•   
  •   
  •   

Entertainment Comic Relief To Stop Sending Celebrities To Africa After “White Savior” Criticism

14:10  28 october  2020
14:10  28 october  2020 Source:   deadline.com

Former voice of the Reds' Thom Brennaman on homophobic slur: 'I know I hurt a lot of people'

  Former voice of the Reds' Thom Brennaman on homophobic slur: 'I know I hurt a lot of people' Former Reds broadcaster Thom Brennaman spoke about the homophobic slur he used, saying he's hoping to make a difference in the LGBTQ community.Despite no fans, Raiders open new stadium with a bang

to Africa after criticism that stars like Stacey Dooley were going to Africa as " white saviours ". The charity will also stop using images of starving people or critically ill children to portray the "I'm proud that Comic Relief is making these changes and I am looking forward to seeing the films next

Comic Relief will stop sending celebrities such as Ed Sheeran or Stacy Dooley to make promotional films in African countries, after deciding the approach reinforces outdated stereotypes about “ white saviours ”. The anti-poverty charity, best known for its Red Nose Day fundraising events

Ed Sheeran et al. posing for the camera © Comic Relief / Youtube

Click here to read the full article.

Major UK charity Comic Relief, founded in 1985 by Lenny Henry and Richard Curtis in response to famine in Ethiopia, says it will stop sending celebrities to Africa for fundraising appeals due to recent criticism.

Celebs including presenter Stacey Dooley and Ed Sheeran have been branded “white saviors” for making videos in poverty-stricken villages. Dooley travelled to Uganda last year and pictures of her holding a young boy were labelled “tired and unhelpful stereotypes” by Labour MP David Lammy. Sheeran’s trip to Liberia in 2017 for the org was similarly called “offensive and stereotypical”.

Rays look like American League's best: Three takeaways from Tampa Bay's sweep of Blue Jays

  Rays look like American League's best: Three takeaways from Tampa Bay's sweep of Blue Jays Tampa Bay is on to the ALDS and has its eyes set on a run deep into October after sweeping the Blue Jays.Ian Happ a big fan of DH in National League

Comic Relief will stop sending celebrities like Ed Sheeran and Stacy Dooley to make promotional films in African countries, after deciding the The move follows growing criticism of Comic Relief ’s fundraising approach, which has often seen the charity send a white British celebrity to visit an

Image caption David Lammy MP criticised Comic Relief for sending Stacey Dooley to Africa . The Labour MP previously criticised the charity appeal for sending documentary maker Stacey Dooley to film in Africa , saying "the world does not need any more white saviours ".

More from Deadline
  • BBC Presenter & 'Strictly Come Dancing' Winner Stacey Dooley Sets Up Production Company With Keshet-Backed Greenbird
  • This Week In Music: Ken Burns, Ed Sheeran, Lindsay Lohan, Dolores O'Riordan
  • This Week In Music: Ed Sheeran, Taylor Swift, Badshah By The Numbers

“The world does not need any more white saviors,” Lammy was quoted as saying, adding that picture conjured “a colonial image of a white, beautiful heroine holding a black child, with no agency, no parents in sight”.

Curtis and Henry have both since suggested that the organization will move away from its traditional approach of celebrity-fronted campaign films towards a local approach using filmmakers from Africa to make more authentic pieces.

“A lot has changed over Comic Relief’s 35 years, and so the way we raise money and talk about the issues we are here to tackle, and the people we are here to support, must change as well,” said Henry today.

“African people don’t want us to tell their stories for them. What they need is more agency, a platform and partnership.

“Investing in local talent across Africa to tell stories from their communities is great and a much-needed step forward, but as always there is more that can be done. The energy and passion for change and new perspectives is there in bucket loads,” he added.

COMMENTARY: How comics can teach media literacy and help identify fake news .
As consumers, we need to learn how to filter content and become our own educators, editors and fact-checkers, says Erin Steuter of Mount Allison University,But does setting fire to cell towers make your list? Probably not. A conspiracy theory linking 5G mobile technology to the COVID-19 outbreak has ignited fears worldwide, prompting just this response from a few individuals in Québec, who set ablaze seven mobile towers.

usr: 0
This is interesting!