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Entertainment ‘Joker’ Review: Joaquin Phoenix’s Joker Is Indeed Wild

17:51  04 october  2019
17:51  04 october  2019 Source:   rollingstone.com

Dark 'Joker' wins top Venice Film Festival prize

Dark 'Joker' wins top Venice Film Festival prize Todd Phillips' dark comic book film "Joker" won the Golden Lion Award at the 76th Venice International Film Festival on Saturday and cemented its place as a legitimate contender for the rest of the awards season. Jury president Lucretia Martel announced the winners of the prestigious award during a ceremony on the Lido. The Golden Lion previously put a spotlight on films that went on to be major awards season players, such as "Roma" and the film academy's 2018 best picture winner, "The Shape of Water." © Provided by Canadian Press Enterprises Inc"I want to thank Warner Bros.

In Joker , Joaquin Phoenix digs into the title role, kicks out the jams, and stamps the character with a danger all his own. Comics fans will need to keep cool, however, since Phoenix and director Todd Phillips — who co-wrote the script with Scott Silver — have devised a stand-alone origin story that

In Joker , Joaquin Phoenix digs into the title role, kicks out the jams, and stamps the character with a danger all his own. “Phenomenal” is a puny word to describe his gut-punch performance.

For the first time, the man who laughs gets the star spot all to himself. No going 50-50 with the Caped Crusader, like Jack Nicholson did in Batman; even the late, great Heath Ledger’s Oscar for The Dark Knight was for Best Supporting Actor. In Joker, Joaquin Phoenix digs into the title role, kicks out the jams, and stamps the character with a danger all his own. “Phenomenal” is a puny word to describe his gut-punch performance. Over-the-top? Maybe. But if you want to trade Hollywood pablum for bug-f--- intensity, do it with an actor who knows how to humanize a guy destined for hell. Laughing maniacally, dancing on a stairway to Gary Glitter’s “Rock and Roll Part 2,” and twisting his face and body into contortions that defy physics, Phoenix is a virtuoso of unleashed id. You don’t dare look away from him.

Todd Phillips Says Joaquin Phoenix’s Joker Won’t Meet Robert Pattinson’s Batman

Todd Phillips Says Joaquin Phoenix’s Joker Won’t Meet Robert Pattinson’s Batman “Joker” director Todd Phillips isn’t optimistic when it comes to a future meeting between Joaquin Phoenix’s Joker and Robert Pattinson’s recently announced Batman “No, definitely not,” he told Variety when asked if the pair would appear in a future film together. 

Joker , which seems to draw in equal measure on Martin Scorsese’s scabrous media satire The King of Comedy and Alan Moore and Brian Bolland’s graphic novel Like Heath Ledger’s Oscar-winning turn in The Dark Knight, Joker has an ace card in the form of Joaquin Phoenix ’ s mesmerisingly physical

Todd Phillips’ s “ Joker ” is a crazy movie, and no, I’m not referring to any of the aspects of the film that some consider problematic or socially irresponsible or whatever. So, it’ s crazy because it’ s tough to connect the dots between the character of Arthur Fleck ( Joaquin Phoenix ) and the character of the

a person brushing the teeth with a toothbrush in the mouth: JKR_DAY005_091818_0168787.dng © Provided by Penske Media Corporation JKR_DAY005_091818_0168787.dng Comics fans will need to keep cool, however, since Phoenix and director Todd Phillips — who co-wrote the script with Scott Silver — have devised a stand-alone origin story that owes no allegiance to the DC Universe canon. If any deference is paid, it’s to Martin Scorsese, whose Taxi Driver inspires the gritty look of Gotham City circa 1981 (deep bows to the brute-force camerawork of Lawrence Sher) and whose lead character in that film, Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro), lives in the same bloody torment as our clown-face antihero.

Say hello to Arthur Fleck, introduced by Phoenix as a loser whose struggles with mental illness leave him mostly solitary. Arthur is a clown for hire who dreams of doing stand-up comedy. He and his mom (Frances Conroy) live in squalor and obsess over a late-night TV talkfest hosted by Murray Franklin, played by De Niro in a scrappy spin on The King of Comedy‘s comic-turned-kidnapper, Rupert Pupkin. Surprisingly, Arthur finds a love connection with Sophie (a feisty Zazie Beetz), a single mom in his building. What’s a sexy, caring woman doing with Arthur? Yes, the hookup at first is just as unconvincing as it is in the two Scorsese movies to which Joker owes such a massive debt. What matters more here is Arthur’s yearning, which Phoenix plays with a striking, wounded tenderness.

Joaquin Phoenix visits Toronto subway station to support vegan campaign

Joaquin Phoenix visits Toronto subway station to support vegan campaign TORONTO — "Joker" star Joaquin Phoenix stunned Toronto subway passengers with a surprise visit that briefly clogged a downtown station's platform and stairwells. The movie star made the afternoon appearance just before rush hour to view an underground publicity campaign promoting veganism, but did not speak to onlookers or board a train. Phoenix spent about five minutes wandering past transit riders to view black-and-white images of farmed

Phoenix ' s portrayal of Arthur Fleck is going to be remembered for a lifetime. Phoenix sways, grimaces, shuffles, and delivers terrible, involuntary paroxysms of laughter even as he openly weeps. He just does it in service of a character who isn't particularly Joker -like, other than in the most superficial ways.

Joaquin Phoenix plays Arthur Fleck, a pathetic loser and loner in Gotham City, some time in the early 1980 s . Arthur is a former inpatient at a I wonder what Joker would be like with Galifianakis in the lead. Well, the casting of Phoenix indicates more clearly how sexy Joker is supposed to be.

Phillips, best known for the farcical hijinks of Road Trip, Old School, and the Hangover trilogy, uses the New Hollywood influence to add darker shades to his palette, but he finds a flinty, individual style as the plot progresses. For Phoenix, the challenge is blending Joker’s manic hilarity without shortchanging the clinical depression and Tourette’s-like outbursts that never let up on Arthur’s psyche. How much of the movie is real or in Arthur’s head is up to each viewer. You may laugh with and at this transfixing character, but you can’t laugh him off.

Not surprisingly, the catalyst for Arthur’s transition into a clown prince of crime is violence. The emaciated sad sack (Phoenix lost a reported 52 pounds for the role) is bullied relentlessly, first by punks on the street and later on the subway by Wall Street wolves who think this clown, this mama’s boy, is aching to get his ass kicked. A previously introduced handgun is put to use. And the gut-wrenching, R-rated massacre turns our man in makeup into a tabloid star popular enough to inspire a chorus of masked clowns 
to march in protest against the rich, repped by mayoral candidate Thomas Wayne (Brett Cullen), the father 
of Bruce.

The Batman parallels will make you wince, especially when they connect to Arthur’s mother. It’s a momentum dip from which Phillips recovers with a scene that will have audiences arguing for ages. Fleck, invited to appear on Murray Franklin Live, is humiliated by the host until he explosively turns the tables. Is sympathy for this devil another form of advocacy for vigilante justice? Or are Phoenix and Phillips pushing for a fuller understanding of how a victim can morph into a victimizer, an indisputable fact of life that tragically resonates today? As entertainment and provocation, Joker is simply stupendous.

‘Maleficent: Mistress of Evil’ Maintains Box Office Reign Over ‘Joker’ After All .
Angelina Jolie kept the crown away from Joaquin Phoenix over the weekend in one of the closest box office races in recent memory. Final figures released Monday showed that Disney’s “Maleficent: Mistress of Evil” slipped past Warner Bros.’ “Joker” with $19.37 million to $19.25 million for the Friday-Sunday weekend — or a gap of about $120,000, enough to deny “Joker” a third victory after winning its first two weekends. Most estimates during the weekend had shown the fourth weekend of “Joker” with a slight lead over Disney’s second frame of “Mistress of Evil.

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