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Canada NewsAlert: Study links vets and suicide risk

22:54  07 december  2017
22:54  07 december  2017 Source:   msn.com

Facebook to expand artificial intelligence to help prevent suicide

  Facebook to expand artificial intelligence to help prevent suicide Facebook Inc will expand its pattern recognition software to other countries after successful tests in the U.S. to detect users with suicidal intent, the world's largest social media network said on Monday.Facebook began testing the software in the United States in March, when the company started scanning the text of Facebook posts and comments for phrases that could be signals of an impending suicide.

Deployed Veterans also had a lower risk of suicide compared to non-deployed Veterans . These findings are from a study that looked at the vital status of A recent study of Veterans serving during the Iraq and Afghanistan wars between 2001–2007 found that both deployed and non-deployed

Past research suggests a possible link between abnormally low cholesterol and suicide risk . However, Reuter wasn't expecting such a big difference with one subgroup of Vets in the study . When they were first seen at VA for a medical reason, these Veterans , part of the larger study group, had a

  NewsAlert: Study links vets and suicide risk © Provided by thecanadianpress.com

OTTAWA - A landmark new study from Veterans Affairs Canada appears to confirm what many have long feared: Canadians who have served in uniform are at greater risk of taking their own lives than members of the general public.

Researchers used nearly 40 years of data from Veterans Affairs, the Department of National Defence and Statistics Canada to review the records of more than 200,000 former service members.

The troubling study shows that male veterans were 1.4 times more at risk of suicide than men who had never served in the Canadian military, particularly in the case of younger men.

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A new study shows suicide risk goes up with quick, repeat deployments.Manjunath Kiran / AFP - Getty Images file. Soldiers are more at risk of suicide when they’re repeatedly deployed with six months or less between rotations, and when they’re sent to war too soon after they join the service

risk in Veterans . This study assessed only combat trauma, not a diagnosis of PTSD, as a factor in the suicidal behavior. Considerable debate exists about the reason for the heightened risk of suicide in trauma survivors. Whereas some studies suggest that suicide risk is higher among those who

The risk for female veterans was found to be even higher — 1.8 times greater than for women who hadn't served. Age was not a factor.

The study also shows that veterans have been at an increased risk of suicide, compared with the general population, over the past four decades.

The Veterans Affairs Canada study is the first of its kind, and comes amid a new government push to reduce the number of suicides and improve the mental health of current and former military members.

California advises against keeping your phone in your pocket .
The jury is still out on whether or not cellphone radiation is bad for you, but California's Department of Public Health isn't taking any chances. The advisory follows the release of CDPH findings from 2009, which were prompted by a lawsuit from UC Berkeley professor Joel Moskowitz in his bid to explore possible links between cellphone use and increased risks of cancer. He believes that cellphone radiation poses a "major risk." Other agencies, such as Connecticut's own Department of Public Health, have put out similar recommendations.

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