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Canada Removing Sir John A. Macdonald statue not the answer, says Native Council

07:20  10 august  2018
07:20  10 august  2018 Source:   cbc.ca

City of Victoria to remove statue of John A. Macdonald at city hall

  City of Victoria to remove statue of John A. Macdonald at city hall The City of Victoria is going to remove a statue of John A. MacDonald outside of Victoria city hall. Victoria city council will be asked to endorse the decision to have the statue removed on Aug. 11 and have a plaque installed in its place.In collaboration between the city and First Nations, the decision was made to have the plaque read: “In 2017, the City of Victoria began a journey of Truth and Reconciliation with the Lekwungen peoples, the Songhees and Esquimalt Nations, on whose territories the city stands.READ MORE: The controversy over Sir John A.

The mayor of Victoria says a statue of Prime Minister John A . Macdonald will be removed from the front entrance to city hall as a gesture of reconciliation with First Nations . In a blog post Wednesday

Sir John Macdonald was born in Scotland, his father, Hugh Macdonald , being a native of Sutherlandshire in the Highlands. Mr. Flanagan, then assistant city clerk, and the only one left of the Council or officers of that date, says John A . was the life of the Council , and always made the

a statue of a man: The city says it has no plans to remove the Sir John A. Macdonald park bench that draws the attention of tourists every year. © Brian Higgins/CBC The city says it has no plans to remove the Sir John A. Macdonald park bench that draws the attention of tourists every year.

Legions of tourists and Islanders alike have had their picture taken with Sir John A. Macdonald on his bench at the corner of Victoria Row and Queen Street over the years.

The City of Charlottetown says it has no plans to remove the statue, nor have they had any complaints, after the city of Victoria, B.C. decided to take down their Macdonald statue.

Jonathan Hamel, intergovernmental affairs coordinator for the Native Council of P.E.I., says Macdonald's legacy is complex and that there are better ways to achieve reconciliation.

Removing Statue Of 1st PM Reignites Fierce Debate In Victoria, B.C.

  Removing Statue Of 1st PM Reignites Fierce Debate In Victoria, B.C. The City of Victoria is set to remove a statue of John A. Macdonald from the steps of city hall on August 11. City Family's Witness Reconciliation Program — a group created last year to pursue issues of reconciliation with the Songhees and Esquimalt Nations — denounced the first prime minister of Canada as "a leader of violence against Indigenous peoples." In a lengthy statement on her website, Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps notes that a plaque will immediately replace the statue until all parties involved can "find a way to recontextualize Macdonald in an appropriate way." Until then, it will be stored in a city facility.© Provided by AOL Inc.

Sir John Alexander Macdonald (11 January 1815 – 6 June 1891) was the first Prime Minister of Canada (1867–1873, 1878–1891). The dominant figure of Canadian Confederation

READ MORE: Sir John A . Macdonald , notorious drinker, honoured with Kingston whisky tasting. Stanley agreed. “I am not particularly in favour of taking down his statue on Parliament Hill,” he said .

"A lot of the policies his government formed when Canada became a country [are] having a negative impact upon Canada's Indigenous population today," Hamel said.

'We can say, "this was not right"'

"We also realize that being a founding father of Canada and the fact that the idea of Canada was actually born here in Charlottetown, those are important things to remember and celebrate as well."

Hamel understands why some people want statues of Macdonald to be taken down, but said leaving them up still allows for conversations about Aboriginal history and action to ensure a better future.

"By removing it, we think that's diminishing, sometimes, what has happened. But if we allow it to stay there, we can address it. We can say, 'This was not right, we need to come together."

John A. Macdonald statue removed from Victoria City Hall to cheers and jeers

  John A. Macdonald statue removed from Victoria City Hall to cheers and jeers The statue of John A. Macdonald was removed from Victoria City Hall on Saturday to cheers and jeers from a small crowd who gathered to watch.As a small crowd of supporters and opponents looked on, City of Victoria crews used a truck and crane to remove a statue of Canada's first prime minster from in front of city hall on Saturday morning.

The group argued Macdonald ’s statue should not be taking up public space in Montreal, saying it would be better suited for a museum. WATCH BELOW: ‘No plans’ to remove Sir John A . Macdonald from schools: Trudeau.

As part of the city's ongoing reconciliation process with First Nations , the City of Victoria is planning to remove the Sir John A . Macdonald bronze statue from in front of City Hall this Saturday. The plan to remove the statue , which is expected to pass a city council vote on Thursday, follows year-long

Reconciliation a 'very complex idea'

It's a topic that requires a collaborative discussion and education on numerous fronts, Hamel said.

"Reconciliation is a very complex idea. How do we bring that about? It's not just saying we'll ... remove the reminders of our colonial past and that way we'll fix the problem. No, it has to be multi-faceted."

Housing and health-care issues are among the challenges Indigenous people face today, he said.

'We can make things different for our children'

The Native Council represents Aboriginal people living off-reserve, and Hamel said he'd like to see their perspective included in the conversation alongside status Indians, Inuit and Métis people.

a statue of a person: Some of Macdonald's policies in the country's early days are having 'a negative impact upon Canada's Indigenous population today,' says Jonathan Hamel. © Brian Higgins/CBC Some of Macdonald's policies in the country's early days are having 'a negative impact upon Canada's Indigenous population today,' says Jonathan Hamel.

Hamel said when people see Macdonald on his bench, they should "remember that yes, under his leadership, we did form a country here, but also remind ourselves that some of his policies were not that good, did not bring about the country we probably hoped it would." 

"Remind ourselves that together, now, today, we can make a change moving forward. We can make things different for our children today."


Montreal activists take aim at John A. Macdonald statue .
A group claiming responsibility for defacing the statue of Sir John A. Macdonald in Place du Canada is hoping the city of Montreal will remove the monument from the park.A statue of Sir John A. Macdonald located at Place du Canada in downtown Montreal was vandalized overnight.

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