will be decided by a handful of ridings in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal . So if you’re not within walking distance of a Metro/Subway/SkyTrain stop, these last campaign days may rapidly be losing relevance for your particular situation.

Chris Selley, who is following the Conservative campaign, noticed that Erin O’Toole is now doing something that he’s generally avoided all election: Personally attacking Justin Trudeau . “Every Canadian has met a Justin Trudeau in their lives; privileged, entitled and always looking out for number one,” O’Toole said at a recent campaign stop .

You may not have noticed that the Conservatives are running their first-ever transgender candidate this election . Hannah Hodson is the Conservative candidate for Victoria. Hodson’s actively trying not to make a big deal out of her LGBT status (her deal is more affordable housing and effective addictions treatment), but National Post columnist Adam Zivo has thoughts on why CBC is actively trumpeting every other trans first except this one.

Corbella: Jody Wilson-Raybould's book about Trudeau paints an ugly portrait of our PM

  Corbella: Jody Wilson-Raybould's book about Trudeau paints an ugly portrait of our PM I’m reluctantly tearing myself away from Jody Wilson-Raybould’s new book, Indian in the Cabinet: Speaking Truth to Power, to write this column. It’s a page-turner — well written and well paced and an excellent reminder of just how morally bankrupt the federal Liberal government is, with particular emphasis on Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau. When she writes about first meeting Trudeau as he was wooing her to run for the federal Liberals in advance of the 2015 federal election that swept his party to power, she says: “I liked him. Yes, he was a smooth talker, but at that time it did not come across as an act.

Climate scientist Andrew Weaver was briefly leader of the B.C. Green Party before he abruptly decided to dynamite the party’s electoral chances by quitting and endorsing the B.C. NDP in 2020 (Canadian Green Parties have since made it a tradition to self-immolate only days before an election). Today, Weaver officially endorsed the Liberals at a B.C. campaign stop .

In January, Toronto NDP candidate Sidney Coles was posting about how missing vaccine doses in the United States were likely the result of a Zionist plot to send them to Israel . The Friends of the Simon Wiesenthal Centre for Holocaust Studies took notice, and Coles apologized this week for perpetuating what she called a “common antisemitic trope.”

FIRST READING: The revenge of Jody Wilson-Raybould

  FIRST READING: The revenge of Jody Wilson-Raybould Throughout Election 44 we are publishing this special daily edition of First Reading, our politics newsletter, to keep you posted on the ins and outs (and way outs) of the campaign. To get an early version sent direct to your inbox every weekday at 6 p.m. ET, sign up here. TOP STORIES Police have charged the guy who allegedly threw stones at Trudeau in London, Ont. , and he’s a local People’s Party of Canada organizer (although the PPC have since fired him). Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau would probably prefer that his former justice minister not release her tell-all book about him only four days before Election Day.

By stepping down as a candidate over sexual harassment allegations, Liberal incumbent Raj Saini will get a $92,900 severance cheque . While Saini narrowly missed out on his chance for a lifelong pension (for that you need to be in office at least six years), his payout is not atypical; every MP who retires or loses re-election can expect at least $100k .

As the Conservative campaign goes on the attack, here’s a 2003 story in which O’Toole’s father John – then a Progressive Conservative MPP in Ontario – expresses his opposition to going negative. “ I would think that we should deal with the issues and leave the name-calling behind ,” the elder O’Toole said during Ontario’s 2003 election.

( The above story also confirms that the leader of every major party right now has at least one close relative in electoral politics . Trudeau’s father and grandfather were MPs. Jagmeet Singh’s brother Gurratan is an Ontario MPP.)

Liberals face loss of progressive votes in bid for Vancouver-Granville, expert says

  Liberals face loss of progressive votes in bid for Vancouver-Granville, expert says VANCOUVER — Jody Wilson-Raybould has one piece of advice to give her political successor in the Vancouver Granville riding: follow your own path, and don't reward their political party with blind loyalty. Wilson-Raybould, who was Canada's first Indigenous minister of justice before being re-elected as an Independent, said she learned the downside of the hyper-partisan nature of politics and how quickly it can become toxic for candidates. "IWilson-Raybould, who was Canada's first Indigenous minister of justice before being re-elected as an Independent, said she learned the downside of the hyper-partisan nature of politics and how quickly it can become toxic for candidates.

Al Jazeera is a news agency fully funded by Qatar, an autocratic Middle Eastern state where elections are largely symbolic and a hereditary emir appoints the cabinet and judiciary. Anyways, their Toronto columnist thinks our actually democratic election is “ pedestrian .”

SOLID TAKES

After Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau claimed that the NDP can’t tax the wealthy with “unlimited zeal,” NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh shot back with “ just watch me .” Cliché or not, Sabrina Maddeaux brings out some stats to note that the Liberal government does have a habit of providing measurable support to Canada’s wealthiest at the expense of the middle class .

Postmedia’s resident disaffected Liberal Warren Kinsella drew up all the ways that he thinks the Liberals took a hit in the past week . One you may have missed: The Liberal government provided up to $125 million in subsidies to California-based Tesla Motors.

We’ve previously noted how Canada’s national moment over Indigenous reconciliation vanished the moment an election started. Well, Melissa Mbarki is here to criticize the Liberals for talking a big game about Indigenous issues while hobbling the one industry that disproportionately hires Indigenous people in spades : Oil and gas.

ELECTION INSIGHTS

For the rest of Election 44, the National Post will be sharing insights from Polly, an artificial intelligence engine developed at the University of Ottawa that correctly predicted the results of the 2019 election.

Canadian voters are really, really incensed by all the protests demonstrating against COVID-19 strictures. Over the weekend, Polly noted that became the single most talked-about election issue on Canadian social media since Afghanistan. But while this was previously an issue that played to the Liberals’ favour (especially when said protesters were chucking rocks at Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau), of late it’s mostly resulted in thousands of Canadians being angry without being entirely sure whether it should influence their behaviour on the ballot .

What British Columbians need to know about the federal election

  What British Columbians need to know about the federal election The federal election is on Monday, Sept. 20. If you live in British Columbia, here's what you need to know as you head to the polls. Why is there a federal election happening right now? This is the second time British Columbians are heading to the polls during the pandemic — after a provincial election on Oct. 24, 2020 — and a lot of people aren't too happy about it. According to a Nanos poll, three out of four Canadians don't believe a federal election should be happening in the middle of the fourth wave.

LET’S POLL

Virtually every pollster is seeing a major spike for the Bloc Québécois . According to pollster Philippe J. Fournier, it seems to be a direct fallout from the English-language debate, when Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet faced a barrage of questions implying that Quebec was racist and “discriminatory” in its policies covering language and religious garb. To those who think it’s unlikely that a whole province would switch their votes based on a perceived insult to regional pride, you may not be familiar with Quebec.

Get all of these insights and more into your inbox every weekday at 6 p.m. ET by signing up for the First Reading newsletter here.

From now until the bitter end of Election 44, the National Post is publishing a special daily edition of First Reading, our politics newsletter, to keep you posted on the ins and outs (and way outs) of the campaign. All curated by the National Post’s own Tristin Hopper and published Monday to Friday at 6 p.m. and Sundays at 9 a.m. Sign up here.

‘Slap in the face’: Trans voters say they’re still seeing ‘deadnames’ on voter cards .
Despite the issue coming to light in 2019 and previous elections, many trans and non-binary Canadians maintain they've done the legwork to getting an incorrectly named voter card.Faelan Quinn, of Ottawa, Ont. is one of those Canadians. Their maroon-and-white-coloured card showed up Wednesday. To their disappointment, it displayed a name they legally changed more than four years prior.

usr: 1
This is interesting!