•   
  •   
  •   

Canada Endangered orca gets antibiotic in U.S. waters

06:32  11 august  2018
06:32  11 august  2018 Source:   msn.com

Scientists can't help distraught orca holding dead calf — but they can try to keep it safe

  Scientists can't help distraught orca holding dead calf — but they can try to keep it safe For more than a week, a whale known as J-35 has been holding up its deceased calf, a process that requires tremendous energy from the mother. Orca observers have seen this behaviour before — but not for this long — and that has some scientists worried.The calf was born on July 24, but died shortly after it was born . Since then, the orca known as J-35 has been seen arching her back in order to push her dead offspring along the surface of the water with her forehead, or carrying the calf by clutching its tail in her mouth.

SEATTLE (AP) — Experts are preparing rare emergency efforts to administer antibiotics or feed live salmon to try to save a young emaciated orca that's part of a critically endangered pod of killer whales. Another female orca from the group that spends time in U . S . Northwest waters attracted

Experts are preparing rare emergency efforts to administer antibiotics or feed live salmon to try to save a young emaciated orca that's part of a critically endangered pod of killer whales. Another female orca from the group that spends time in U . S . Northwest waters attracted global attention as the

a person riding a wave on a surfboard in the water © Provided by thecanadianpress.com

VANCOUVER - Experts attempting an unprecedented rescue effort to save an endangered killer whale off the West Coast have managed to inject the young orca with antibiotics.

A team set out Thursday and found the young whale alone, said Vancouver Aquarium veterinarian Martin Haulena on a conference call with reporters Friday.

While he is part of the core veterinarian team trying to save the whale, it was the first time he'd seen the animal in person.

"It struck me very dramatically," he said. "So that first meeting with this incredibly skinny little whale that was by herself was quiet worrisome."

Killer whale that lost calf gets help from her pod

  Killer whale that lost calf gets help from her pod VICTORIA - A female killer whale that was seen pushing the body of its newborn calf after it died last week appears in good health and is getting help from members of her pod, says a whale scientist. Ken Balcomb, the senior whale scientist at Center For Whale Research in Washington state, said despite concerns the mother's state of grief could be affecting its health, the animal appears in good condition. Researchers and whale watchers have spotted the orca, known as J35, holding the calf above the water since July 24 as other members of the southern resident pod hover nearby."She's doing fine," Balcomb said Wednesday. "She's looking good.

The young female orca has sparked an international rescue effort by Canadian and American scientists who have developed a novel plan to feed her salmon medicated with antibiotics . J50 is one of only 75 Southern resident killer whales that swim the coastal waters between British Columbia to California.

attempting an unprecedented rescue effort to save an endangered killer whale off the West Coast have managed to inject the young orca with antibiotics . When the water calmed, the team was also able to get a sample from her blow hole, which he said they believe will be very valuable to assess.

The three-and-a-half-year-old orca known as J50 is one of 75 remaining southern resident killer whales that spend their summer foraging for salmon off the coasts of British Columbia and Washington state.

Experts have been watching the young whale lose weight since June and they took the novel action in an effort to prevent the loss of more reproductive potential within the population.

Sheila Thornton, lead killer whale research scientist at Fisheries and Oceans Canada, said they'll often see the southern residents with poor body conditions at the start of the summer, but they improve over the season as they feed on chinook salmon.

"I think that's one of the things that's most worrisome to me. Is that not only is she not improving, it looks like she's deteriorating over the period of time when we would expect to see the condition improve."

Whale sounds coax orca out of B.C. harbour

  Whale sounds coax orca out of B.C. harbour Whale sounds coax orca out of B.C. harbourDepartment of Fisheries and Oceans officials said the transient killer whale known as T73B immediately responded to the recorded underwater calls of whales likely familiar to him and left the harbour and was last seen heading for open ocean.

SEATTLE (AP) — Experts are preparing rare emergency efforts to administer antibiotics or feed live salmon to try to save a young emaciated orca that’s part of a critically endangered pod of killer whales. Another female orca from the group that spends time in U . S . Northwest waters attracted

The young female orca has sparked an international rescue effort by Canadian and American scientists who have developed a novel plan to feed her salmon medicated with antibiotics . Emergency efforts to rescue endangered killer whale hit snag in Canada.

Haulena said they watched J50 rejoin her group on Thursday. She showed no signs of breathing problems, which would indicate she probably doesn't have pneumonia.

"She was diving for long periods of time and was easily keeping up with her group. That is very good news," he said.

While the other whales were actively foraging for food, Haulena said they couldn't tell if she had been eating.

He said they were a few hours into their six-hour day with J50 when all the conditions aligned and they decided to attempt to administer the antibiotics by dart.

"I think it could have gone a little bit better and I would try things a little bit differently based on what we found," Haulena said. "The injection went in and did not deliver the full dosage. We probably got about half the dosage, maybe a little bit more into her."

He said a different needle could have been used to allow it to deliver the entire dose, but he didn't want the animal to have the needle remain with her for a few days or longer before it fell off.

U.S. and Canadian agencies partner to aid struggling orca in B.C. coastal waters

  U.S. and Canadian agencies partner to aid struggling orca in B.C. coastal waters The story of the southern resident J-pod orcas, and the mother mourning her dead calf, has drawn attention from around the world.  Now, one of the other calves in the same pod is starving, and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is working with Fisheries and Oceans Canada on a plan to save it.

The first calf born in three years to the endangered orcas that spend time in Pacific Northwest waters died Tuesday, the latest They're not getting enough of the large, fatty Chinook salmon that make up their main diet. They also face threats from toxic pollution and noise and disturbances from boats.

The young female orca has sparked an international rescue effort by Canadian and American scientists who have developed a novel plan to feed her salmon medicated with antibiotics . J50 is one of only 75 Southern resident killer whales that swim the coastal waters between British Columbia to California.

When the water calmed, the team was also able to get a sample from her blow hole, which he said they believe will be very valuable to assess.

Haulena said he has seen other killer whale this thin and they have not survived.

"Some of the things that are going in her favour, I suppose, are that she has been a thin whale for a relatively long period of time, so we're not looking at an acute disease process."

Researchers and members of the Lummi Nation have also been testing a plan to feed J50 chinook filled with medication, in case that is deemed necessary.

J50 is in the same pod as J35, a female killer whale that has been carrying the body of her dead calf since it died more than two weeks ago.

Thornton said a Fisheries and Oceans Canada team did encounter J35 off of the southern tip of Vancouver Island on Thursday and she was still pushing the body of the calf, which was born and died July 24.

'Slogging' killer whale J-50 gets live fish delivery in latest attempt to save her .
Efforts to help an endangered orca off the B.C. coast hit new uncharted waters Sunday, as U.S. biologists tried to feed the killer whale known as J-50 live chinook salmon off a boat. The "emergency response" to help the young whale already included a novel antibiotic treatment by dart at sea last week. Over the weekend, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Lummi Nation tried to deliver her food directly — both for nourishment and as a possible way to give medication in the future. "This type of thing has never been tried before and there was lots of potential things that could potentially go awry.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!