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Entertainment Alberta premier says federal throne speech stomps into provincial jurisdiction

00:02  25 september  2020
00:02  25 september  2020 Source:   msn.com

The West Block – Episode 53, Season 9

  The West Block – Episode 53, Season 9 Episode 53, Season 9. Watch the full broadcast of The West Block from Sunday, Sept. 6, 2020, with Mercedes Stephenson.Episode 53, Season 9

The throne speech opens a new session of the legislature and outlines the broad goals and Getting Alberta back to work, making life better for Albertans and standing up for Alberta are your replace the federal parole board with a provincial parole board in charge of parole eligibility and terms for

The throne speech vows to use federal spending to get back the last million or so jobs, including through direct investments in the social sector and Dan Kelly, president of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, said the extended wage subsidy will be a help for small companies, as well

Jason Kenney wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Alberta Premier Jason Kenney says he is disappointed with the federal government's throne speech. He says there is nothing in the Trudeau government's plan for the ailing energy industry. © CBC Alberta Premier Jason Kenney says he is disappointed with the federal government's throne speech. He says there is nothing in the Trudeau government's plan for the ailing energy industry.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney sees grounds for more constitutional challenges, should the federal Liberal government follow through with promises contained in Wednesday's throne speech.

Kenney told reporters Thursday morning that federal government plans jeopardize global investments in Alberta's forestry and fertilizer sectors — moves the premier believes are an infringement on Alberta's right to develop its own natural resources.

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Premier Rachel Notley suggested in a news conference earlier in the day that the province is particularly vulnerable to fluctuations in supply. The throne speech also outlined a number of bills and initiatives the government intends to While rural crime made it into the throne speech , Kenney

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney had harsh words for the federal government's throne speech , saying the Liberal energy agenda will "strangle investment and jeopardize resource jobs [in Alberta ]." " Alberta is disappointed that instead of listening to Canada's provinces , the federal government doubled

He called the speech a "full-frontal attack" on federalism.

"There were more policies that would invade provincial jurisdiction than I could count," Kenney said.

He accused the Trudeau government of pursuing policies that require constitutional amendments.

"I regret the federal government so spectacularly failed the mark yesterday."

WATCH | Alberta Premier Jason Kenney responds to the throne speech

The Alberta government is already challenging the federal government's consumer carbon tax in court, as well as the federal Impact Assessment Act, which changed the environmental approval process for major infrastructure projects.

Kenney said other premiers may share his concerns, and he plans to speak with his colleagues across the country later Thursday.

COMMENTARY: Canadians want throne speech to focus on current problems, not ‘big picture’ ideas

  COMMENTARY: Canadians want throne speech to focus on current problems, not ‘big picture’ ideas Justin Trudeau hinted at a throne speech with big ideas. But polling shows Canadians are more focused on fighting the pandemic and its economic effects, Darrell Bricker says.Wednesday’s throne speech is unusual because the Trudeau Liberals were re-elected less than a year ago and their last throne speech still has that new speech smell.

Alberta anxiety over the federal Throne Speech set for Sept. 23 is running high. And the uncertainty is the killer. When Chrystia Freeland was named Finance You can read almost anything you want into the remarks from Justin Trudeau and Ms. Freeland. But the worry in some quarters of the province

The Governor General is the federal representative of Canada’s Monarch, Queen Elizabeth II. Immigration will be key to supporting Canada’s COVID-19 economic recovery said Payette. The throne speech itself does not get into the specifics of how the government’s plans will be carried out.

The premier also reiterated comments from a written statement he issued Wednesday, saying the federal speech from the throne failed to acknowledge the Canadian oil and gas sector and included policies destined to damage an already-battered industry.

Federal tax incentives promised for companies developing net-zero technologies unfairly exclude the oil and gas sector, Kenney said.

"There was space for every bright shiny object, every possible political distraction," he said. "Kooky academic theories like intersectionality found their way into yesterday's throne speech, but not one word about health transfers for the provinces that are carrying 80 per cent of the costs as our population ages and we cope with a pandemic."

Kenney also said Alberta would attempt to opt out of a promised federal pharmacare program, saying the province already has its own program. He would expect an equivalent cash transfer from Ottawa, who he said should stay out of "micromanaging" Alberta's health spending priorities.

Throne speech pledges extended wage subsidy, help for women and taxes

  Throne speech pledges extended wage subsidy, help for women and taxes There are also plans for a new federal disability benefit modeled after the Guaranteed Income Supplement for low-income seniors.The Liberal government unveiled plans to extend the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy through to next summer and a variety of initiatives to help workers and especially women rejoin the workforce, including steps toward a Canada-wide childcare system and funding for skills training.

"Disappointing throne speech for Quebec. Does not respect provinces ' jurisdiction over health. I am going to discuss it tomorrow with the premiers of the other provinces ." " Alberta is disappointed that instead of listening to Canada’s provinces , the federal government doubled down on policies

Premier Jason Kenney said Albertans can expect fiscal restraint as his government vowed in the throne speech to hold public consultations on how to return to balance while still maintaining Premier Jason Kenney smiles as the speech from the throne is delivered in the Alberta legislature.

In the House of Commons Thursday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau responded to similar critiques from Opposition Conservative MPs, saying the federal government has supported Albertans and the oil and gas industry during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Thousands of Albertans collected the Canada emergency response benefit (CERB) and businesses stayed afloat with the emergency wage subsidy, Trudeau said.

"We made investments in cleaning up orphaned wells, which is something that was a provincial area of jurisdiction that we are happy to support because we needed to keep give people opportunities to do the right thing and to have work through this difficult time," Trudeau said.

The federal government allocated $1 billion of the $1.7-billion well cleanup program to Alberta projects.

Alberta also received $1.3 billion from the federal government's "safe restart" funding to provinces, which will help pay for more COVID-19 testing, health-care staffing and protective equipment, among other things.

Alberta Opposition NDP leader Rachel Notley said she was alarmed by Kenney's throne speech comments.

Throne speech: Liberals vow to launch campaign to create one million new jobs, extend wage subsidy until 2021

  Throne speech: Liberals vow to launch campaign to create one million new jobs, extend wage subsidy until 2021 Deputy Leader of the Opposition and Conservative MP Candice Bergen said Wednesday the party is ready for a federal election if the NDP does not support the throne speech, which was delivered on Wednesday by Governor General Julie Payette. Bergen said that the prime minister should have presented a throne speech that addressed concerns of the Opposition, the provinces and “every day Canadians.”

OTTAWA — In a new speech from the throne , the Liberal government detailed its plan to face the Here are highlights from Wednesday’s speech : Helping provinces reinforce COVID-19 testing. A federal testing assistance response team will be created to quickly meet surging testing needs

The Liberal federal government said it would work with Canadian provinces to improve testing While the speech made no specific spending commitments - those will come later - it said this was The Bloc Quebecois said the plan did not respect provincial jurisdiction over healthcare and did not

"This premier is so focused from distracting from his own inability to create jobs and restart economic growth that he is continuing his fake fights with Ottawa at the expense of the best interests of the people has been asked to represent," Notley said at a news conference in Lethbridge.

She said a federal pharmacare plan would improve the quality and affordability of health care for millions of Albertans by allowing all patients to afford the medications their doctors prescribe.

One of the pillars of the throne speech was a promise by the Liberal minority government to create over one million jobs through direct investment, wage subsidies and other skills and incentives programs.

The government also promised to exceed its goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent below 2005 levels and legislate Canada's goal of net-zero emissions by 2050.

WATCH | The federal government outlines its environmental policy goals:

-- With files from Terry Reith


Video: Coronavirus: Alberta premier calls for ‘fiscal fairness on health care’ ahead of throne speech (Global News)

Federal Liberals see small boost after throne speech: Ipsos poll .
The survey, conducted by Ipsos for Global News, found the Sept. 23 Throne Speech and subsequent address by Justin Trudeau gave the Liberals a small boost over the opposition.The poll, conducted by Ipsos exclusively for Global News, found that if an election were to be held tomorrow, 36 per cent of Canadians would vote for Prime Minister Trudeau and the Liberal party, while 31 per cent would vote for Erin O'Toole and Conservative Party.

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