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Canada O'Toole says Canada-U.S. relations have never been worse

23:08  11 january  2022
23:08  11 january  2022 Source:   cbc.ca

O'Toole says he opposes Quebec's plan to 'tax and target' the unvaccinated

  O'Toole says he opposes Quebec's plan to 'tax and target' the unvaccinated OTTAWA — Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole says while he respects provincial jurisdiction, he opposes Quebec's plan "to tax and target" those who are unvaccinated against COVID-19. The Tory leader made his position known on Premier François Legault's proposal during a Facebook Liveevent late Thursday. Some of his MPs had already taken to social media to condemn the proposal as discriminatory, unethical and punishing to low-income earners. EarlierThe Tory leader made his position known on Premier François Legault's proposal during a Facebook Liveevent late Thursday. Some of his MPs had already taken to social media to condemn the proposal as discriminatory, unethical and punishing to low-income earners.

O ' Toole said Canada shouldn't be intimidated by such threats. " Canada should work very closely with our Five Eyes allies so that it' s difficult for China to use its immense economic size to intimidate smaller economies like Canada ," O ' Toole said , citing the intelligence-sharing alliance between Australia, Canada , New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the U . S . "We may be a smaller economy in comparison with China but we are a giant when it comes to the rights we hold dear, human rights, the rule of law and the security of our citizens." O ' Toole said Canada must strengthen its relationship

O ' Toole said the party will be relegated to the opposition benches indefinitely if it continues to run up lopsided victories in Western Canada and rural areas while underperforming in the country' s big cities. The Montreal-born, Bowmanville, Ont.-raised O ' Toole said Conservatives must embrace policies that will appeal to the suburban voters who have abandoned the party since the 2011 election O ' Toole said the party must do more than shift its policy positions — it must also do whatever it can to welcome Canadians of all racial and ethnic backgrounds, and members of the LGBTQ community, into the fold.

Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole said today the Canada-U.S. relationship is at its lowest point in decades — a development that threatens to stall Canada's growth and derail some sectors of the economy.

Speaking at a virtual event with Nova Scotia chambers of commerce, O'Toole said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has done little to stop the U.S. from pursuing punitive policies. O'Toole pointed to a list of grievances, including recent hikes to softwood lumber tariffs and an ongoing dispute over P.E.I. potatoes.

In November, the U.S. Department of Commerce doubled the amount of duty it imposes on softwood lumber coming from Canada — a significant escalation in the years-long fight over this issue. Washington claims Canadian producers dump their product in the U.S. at subsidized prices, undercutting their American counterparts.

Kelly McParland: It's not about Covid. It's about health care, and Erin O'Toole should maybe take advantage

  Kelly McParland: It's not about Covid. It's about health care, and Erin O'Toole should maybe take advantage The federal Conservative party needs an issue it can use to differentiate itself from the Liberals, appeal to Canadians and confirm itself as a serious alternative government with sound ideas and attractive policies. Hmmmm, let’s see. Whatever could it turn to? What’s going on out there in winterland that might hold a strong appeal to a broad mass of voters? (Scratches head. Thinks real hard …) OK, here’s a hint: HEALTH CARE! (Was that subtle enough?) A memo must have circulated within the Ottawa pundit club, as suddenly there’s a rash of articles noticing that things aren’t as they should be in the venerated Canadian health-care system, which, until recently, we insistently a

O ' Toole said Trudeau and his team are unfairly targeting what he described as "the cleanest, most ethical, most environmentally conscious and most Indigenous-engaged energy sector in the world." He said Trudeau has been "shockingly silent" about environmental activist David Suzuki' s controversial warning that "pipelines will be Trudeau is leading an "ideological cabinet that is focused on shutting down industries and stopping investment in our country at a time when Canada is drowning in debt and division," O ' Toole said , adding that Conservatives are "the only party standing up for Canadians ."

And the Canadian Conservatives are all in. The Conservatives knew this would fail which is worse than if they thought they had a chance. It means that their plan was to be able to go back to their base and say their attempts at stopping the right-to-choose was blocked by those dastardly Liberals and everyone should donate more to save the children. And the Conservatives MPs are all in despite what O ' toole says . Note he always says he' s pro-choice but almost never mentions the will of his party.

Last month, facing threats from the U.S., Canada voluntarily halted fresh potato exports from P.E.I. after a wart fungus was discovered at two of the province's farms.

And just last week, the U.S. Trade Representative's office claimed victory when Canada lost a fight over trade quotas for dairy products before a Canada-U.S.-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA) dispute panel.

Those trade losses follow U.S. President Joe Biden's earlier decision to cancel permits for the Keystone XL pipeline — a multi-billion dollar blow to Alberta's oilpatch. The Biden administration also has done little to stop Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, from trying to shut down Enbridge's Line 5 pipeline — a crucial artery that supplies oil products and natural gas to power huge portions of the Canadian economy.

Canada likely to get to place where provinces mull vaccine mandates: Duclos

  Canada likely to get to place where provinces mull vaccine mandates: Duclos OTTAWA — Canada's health minister says he expects the country to reach a time in the COVID-19 pandemic when provinces consider implementing a broader vaccine mandate to counter rising cases. Jean-Yves Duclos told a COVID-19 briefing on Friday that such a measure was not currently being contemplated in Canada, but his personal opinion was that the country would get there at some point. “We know that COVID-19 will be with us for many more months to come, maybe even many years,” he said in French.

Later in question period, O ' Toole said Canada has been badly outpaced by the U . S . in the number of doses administered. While 30 per cent of the U . S . population is now fully vaccinated, fewer than 3 per cent are in Canada — a disparity largely explained by the 16-week interval between first and second doses in this country. Americans are beginning to return to normal, O ' Toole said , while many Canadians are still living through lockdowns. The federal government' s failure to procure more vaccine supply in the first three months of this year has resulted in a "devastating third wave," O ' Toole said .

Erin Michael O ' Toole PC CD MP (born January 22, 1973) is a Canadian politician serving as Leader of the Official Opposition of Canada and the leader of the Conservative Party of Canada since August

"We have never seen, in modern Canadian history, Canada-U.S. relations at such a low point. We just lost a recent trade battle with respect to supply management — we've been losing on agriculture. We're losing on forestry products. There's been steel and aluminum tariffs and Buy America that has us losing on manufacturing," O'Toole said, pointing to a U.S. government policy to shift government procurement to American firms.

O'Toole said snarled Canada-U.S. supply chains also have resulted in higher consumer prices at home.

"Since the 1960s, Canada has had an integrated supply chain, particularly in manufacturing, with the U.S. and we should be restoring that relationship and making sure supply chain shortages — whether it's microchips or food — are solved on a Canada-U.S. basis," he said. "That would start easing off the pressure we're seeing with inflation."

While lamenting the state of bilateral relations, O'Toole cheered the apparent defeat of Biden's signature piece of domestic legislation, the Build Back Better Act.

Opinion: Canada and India must forge deeper partnerships to counter shared threats

  Opinion: Canada and India must forge deeper partnerships to counter shared threats Anita Anand and Mélanie Joly’s appointments as ministers of national defence and foreign affairs presents Prime Minister Justin Trudeau with an opportunity to define Canadian interests in the Indo-Pacific. Now is the time for Canada to enhance its strategic partnership with India. The world has fractured along fault lines of strategic competition. On one side is an authoritarian model backed by China’s Communist party; and on the other is the shared values and interests of great democracies like India and Canada. From two ends of the Pacific, our nations have a shared interest in contributing to the rise and prosperity of the Indo-Pacific region.

Later in question period, O ' Toole said Canada has been badly outpaced by the U . S . in the number of doses administered. While 30 per cent of the U . S . population is now fully vaccinated, fewer than 3 per cent are in Canada — a disparity largely explained by the 16-week interval between first and second doses in this country. "We are pleased to support municipalities across the province through our innovative Targeted Sector Support program," Government Relations Minister Don McMorris said in a release.

We are Canada ’ s general-theme subreddit. They why is the media pushing for one. Since O ' Toole has taken leadership of conservative party every media outlet has been talking about a fall election. Given that the NDP have said they will never work with the Conservatives, the Conservatives will be entirely unable to get the U . S . court sentences 11 men for plotting to smuggle guns into Canada .

That $1.9 trillion bill included a sizeable tax credit worth up to $12,500 US to buyers of new electric vehicles (EVs) — as long as those cars are manufactured by union workers in the United States. That credit had the potential to devastate the Canadian auto sector.

"Thankfully, the Build Back Better plan was held back by one U.S. senator," O'Toole said, referring to U.S. Senator Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia. "Mr. Biden's plan would have unfairly assisted electric vehicle manufacturing in the United States."

Before Manchin said he'd vote against the bill and the tax credits — the U.S. Senate is evenly split between Democrats and Republicans and his support was central to the bill's passage — the Canadian government vowed to take strong retaliatory action.

In a statement to CBC News, a spokesperson for International Trade Minister Mary Ng said the government "will take no lessons from Conservatives when it comes to defending Canadians interests."

"When we retaliated against unfair U.S. steel and aluminum tariffs, Conservatives urged us to stop fighting back. When we were negotiating for a better CUSMA deal, the Conservatives wanted Canada to capitulate to U.S. demands," Alice Hansen said.

Tasha Kheiriddin: The unvaccinated must be deterred from harming others

  Tasha Kheiriddin: The unvaccinated must be deterred from harming others What to do about the unvaccinated? As Omicron tears through Canadian society, this public health question has become a political wedge issue. The Liberals and Conservatives have chosen sides, ramped up the rhetoric, and polarized the debate, each playing to the base they think is most likely to support their point of view. With 88 per cent of Canadians over the age of 12 fully vaccinated , the Liberals figure they’re pretty safe siding with the crowd that favours the jab. Regrettably, they have chosen the strategy of demonization. This week, Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos called on provincial governments to consider forced vaccination .

"In a relationship as large and significant as the one we have with the United States, there will always be challenges. We have worked together and have resolved many of these in the past, and that work continues and we will continue to get it done."

On softwood lumber, Ng recently filed a challenge under CUSMA, the North American trade pact, against the new U.S. softwood lumber duties. Canadian and U.S. officials are also scheduled to meet this week to negotiate an end to the dispute over P.E.I. potatoes.

U.S. President Joe Biden, right, shakes hands with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as they meet in the Oval Office of the White House on Nov. 18, 2021, in Washington, D.C. © Evan Vucci/The Associated Press U.S. President Joe Biden, right, shakes hands with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as they meet in the Oval Office of the White House on Nov. 18, 2021, in Washington, D.C.

It's not the first time the opposition leader has lambasted Trudeau's handling of the bilateral relationship. At the North American Leaders' Summit in November, Biden said Canada was one his "easiest" relationships, a comment that prompted O'Toole to call Trudeau a "pushover" and remark that "a one-way street is quite easy."

"It is no wonder President Biden said that Canada under this prime minister is his 'easiest' relationship. It is easy for the U.S. to win under this government," O'Toole said in a December speech in the House of Commons.

"The current prime minister has led our country through the steepest decline in Canada-U.S. relations in the modern age over the course of three different administrations," O'Toole said in another November speech.

"It is easy for the U.S. to dominate, easy for the U.S. to win with the current prime minister and easy to ignore Canada under the current Liberal government."

Crush of provincial aid requests makes Omicron wave unique for federal response: LeBlanc .
Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc says that unlike in previous waves of COVID-19, simultaneous requests for federal help from several provinces have put added pressure on Ottawa's response.Unlike other waves, the record-breaking surge of cases this winter struck at much the same time across jurisdictions in Canada, "and many provinces, at the same time, are requesting more and more federal support," LeBlanc said in an interview on Rosemary Barton Live airing Sunday.

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