•   
  •   
  •   

Canada King Charles sends ‘profound sympathy’ to Atlantic Canadians impacted by Fiona

01:30  28 september  2022
01:30  28 september  2022 Source:   globalnews.ca

‘I felt like I was forgotten’: P.E.I. residents, farmers, fishers reeling in Fiona’s wake

  ‘I felt like I was forgotten’: P.E.I. residents, farmers, fishers reeling in Fiona’s wake Residents of P.E.I. are struggling with an ongoing lack of power and significant damage almost a week after hurricane Fiona hit Canada's East Coast. Joan Peters has spent the last six days living in the dark.

Britain's King Charles III sits at Westminster Hall, where both Houses of Parliament are meeting to express their condolences following the death of Queen Elizabeth II, at Westminster Hall, in London, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. © Henry Nicholls/Pool Photo via AP Britain's King Charles III sits at Westminster Hall, where both Houses of Parliament are meeting to express their condolences following the death of Queen Elizabeth II, at Westminster Hall, in London, Monday, Sept. 12, 2022.

King Charles III is sending his "profound sympathy" to those in Atlantic Canada who have been impacted by the devastation of storm Fiona, according to a message shared by Canadian Gov. Gen. Mary Simon on Tuesday.

“My wife and I were most concerned to hear of the appalling devastation caused by storm Fiona and particularly wanted to send our profound sympathy to the people of Atlantic Canada whose lives, livelihoods and properties have been so badly affected by this disaster," King Charles III said in the statement.

Feds move from ‘response’ to ‘recovery’ following Fiona

  Feds move from ‘response’ to ‘recovery’ following Fiona There are approximately 100 personnel per province available to assist Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador.“Time is of the essence and a speedy response is what’s required,” he said, during a press conference held by a number of federal ministers to provide an update on the storm.

Read more:

Post-Fiona recovery: Trudeau says stronger infrastructure needed after PEI visit

Read More

Post-Fiona recovery: Trudeau says stronger infrastructure needed after PEI visit

Post-tropical storm Fiona swept across Atlantic Canada over this past weekend, causing extensive damage to regions such as Nova Scotia’s eastern mainland, Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island and southwestern Newfoundland.

As of Tuesday afternoon, more than 200,000 Atlantic Canadian homes and businesses were still without electricity. More than 134,000 citizens in Nova Scotian and 71,000 in P.E.I are affected.

King Charles III said he has "fond memories" with Queen Consort Camilla of their recent visit to Atlantic Canada in May 2022, adding that they know that Atlantic Canadian's "resilience and sense of community will help you through these unbelievably difficult times."

N.S. to give Fiona update, premier to later announce provincial support plan

  N.S. to give Fiona update, premier to later announce provincial support plan The premier of Nova Scotia is set to make the supports announcement for those impacted by Fiona at 3 p.m. local time. It will be livestreamed on this page. Read more: Fiona: Nova Scotia premier tours ‘heartbreaking’ aftermath in Cape Breton The province’s request for federal financial aid and military support have both been approved on Sunday. The federal government announced earlier that members of the Canadian Armed Forces are being deployed to help with recovery efforts across the regional.

He shared his appreciation for first responders, the military and to community members who "are doing so much to support others during this extremely challenging period."

"Our thoughts and prayers are very much with all of you as you work to recover and rebuild,” said King Charles III.

— with files from Global News' Marc-André Cossette and The Canadian Press

Prime minister announces $300M recovery package for Atlantic Canada in wake of Fiona .
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced a $300-million recovery fund for Atlantic Canadians struggling with the damage cause of post-tropical storm Fiona. Many remain without power Ten days after Fiona blew through Nova Scotia, there are still thousands of Nova Scotia Power customers waiting for electricity and some who have no idea when it will come back on. Nova Scotia Premier Tim Houston says more than 20,000 residents are still without power in his province and that many won't have their electricity restored until the weekend.

usr: 0
This is interesting!