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EntertainmentJoaquin Phoenix on His Joker Transformation: ‘You Start to Go Mad’

17:06  31 august  2019
17:06  31 august  2019 Source:   thedailybeast.com

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The “ Joker ” actor opened up about his shocking turn as the titular supervillain at the Venice Film Festival. VENICE, Italy— Joaquin Phoenix ’s Arthur Fleck, the mentally-ill antagonist at the center of Todd Phillips’ Joker , is without question the most deranged version of the DC supervillain to ever hit

Joker Transformation Caused Joaquin Phoenix To ' Start to Go Mad '. " You start to go mad ." RELATED: Joker Movie Gets Eight-Minute Standing Ovation at Overseas Premiere. Phoenix also talked about how his conception of Joker changed during production and what interested him in the

Joaquin Phoenix on His Joker Transformation: ‘You Start to Go Mad’© Provided by The Daily Beast Warner Bros.

VENICE, Italy—Joaquin Phoenix’s Arthur Fleck, the mentally-ill antagonist at the center of Todd Phillips’ Joker, is without question the most deranged version of the DC supervillain to ever hit the screen.

“For me, the attraction to make this film and this character was that we were going to approach it in our own way,” Phoenix explained at the Venice Film Festival. “So for me, I didn’t refer to past interpretations of the character.”

According to director Todd Phillips, he and Phoenix met six months prior to shooting to design the character, his look, and his laugh. But it was the actor’s dramatic weight loss—a reported 52 pounds—that really made things click.

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Joker star Joaquin Phoenix has discussed the transformation he underwent to take on the iconic “ You start to go mad when you lose that amount of weight in that amount of time,” Phoenix told Daily Beast. He went on to discuss how reading Fleck’s journal and book of jokes helped him form his

The actor who portrayed the Joker in the eponymous movie which premiered Saturday told reporters he had to go through some serious mental exercises to catch the correct mindset of a damaged man who evolves into the twisted villain during the film.

“The first thing for us was the weight loss—I think that’s really what I started with. And, as it turns out, that then affects your psychology. You start to go mad when you lose that amount of weight in that amount of time,” said Phoenix. “There’s a book that I read about political assassins and would-be assassins that I thought was really interesting, and kind of breaks down the different types of personalities that do those sorts of things.”

Another helpful aide in locating the character was Fleck’s journal/joke book, filled with his nihilistic musings on the many absurdities of life.

“Very early on in the rehearsal, I was given the journal that he had—his journal and joke diary. And that was really helpful, because I had been there for a couple of weeks and wasn’t sure how I was going to start, and Todd sent this [empty] journal,” he recalled. “I didn’t know what to write, so I asked [Todd] for some suggestions, and after a few days, I ignored his suggestions and suddenly it was coming out. It became a really important part of the discovery of the character at that time.”

‘Joker’ Gets Eight-Minute Standing Ovation at Venice Premiere

‘Joker’ Gets Eight-Minute Standing Ovation at Venice Premiere The premiere of “Joker” at the Venice Film Festival drew an eight-minute standing ovation Saturday night for actor Joaquin Phoenix, director Todd Phillips and the gripping but harrowing origin story they’ve mapped out for Batman’s arch-villain. Phoenix and Phillips were joined in the Sala Grande by Zazie Beetz, who also stars in the film as Phoenix’s character’s neighbor. Robert De Niro, who plays a talk-show host, did not make the trek to the Lido. Buzz in Venice had been growing steadily around the Warner Bros.

Joaquin Phoenix , star of Todd Phillip's upcoming film Joker , says that while preparing for his role as the titular character he began to go mad . There has been significant talk as of late regarding Phoenix ’s Oscar potential for his work as the Joker . And while there does seem to be ample reason

You start to go mad .’ Well alright then. Pictures began emerging from the set months ago, with the trailer dropping last week which saw Joaquin expertly step into the Speaking about landing the role, Joaquin admitted one aspect that took him some time to grasp was his character’s distinctive laugh.

Phoenix repeatedly stressed that it was important for him to maintain the “mystery” of the character, and that he and Phillips engaged in a collaborative process where “throughout the course of shooting, every day we were discovering new aspects to his character and shades to his personality up until the very last day.”

And then there was the laugh—which in this Joker’s case is an uncontrollable, hyena-like shriek, delivered at the most inopportune times.

“Before I even read the script, Todd came over and talked me through what he wanted out of this character and this movie, and he showed me some videos, and he described the laughter as something that was almost painful,” offered Phoenix. “And so ultimately, I think Joker is a part of him that’s trying to emerge, and I think that was a really interesting way of looking at this laugh…It felt like a new, fresh way of looking at it. But honestly, I didn’t think that I could do it. I would practice alone and then asked Todd to come over to audition my laugh, because I felt like I had to do it on the spot and in front of somebody else. It took me a long time.”

Dark 'Joker' wins top Venice Film Festival prize

Dark 'Joker' wins top Venice Film Festival prize Todd Phillips' dark comic book film "Joker" won the Golden Lion Award at the 76th Venice International Film Festival on Saturday and cemented its place as a legitimate contender for the rest of the awards season. Jury president Lucretia Martel announced the winners of the prestigious award during a ceremony on the Lido. The Golden Lion previously put a spotlight on films that went on to be major awards season players, such as "Roma" and the film academy's 2018 best picture winner, "The Shape of Water." © Provided by Canadian Press Enterprises Inc"I want to thank Warner Bros.

Phoenix tells IndieWire that he worked telepathically with director Todd Phillips to create his clown, and it added layers to the script. Joaquin Phoenix is in a good mood. On those first few interviews he did before “ Joker ” went to Venice and startled everyone by winning the Golden Lion, he was poised to

Awesome to see Joaquin Phoenix Joker art btw there was a test footage of Joaquin in Joker makeup and I think it isn’t the final full out Joker look , it is just a look he wears while he is In a previous leak we see him angrily walk out a building and talks to a clown outside and tosses his nose on the street .

Phillips says his Joker was influenced by character studies of the ‘70s, including Taxi Driver, The King of Comedy, Serpico, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. But more so than those, the 1928 silent film The Man Who Laughs served as an important inspiration for director and star.

And though some may see the damaged Fleck as a “tragic” character, Phoenix begs to differ.

“I was interested in the light of Arthur, for lack of a better word,” he said. “It wasn’t just the torment; it was his struggle to find happiness, to feel connected, to find the warmth and love—that’s the part of the character I was interested in and worth exploring.”

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