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Entertainment The best and worst fictional teachers

16:46  17 september  2020
16:46  17 september  2020 Source:   yardbarker.com

New math curriculum an added challenge for Ontario elementary schools this fall

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Nicky Hilton holding a book: Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP/Shutterstock © Provided by People Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP/Shutterstock

Nicky Hilton Rothschild is recounting the "very emotional" experience of watching her sister Paris Hilton's candid documentary.

In a recent interview with E! News, Nicky opened up about the first time she watched Paris' YouTube Originals documentary, This Is Paris, and how proud she is that her sister is speaking out about her past trauma.

Nicky Hilton holding a book: © Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP/Shutterstock "Going through so much trauma and reliving it with the whole world watching is very brave," Nicky Hilton said of her sister

"It was very, very emotional. We watched it for the first time," the fashion designer began.

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Nicky, 36, continued on to say that she "snuck downstairs" to watch the film with her sister before it premiered online as Paris didn't want her mother to watch the documentary.

"She said, ‘I don't want mom to see it.' I was like, ‘Well she's going to see it in a few weeks when it's on YouTube for the whole world to see,'" Nicky recalled.

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"We watched it together. We laughed. We cried," she continued. "I'm just so proud of her because going through so much trauma and reliving it with the whole world watching is very brave."

Paris debuted her raw and emotional documentary helmed by Emmy-winning director Alexandra Dean on Monday. In This Is Paris, a nearly two-hour film, the star goes into detail about the alleged abuse she suffered at boarding school in Utah — and how her trauma has carried over into adulthood.

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Nicky went on to share that Paris' decision to open up about her past has already inspired many people.

a woman looking at the camera: Paris Hilton/Youtube Paris Hilton © Provided by People Paris Hilton/Youtube Paris Hilton

"I've got so many messages today from people I know who've been through similar things, from strangers saying, ‘I'm so happy that I don't feel alone anymore.' I'm so thrilled that she did it," Nicky told E! News, adding, "I think a lot of people were shocked and just seeing her allow herself to be so vulnerable without the glam team and just so raw."

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In August, ahead of the film's release, Paris opened up to PEOPLE about her decision to reflect on her past in her documentary.

“It feels like my nightmare is over,” she said. “And I’m going to watch the movie with my parents — I think it will be good for us, but emotional too. There are no more secrets.”

The former Simple Life star said she doesn’t have any plans currently to pursue legal justice; instead, she’s focused on raising awareness about other so-called behavior improvement schools that she says still employ as a practice the kind of physical and verbal abuse she endured for so long.

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“I want these places shut down,” she said. “I want them to be held accountable. And I want to be a voice for children and now adults everywhere who have had similar experiences. I want it to stop for good and I will do whatever I can to make it happen.”

This Is Paris is streaming now on YouTube.


Gallery: Paris Hilton’s Doc: Abusive Exes, Traumatic Schooling and More Revelations (US Weekly)

a young girl looking at the camera: The real Paris Hilton. Although the heiress has been known for years as a character, in YouTube’s This Is Paris documentary, 39-year-old Hilton reveals her true self — and her traumatic upbringing. “Something happened in my childhood that I never talked about with anyone,” she says in the opening moments of the documentary, which will be released on Monday, September 14. “I still have nightmares about it. I wish I could bring, like, a camera into my dreams, and, like, show you what it’s like. It’s terrifying. And I relive that every night. I experienced it and to this day I am still traumatized and I think the only way to have these nightmares stop is to do something about it.” Throughout the doc, the DJ opens up for the first time about being sent away to multiple different boarding schools — as her parents called them — and the trauma that she experienced there, that ultimately changed her life. “I wanted to do something, but at the same time I didn’t want to hurt my brand,” she shares in the video. “I can’t have this be part of my business, and people won’t understand. But if I don’t do this it’s going to continue to happen and I’m going to continue being traumatized and think about it the rest of my life.” Ultimately, she comes together with multiple other survivors of one of the schools — Provo Canyon in Utah, which she calls “the worst of the worst.” Together, they begin a campaign to expose the abuse they’re alleging, with hopes that other young children will not experience the same. The documentary also gives a look into the true Paris, who her sister, Nicky Hilton, says is “like a boy at heart,” and her relationship with those closest to her — her sister and her mother, Kathy Hilton, as well as her team. It also details why she’s pushed so many people away, her insomnia, why she spends nearly 16 hours a day on her phone and much more.     “This is something I’ve never done before, just from always playing a character, being this persona. That’s all I’ve ever known or ever been,” the former reality star told Us Weekly exclusively about the doc. “Even watching, I was like, ‘Oh my God, can we cut this?’ They’re like, ‘Nope, you don’t have editing approval.’ It’s a very vulnerable position, but it’s also very empowering. I feel, especially it being 2020, I think it’s all about being real and authentic and showing who you truly are. Some parts are very traumatic or hard in my life and I want to be able to tell my story so people can understand me and also understand themselves.” As her sister explains in the special, Paris is nothing like the “character” that she’s portrayed and is almost the opposite. She doesn’t care about her clothes or shoes — in the doc, she admits she wears sweats every day and hasn’t worn most of what she has. Additionally, as she’s recently revealed, the baby voice Paris has used through the years is not real. “In everything else, I’ve always had like the baby voice and I’ve always been so different,” she told Us. “I don’t blame people for having misconceptions, because I created it with that character, who everyone thought was a real person. … Now I’m actually showing people that that was not really me. I was in on the joke.” Scroll through the gallery below for the biggest revelations from the documentary.

Teachers worried about their health, quality of education as they deal with COVID-19 .
OTTAWA — Kelly Main says she has never felt as exhausted and stressed during her 27 years of teaching high school as she has since returning to the classroom this fall during the COVID-19 pandemic. As someone who teaches Grades 10 and 12 in Waterloo, Ont., she is facing the challenge of delivering material to students in class and online at the same time. Waterloo Region School Board, like many others across the country, has adopted a hybrid system to have a smaller number of students in class at one time in a bid to avoid COVID-19 outbreaks.

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This is interesting!