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Entertainment Senate Republicans Target Twitter And Other Tech CEOs, While Democrats See A Partisan “Sham”

19:46  28 october  2020
19:46  28 october  2020 Source:   deadline.com

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The latest news out of the latest congressional hearing on tech platform’s content moderation practices was from Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook, who said that he’s open to a rethink of Section 230.

That’s the provision of a 1996 law that gives Facebook, Twitter, Google and other platforms immunity for the way that they moderate third party content.

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But just six days before a presidential election, the Senate Commerce Committee hearing with Zuckerberg, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Alphabet-Google CEO Sundar Pichai was, for anyone who’s been following this stuff, exactly what you would think.

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One after another, Republicans griped that their voices were being stifled on the platforms, with inconsistently deployed policies or what a number of lawmakers see as bias against the right (counterpoint: Facebook’s top performing links over the past 24 hours).

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), who promoted the hearing with a meme akin to a prizefight, didn’t disappoint as he declared, “The three witnesses we have before this committee collectively pose I believe the single greatest threat to free speech in America and the greatest threat we have to free and fair elections.”

Then he focused on the long-bearded Dorsey, as he blasted Twitter for limiting the reach of the New York Post story on Hunter Biden. Dorsey admitted earlier this month that its approach was initially clunky, but defended their continued restrictions on the Post account because of violations to its hacked materials policy. He said that they could have their account unlocked if they removed a tweet in question.

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“Mr. Dorsey, who the hell elected you? … Why do you insist on operating as a Democratic SuperPAC silencing the news contrary to your political beliefs?” Cruz asked.

“We are not doing that, and this is why I opened this hearing with calls for more transparency. We realize we need to earn trust more,” Dorsey responded.

A little less combative was when Dorsey faced the committee’s chairman, Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS), over Twitter’s labeling of some of President Donald Trump’s tweets but not incendiary posts from Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

As protests erupted following the death of George Floyd in May, Trump tweeted, “Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” Twitter flagged the tweet as glorifying violence. But some critics pounced, including FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, who pointed to the lack of action against Khamenei’s tweets.

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“We did not find those to violate our terms of service, because we considered them saber-rattling,” Dorsey said, while adding that “speech against our own people, or our country’s own citizens” is different because it “can cause more immediate harm.”

While Democrats had their own criticisms of the CEOs, focused on the inability of the platforms to curb the flow of misinformation, they also targeted the timing of the hearing.

“The Republican majority is politicizing what actually should not be a partisan topic,” said Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN).

Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI) was more direct, what he said was a partisan “play” to pressure platforms from taking steps to curb misinformation in advance of the election. “We have to call this hearing what it is: It’s a sham.”


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Facebook and Twitter audited by the US Senate for suspicion of anti-conservatism .
© Provided by Clubic The CEOs Facebook and Twitter's Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey were heard by the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, November 17. They had to explain their handling of the presidential election, but especially the fact-checking of an article denouncing the activities of 's son Joe Biden . With a Republican majority, the Senate blames social networks for anti-conservative biases as well as censorship against the party.

usr: 0
This is interesting!