•   
  •   
  •   

Canada Possible Huawei ban has telecoms asking Liberals about taxpayer compensation for new equipment

14:26  26 november  2021
14:26  26 november  2021 Source:   nationalpost.com

Tax agency employee suspended after taking complaint outside 'chain of command'

  Tax agency employee suspended after taking complaint outside 'chain of command' A former Canada Revenue Agency research and technology advisor was suspended twice for insubordination for going outside the CRA's "chain of command" by raising his concerns about "incompetent" employees wasting taxpayer money directly with the agency's former commissioner.That's why the former Canada Revenue Agency research and technology advisor said he wrote directly to the agency's head to raise flags about what he saw as a waste of taxpayer dollars caused by "incompetent CRA employees.

The cost to Bell and Telus for removing Huawei equipment is unclear, but early estimates put the figure at up to $1 billion for Telus. © Provided by National Post The cost to Bell and Telus for removing Huawei equipment is unclear, but early estimates put the figure at up to $1 billion for Telus.

Both Bell and Telus have approached the federal government over the possibility of being compensated by taxpayers, should they have to remove Huawei equipment from their networks, sources have told National Post. The two telecom companies could find themselves forced to replace the equipment if the Liberals end up banning the Chinese telecom equipment-maker from Canada’s 5G networks.

The Liberal government has been mulling a ban on Huawei for three years over security concerns. With uncertainty over government plans, Canadian wireless providers have been building their 5G networks using equipment from other vendors. But both Bell and Telus have previously installed Huawei equipment to serve their existing older-generation networks, and it would have to be removed if the ban is retroactive.

45 Richest Child Stars of All Time

  45 Richest Child Stars of All Time Not all famous child actors are able to hold onto the success they achieve early in life, but some go on to pursue long-lasting careers -- and accumulate sizable sums of money while doing so. Related:

A government source said officials told one of the telecoms that, since cabinet hasn’t yet made a final decision on a ban, it is the government’s position that it is too early to begin any formal conversations about compensation. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Innovation Minister François-Philippe Champagne have indicated that an announcement on the ban would come within weeks.

Champagne also told The Canadian Press earlier this month that Canada would only move forward with “trusted partners” when it came to future  initiatives that involved artificial-intelligence technologies.

Experts have said Canada has no choice but to go ahead with a ban, given that our allies in the Five Eyes intelligence network — the U.S., Australia, New Zealand and the U.K. — have all banned or restricted Huawei equipment. The concern is that Huawei’s links to Beijing make it a security risk, particularly considering China’s laws that require Chinese companies to co-operate with its intelligence services.

Liberals introduce bill with targeted pandemic aid for businesses, workers

  Liberals introduce bill with targeted pandemic aid for businesses, workers OTTAWA — The Trudeau Liberals have outlined their latest aid package for an economy recovering from COVID-19, proposing targeted support to severely affected businesses, locked-down workers, and extra weeks of benefits that expired just days ago. The legislation introduced Wednesday in the House of Commons is one of four bills the government wants MPs to pass before the middle of December ahead of a scheduled winter break. The Liberals are proposing to send $300 per week to workers who find themselves off the job because of a "COVID-19-related public health lockdown in their region" between now and spring 2022. Those payments would be retroactive to Oct.

The U.S. Secretary of Commerce, Gina Raimondo, has said that she views Huawei as a national-security threat to the U.S. and its allies, and that the Biden administration intends to “work with allies to secure their telecommunications networks” to expand the use of “trusted U.S. and allied companies” in telecom.

Carleton University international affairs professor Fen Hampson said that British companies, especially smaller telecoms, are being compensated for costs incurred due to restrictions on Huawei equipment, and the U.K. government has also given enough time for those companies to phase out the hardware or find other suppliers.

He noted that given the dominance in Canada of the Big Three wireless providers — Bell, Telus and Rogers — there will be less “public sympathy for a public bailout of these companies by Canadian consumers” who pay some of the highest fees in the world for wireless services.

Complaints over denied compensation for flight delays still unresolved following lengthy inquiry

  Complaints over denied compensation for flight delays still unresolved following lengthy inquiry Nearly two years after launching an inquiry into thousands of complaints from airline passengers claiming they were wrongly denied compensation for delayed flights, the Canadian Transportation Agency has issued a decision.However, affected passengers must still wait for a resolution.

“In the end though, Canadian taxpayers will be stuck with the bill. And the question is how much.” he said.

The cost to Bell and Telus for removing equipment is unclear. Early estimates put the figure at up to $1 billion for Telus. But because equipment is generally replaced over time anyway, that figure may be getting lower. In 2019, Telus told the government that replacing all of its equipment following a full ban on Huawei would be “an expensive and complex proposition over an elongated timeframe.”

Neither company responded to a request for comment, or questions about how much it would cost to replace Huawei equipment in the existing networks.

Bell and Telus aren’t the only companies who stand to be affected by a ban. Samer Bishay, CEO of smaller player Iristel, which has partnered with Huawei on 3G and 4G networks in Northern Canada, told the National Post in an earlier interview a requirement to rip out existing equipment would be “catastrophic.”

Taxpayers should not have to 'subsidize' rich telecoms that chose Huawei, Conservatives say .
The Conservatives are urging the Liberal government not to spend public money to compensate Canada’s large telecom companies for choosing to use Huawei equipment if it goes ahead with a Huawei 5G ban. “We ask that your government categorically reject requests for compensation from Canada’s large telecommunications companies,” Conservative Public Safety critic Raquel Dancho said in a letter sent Friday to Public Safety Minister Marco Mendocino and Innovation Minister François-Philippe Champagne.

usr: 3
This is interesting!